GOPHERSPACE.DE - P H O X Y
gophering on sdf.org
BOSTONER TORAH INSIGHTS III

   BOSTONER ‘CHASSIDUS’ TRANSLATED INTO ENGLISH
   PARSHAS ACHREI MOS KEDOSHIM – 8 IYAR 5780
   Bostoner Rebbe shlit”a – Yerushalayim
   Secretariat Email: [1]bostonrebbe@gmail.com

   ═════════════════════════════════════════
════════════════════════════════

   “Speak to the entire assembly of Bnei Yisroel and say to them: You shall
   be holy because holy am I, Hashem Elokechem” (Vayikra 19:2). Rashi
   explains that this section of the Torah was transmitted ‘to the entire
   assembly’ since the majority of the basic precepts and laws are contained
   within Parshas Kedoshim.

   The Gemara (Shabbos 31a) records an interaction between Shammai the Elder
   and a non-Jew. The non-Jew asked Shammai how many Torahs there were.
   Shammai answered that there were two: The Written Torah and the Oral
   Torah. The non-Jew said that he was willing to accept the Torah
   Sh’Bichtav, but not the Torah Sh’B’Al Peh. Shammai then proceeded to
   rebuke the man and sent him away. When the same non-Jew approached Hillel
   with the exact same proposition, Hillel allowed him to become a Jew.
   Hillel began teaching the man the Hebrew letters of Aleph Bet. The
   following day when the non-Jew returned to continue his studies, Hillel
   identified the letters incorrectly. The non-Jew corrected Hillel stating
   what he had learned the previous day. Hillel remarked to the non-Jew that
   if he relied on Hillel his teacher to teach him the proper pronunciation
   and order of the letters, then he should also rely on his teacher to teach
   him the Oral Torah as well.

   Another non-Jew approached Shammai with a similar absurd condition to his
   becoming a Jew, namely to learn all that is required while standing on one
   foot. Shammai chased away this man as well. When this non-Jew came before
   Hillel with the same proposition, Hillel permitted him to become a Jew,
   teaching the man that what he despises he should not do toward his fellow
   man. That concept comprises the entire Torah and the rest of Torah study
   is only deeper explanations to reinforce this concept. Rashi explains that
   ‘your fellow’ includes Hashem himself. It is interesting to note that
   Hillel uses the negative language ‘what you despise do not do unto your
   friend, rather than stating his fundamental principle in a positive way,
   such as ‘Love your fellow like yourself’. Perhaps one answer is that there
   are certain circumstances where you must love yourself more than your
   fellow Jew, such as when your life is in danger, the rule is that your
   life comes before another’s life.

   The Rebbe zt”l often explained that the Mitzvah of V’Ahavta L’Rayacha
   KaMocha, to love your neighbor as you love yourself, was specifically
   juxtaposed with the prohibitive Mitzvah of prohibiting revenge or holding
   a grudge, Lo Tikom V’Lo Titor, teach us that one must love his fellow
   Jew even if he is not ‘like yourself’. When he doesn’t dress like you or
   have the same customs as you or has a different approach to his Avodas
   Hashem then you.

   Another approach, suggested by the Maharsha, is that a non-Jew who is
   attempting to become a Jew cannot yet comprehend what it means to love
   another like himself. One can only comprehend from the reverse position to
   avoid doing to others what you yourself despise. Once the person makes the
   full transition into Judaism can that Jewish soul understand the true
   intention and understanding of the concept to ‘love your fellow Jew like
   yourself’.

   The Sho’el U’Mayshiv adds that the ‘love’ of non-Jews is not the same as
   the ‘love’ of Jews. A Jew needs other Jews in order to fulfill Mitzvos
   that are Ben Adam L’Chaveiro. For example one Jew needs two other Jews to
   eat with him in order for him to say Birkat HaMazon in a Zimun, and he
   needs nine other Jews to make a Minyan and recite Kadish, Kedusha, Torah
   Reading, et. al. Therefore, this need of inter-dependency in order to
   fulfill Avodas Hashem necessitates ‘love’ between two Jews.

   The Maharsha asks that there are many Mitzvos that seemingly have no
   connection ‘what you despise do not do unto your friend’, such as
   Tefillin, Tzitzis and other Mitzvos between Man and Hashem. The Rebbe zt”l
   would answer this with a parable. If a person were to invite a guest into
   his home, and the guest would complain about the furniture or the
   configuration of the house, the host would explain to the guest that the
   host is the owner of the house, and arranges the home primarily to suit
   his own needs. If the guests is happy he is welcome to stay, but if he is
   unhappy, he is welcome to leave and find other accommodations.

   So too, Hashem, as the Creator of the world, arranged the world in his
   Divine Wisdom, as the entire World is his to do as he sees fit. We have a
   choice. We can accept his world as a guest, with Hashem as our Host, or if
   we have complaints we are ‘welcome’ to create our own world ex nihilo,
   just as he did, and do whatever we wish there, but if we choose to reside
   in Hashem’s world we must abide by the will of our Host. This is how we
   must understand the phrase ‘what you despise do not do unto your friend’.

   The message to us today in these challenging times, where we are being
   instructed by health officials, our Rabbanim and our politicians to
   physically distance ourselves from our fellow in order to protect our
   lives and wellness, this is also a Mitzvah of ‘Love your fellow like
   yourself’. May this difficult time arouse in us love for our fellow Jew,
   as we realize all that we lack when we cannot be physically close with our
   extended families, our friends and members of our community, as we have in
   the past. It really is true that we do not truly realize the value of
   something until it is taken away from us. In the merit of our unity as a
   Klal in Torah, Tefillah and Mitzvos, even as we are physically separated,
   may Hashem restore the Beis HaMikdash and bring the Geulah Shlayma,
   speedily in our days.

   Last updated 2020-05-05 13:27:50 +0200

References

   Visible links
   1. mailto:bostonrebbe@gmail.com