GOPHERSPACE.DE - P H O X Y
gophering on sdf.org
Lifewizard Way Workbook

   Copyright and licensing terms by which you may reproduce this work even
   for profit.

   This book consists of a preview of the forthcoming book Faith, Foster and
   the Lifewizard Way along with an 8-page workbook that you can reproduce
   and use to collect answers to insightful questions. These questions will
   help you identify wise adults and peers who can help you grow so you can
   realize your potential and adapt to a changing world.

   This work is copyright 2020 by Viral Virtue, Inc., a New Jersey
   corporation with a mission to make viral the idea that we should all do
   the right thing. Inspire others to do the right thing by setting a good
   example. Visit: ViralVirtue.com.

   This work is licensed to you under a Creative Commons Attribution -
   NonCommercial - NoDerivatives 4.0 International license. This means you do
   not need our permission to reproduce this work as long as you give us
   credit, you give it away and you do not modify it. Explanation here:
   [1]https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/

   Because this workbook is especially useful for prompting discussion during
   this global COVID-19 global time out, we hereby further modify this
   license to allow the sale of this book as follows:

   If you have a job that puts you at risk to the COVID-19 virus, you have
   lost a job or lost income because of the virus, you own a business that
   has been negatively impacted, or you have the virus yourself then you may
   reproduce this work and sell it at a profit and keep all the profits for
   yourself. Or you can give it as thank-you gifts to people who give you
   money. Either way is fine by us.

   If you do not qualify as one of the individuals then you may still sell
   this book in printed form but you may not keep more than 15% of profits
   for yourself and the rest must go to one or more of the people listed
   above, or to a charity of your choice.

   For example, if you haven’t been impacted by the virus but your parents
   have then if you produce the book for $3 and sell it for $10 then you have
   a $7 profit. You may give all $7 to your parents, or you can keep up to
   $1.05 for yourself and give them the rest.

   Note: It is possible that there are income tax consequences of accepting
   money in exchange for this work that we give to you. This depends on your
   circumstances. If there is any doubt you should consult an advisor because
   we take no responsibility for any consequences of how you use or
   distribute this work.

   ═════════════════════════════════════════
════════════════════════════════

   Hi there! My name is Faith.

   On March 1, 2020 two things happened that will change the world forever.
   Are you ready?

   March 1, 2020 was the day we learned that the coronavirus had killed its
   first American victim. The New York Times said there was going to be a
   pandemic. The President said there was no reason to panic. They were both
   right.

   The second important thing about that day? It was when my friend, Foster,
   and I started decoding an ancient Chinese document called The Lifewizard
   Way. In it we learned how to find wise, un-panicky adults who can help us
   make sense of this suddenly strange new world.

   I’ll let Foster pick up the story from here.

  March 7, 2020

   The man who opened the door of the Chinese-American Playful Friendship
   Society looked neither Chinese nor friendly. He dwarfed Gramps and could
   have weighed more than Faith, Gramps, and me combined.

   The giant’s lips curled into a sneer. He glared down his nose at Gramps.
   “What do you want?”

   Gramps recoiled with a look on his face like he might actually pee
   himself.

   Faith just smiled, and chirped. “Sorry to disturb you, sir. I’m Faith,
   this kid is Foster…”

   “Hey!” I blurted “Quit calling me a kid! I’m thirteen, already.”

   “…and he,” Faith said, tugging on Gramps’ sleeve, “is Gramps. We want…”

   Gramps scowled and yanked his arm away from her grip. “I’m not your
   grandfather,” he snapped. “And Foster, you can stop calling me that, too.
   I’m not your grandfather either. I just want you both to call me by my
   first name.”

   “I can’t do that,” I said. “It sounds like a girl’s name.”

   Faith sighed. “OK, OK, Gramps! Whatever.”

   Our voices echoed off the concrete walls. The Chinese-American Playful
   Friendship Society was in a basement, down a set of stairs, at the end of
   a hallway – More creepy than playful.

   But Faith looked up at the ogre like he was a hill she intended to climb.
   “What we want is…”

   Peering around the man’s legs, I could see through the open door. It was a
   large room with square tables scattered about, restaurant style. Around
   the tables there were folding chairs and in the chairs sat old people,
   many Chinese-looking but some other races, too. It seemed like they were
   playing a game with tiles that looked like dominoes except they were
   white.

   Then I noticed they had all stopped playing and every face in the room had
   turned toward the door. The whole place was looking at us. Then, just as
   quickly, they all began grabbing piles of money off the tables and
   stuffing it all into their pockets.

   Faith had leaned to the man’s other side to see what I was looking at.

   “Hey! What’s going on in there?”

   “None of your business.”

   The man’s lips curled again, showing yellowed teeth. There was spit at the
   corners of his mouth. He stuck his ugly face close to Gramps and said,
   “What do you want?”

   I caught a whiff of his foul breath. Gramps made a face like he was about
   to gag.

   “We’re looking for Mr. Wong,” I said.

   “Never heard of him,” the man replied with a dismissive wave. “Now get
   lost or you’ll be sorry.”

   He turned and went back inside, slamming the door in our faces. The three
   of us hurried down the hallway and up the stairs, back to the safety of
   the sidewalk and Mott Street, in the middle of Chinatown.

   Faith, who is hard to scare, said, “That was scary.”

   Gramps shook his head. “This isn’t worth it. Let’s go home.”

   I shrugged. “I’m with Gramps.”

   “No,” Faith said. “I’ve solved every puzzle my dad has ever given me. I’m
   not going to let him down now.”

   “But …your dad’s dead,” I said. “You couldn’t let him down if you wanted
   to.” It wasn’t the most helpful thing to say. It just came out.

   Faith winced. Her eyes flooded and her cheeks flushed.

   “That’s low. Don’t make me hate you.” She looked away. That’s one thing I
   don’t like about girls. They cry when they hate you. They should just hit
   you. Then you’d know what to do.

   When she turned back her nose was a little red but she was sort of
   grinning. “You know what? You guys are cowards. What can he do to us?”

   “For sure, kill us with his breath,” I suggested.

   “Did you see those hands?” said Gramps. “He could pop my head like a
   pimple.”

   Faith folded her arms and her eyes narrowed. “How did we get here,
   anyway?”

   We were on a mission. The man at the antiques shop said he only deals in
   furniture and art so he told us that Mr. Wong on Mott Street could help
   us. Faith had some old documents her mom gave her that had belonged to her
   dad. We wanted to find someone who could explain them to us.

   Now what? We all stared at the pavement for a moment while Chinatown
   bustled around us. Seemed like we’d hit a dead end.

   “Let’s take a vote,” I suggested. “Who thinks we should just catch the
   next ferry boat home and forget about it?”

   Gramps nodded right away. “An excellent idea. I second that motion.”

   Faith glared at Gramps, then at me. Then her face crumpled and the tears
   really began. “I don’t believe you two. You’re both cowards. Anyway,
   you’re overruled. I’m going back in.”

   She turned and dashed back down the stairs.

   Gramps yelled after her, into the concrete echo chamber. “How do you think
   you’re gonna get home on your own, young lady?”

   Faith hesitated at the bottom of the stairs, and then shouted. “I’ll solve
   that problem later, old man. Right now I’m going to find Mr. Wong.” She
   disappeared through the doorway.

   I looked at Gramps. He looked at me. We were both clueless.

   “How is Faith going to get home alone?”

   “She can’t,” he said. “She doesn’t have any money.”

   “So, now what do we do?”

   Gramps sighed. “We’ll just have to wait for her, I guess.”

   I had a bad feeling about that place, and about Faith being in danger.

   “I’m going back in there too, Gramps. You can wait for both of us.”

   I dashed off to catch up.

  February 29, 2020

   Okay, I guess the first thing you should know is that two years ago, when
   I was in fifth grade, my mom killed herself. Now that I’ve said it I
   really don’t want to talk about it.

   It was just really hard and my dad thought it would be better if I did
   sixth grade in one of those fancy private schools. I flunked.

   Going back to public school was okay. I was repeating the year and had
   seen most of the lessons before. I was a year older than the other kids so
   I was able to stand out in gym class.

   That’s one thing I like — sports. I also like writing, which I have in
   common with my dad. He works as a writer and he’s really good about
   helping me get better at it.

   After I’m done with school I want to be a soldier like my mom was and a
   writer like my dad. I could be a soldier who writes about war; who doesn’t
   want to read about war:

   We live in a decrepit two-story apartment house in New Jersey in a small
   town that overlooks the bay where the Atlantic Ocean meets the Hudson
   River — New York Harbor. There are four apartments, two on each floor.

   My dad and I live on the first floor. Faith and her mother, Hope, live
   above us. Gramps lives across the hall from them. He’s really old, in his
   60’s anyway. His wife was killed in a car crash five years ago. He was so
   broken up over it that he hasn’t worked since. Sometimes I’ve felt that
   hopeless, like after my mom died.

   Below Gramps, on the first floor across from us, is Bonnie’s apartment.
   Bonnie owns the building. She’s older than Gramps. I’m pretty sure she was
   a hippie back in the day cause she’s a really old hippie now.

   The place is so run down because Bonnie doesn’t charge us all enough rent
   to pay for repairs. She always says, “I believe poor people should be able
   to live in beautiful places, too.” I don’t think about whether we’re poor
   or not, especially when I can walk out on our deck and enjoy a
   million-dollar view of New York City.

   My dad is Puerto Rican, born in New York, but he can easily pass for
   European. My mom was a quarter Japanese, half African-American, and a
   quarter Indonesian. She enlisted in the army when she graduated from
   junior college. She got promotions and made it to sergeant major before
   she killed herself. Like I said before, I don’t want to talk about it.

   My dad says I’m a mutt. I have curly jet black hair and kind of a
   permanent tan. Some people treat me like I’m exotic and try to guess my
   genetic mix.

   Last August Faith and her mom, Hope, moved into the apartment above my dad
   and me. I hardly ever saw her except in class and once in a while on the
   stairs.

   We’re both in Ms. Rieur’s sixth grade class. The way to pronounce her name
   is “RE-your.” Ms. Rieur is such a great teacher; the best I’ve ever had.
   That doesn’t mean I like school, but I like her.

   When school started last September, I didn’t know much about Faith other
   than her hair was blonde from a summer spent in the sun and it got darker
   in the fall. She kept to herself and she was a really good student. Too
   good. She always had the answers and that made the rest of us look bad. I
   didn’t hate her, but I didn’t like her much.

   The week before we went looking for Mr. Wong in New York City, Faith’s mom
   invited my dad and me to their apartment. It was Faith’s twelfth year of
   life, but only her third actual birthday. She was born in a leap year, on
   the 29th of February.

   Faith wasn’t my friend so I didn’t want to go. All my friends are guys and
   none of them were friends with her either. But dad said that since the
   poor girl didn’t have any friends, not even other girls, we should go.

   There wasn’t time to go buy a gift. So I looked around my bedroom to see
   if there was anything I had that I could use as a present. I immediately
   latched on to a toy AK-47 machine gun that someone gave me. It was green
   and orange plastic and looked lame, a toy for a baby. I never even opened
   the box so it still looked brand new. I wrapped it up to give to Faith.

   “Really weird gift for a girl,” my dad said.

   “You’re stereotyping,” I said. “They told us at school you’re not supposed
   to do that. Besides, Mom was a soldier.”

   That had nothing to do with why I gave Faith the green and orange plastic
   AK-47. It was because I hated it and figured I’d save a couple of dollars
   I’d have spent on something even more lame.

   There were twice as many adults as kids at Faith’s big leap year birthday
   party. The parents ignored the kids, and everyone ignored Faith. I mostly
   talked to Stuart, the only friend of mine who was there.

   Finally it was time to blow out the candles and open her presents, which
   Faith did without much enthusiasm. When she opened mine she started to
   cry.

   “I’d rather be dead than twelve!” she bawled. She ran to her room and
   slammed the door. Her mom tried to talk her out but Faith just kept
   shouting, “Go away!”

   So everyone did.

   Back downstairs in my bedroom, which was right below Faith’s, I could hear
   her mother pleading, “Come on, baby, it’s okay. Just let me in.” And then,
   later, in a sharper tone, “Listen here, young lady. You open this door
   right now.”

   Finally, “Okay. If that is the way it is you’re not getting any dinner.”

   Dad went down to The Sudsey Pitcher on Fourth Street to get something to
   eat and probably flirt with a waitress there that he liked. I made a
   sandwich for myself and got the idea to make a second one for Faith.

   I didn’t really want to knock on their door and have an awkward moment
   with her mother. Instead I climbed up some sturdy vines that had taken
   over the back wall of the building.

   I peered through the glass of Faith’s window.. She was on her bed, lying
   on her back, arms folded, staring at the ceiling. When I knocked on the
   window pane she bolted upright, looked at me, and mouthed something I
   couldn’t hear, probably WTF.

   She got off the bed and was laughing as she came toward the window. Her
   mouth was still moving but I couldn’t hear a word, even though she looked
   like she was shouting.

   “Open the friggin’ window!” I yelled.

   She did and her lips were still moving but no sound was coming out. Then
   she began laughing kind of hysterically. It was totally weird.

   “What are you trying to say?”

   “I haven’t been trying to say anything,” said Faith. “I’ve just been
   moving my lips. I was trying to get you to yell ‘Open the friggin’
   window.’ So, mission accomplished.” Then she laughed some more.

   WTF?

   “I’m sorry. I’m laughing at you. It’s not fair. Anyway, the answer is no.”

   “No? The answer is ‘no’ to what?”

   “No, I won’t marry you,” she said. “I assume you’ve brought me roses or
   something, climbing up to my window like some kind of Romeo, and going to
   ask me to marry you. So the answer is ‘no’. I hardly know you and I refuse
   your hand in marriage.’”

   Clutching the sill with one hand, I held out the sandwich with the other.
   “I don’t know what the heck you’re talking about but here. I made you a
   ham sandwich.”

   “OK,” she said brightly. “In that case, the answer is ‘yes.’”

   “Here,” I said, holding out the sandwich, “Take it.”

   “Why?”

   “Because I offered you a ham sandwich and you said ‘Yes.’”

   “No,” she said, “You didn’t offer me a ham sandwich. You said you made me
   a ham sandwich. I didn’t say ‘yes’ to the ham sandwich because you didn’t
   ask me if I wanted it.

   “And I’ve reconsidered my other answer. It would be my pleasure to marry
   you. Roses are a cliché, but a ham sandwich? That’s something. Nothing is
   better than complete happiness in life. And, a ham sandwich is better than
   nothing. Why would I turn down a marriage proposal from a cute kid who’s
   offering me something better than complete happiness in life?”

   This girl is crazy, I thought. “You’re crazy, you know. I’m not going to
   marry you.” I should have left it at that and retreated back down the
   vines to my room. But there was something about her that kept me there.

   “Of course we’re not going to marry! Not now. We’re too young. That comes
   in Act Three. This is Act One.”

   I didn’t know what to say. “I don’t know what to say.”

   “No problem, my dad and I invented a game exactly for this situation. Want
   to learn?”

   “Do I have a choice?”

   “Of course not.” She winked. “The game is called Lines. As in lines in a
   play or a movie. When actors forget what they’re supposed to say next,
   there’s a person with the script who sits down front, at the foot of the
   stage where the audience can’t see them but the actors can. This person is
   called a prompter.

   “The prompter has a copy of the script in case one of the actors forgets
   the next thing to say. The actor whispers, “Line,” and the prompter
   whispers the next words they’re supposed to say from the script.

   “Whenever my dad and I would talk, if one of us didn’t know what to say
   next, we’d just say, “Line,” and the other one would tell them what they
   could say and we’d keep talking. This is a perfect situation for playing
   Line.”

   “I have no idea what you just said.”

   “Of course not. That’s because you’re an idiot. But don’t worry. I’ll
   never give up on you because you are my idiot; the man I’ll marry one day.
   And you look like an idiot hanging on to those vines outside my window.”

   My head was spinning. “I really don’t know what I’m supposed to say.”

   “Good. So that’s when you’re supposed to say, ‘Line.’”

   “Okay. Line.”

   “Good. Your next line is, ‘May I come in?’ Don’t mess it up. Just say the
   words. ‘May I come in?’”

   I felt stupid but I was trapped. “I don’t know why I am saying this but,
   ‘May I come in?’”

   She glared. “You don’t know why you are saying it? I just explained.
   Obviously you live a life without purpose. Let me give you one. Your
   purpose is to make me happy.”

   “What the…?”

   “Your goal is to make me happy. And, in order to make me happy you must
   not make me angry. Now repeat what I just said.”

   I clung to the vines regretting the impulse to make her that dumb
   sandwich. The only way out was to play along while I planned an escape.

   “Go ahead,” Faith insisted. “Say it!”

   “Okay, okay! Mygoalistomakeyouhappy and…. I can’t remember the rest.”

   She huffed impatiently. “‘And in order to do that I must never ever make
   you angry.’”

   I was embarrassed and a hot wave of anger surged through me. But when I
   repeated her words, I felt kind of good. It was weird and confusing.

   “Good,” Faith said triumphantly. “Now we’re getting somewhere. Another
   rule of the game is that you must not always do what I say. If you do, I
   won’t respect you. Every so often you must make me angry. Otherwise it’s
   no fun.”

   “That’s just…That’s crazy! You’re not making any sense.”

   “Who cares,” she shrugged “Do you like football? Those rules don’t make
   any sense either. They are just rules. This game’s no fun if the other
   person doesn’t make you angry every so often. That’s because of the next
   rule, which is that if you make someone angry you have to make it up to
   them.”

   “What game is this,” I said sarcastically.

   “It’s called Marriage,” she said, all matter-of-fact. “Actually, it’s
   technically Pre-Marital Marriage since we aren’t yet married. Afterwards,
   when we’re married, it’s just called Marriage. But you have to be good at
   Pre-Marital Marriage first or marriage is no fun.”

   It felt like I’d been hanging on to the vine listening to this nonsense
   forever, and the vine was starting to peel away from the bricks. I had to
   hold onto the sill or risk falling and probably break my neck.

   For some reason — it just popped into my head — I said, “This is where you
   need a good line.”

   “What!” Her eyes widened.

   “You heard me. ‘Repeat after me,’ right? Say it. Say, ‘Line.’”

   “Line.”

   I suddenly felt righteous. “Your line is, ‘Of course, you can come in. I
   was wondering when you would ask.’”

   She laughed. “Of course you can come in. I was wondering when you would
   ask.”

   To get in through her window I had to push against the vine and that made
   it tear away from the bricks. I just made it in the window as it fell into
   the yard with a soft swoosh, making a racket as it knocked over some
   garbage cans.

   Faith helped pull me in but then she fell backward and I tumbled into the
   room, right on top of her, with a loud “Oof!”

   Instead of pushing me off, she wrapped her arms around me and squeezed.
   Geez! The only people who ever hugged me in my whole life were my mom and
   my grandmother. This was different.

   I stuttered, and then I remembered. “Line.”

   I could feel her breath on my neck.

   “Your line is, ‘Unhand me you fool.’”

   “Unhand me you fool.”

   “But, you’re the fool,” she teased. “You’re on top of me.”

   I rolled off and lay beside her in silence. She said nothing. Out of
   nowhere, hot tears began to quiver in my eyes. I felt ashamed, insulted,
   exposed. I wasn’t into girls yet. But I really wanted Faith to like me. I
   was multiple kinds of embarrassed.

   We lay next to each other on the floor like that for what felt like
   forever. All the energy drained out of me. I was just really, really
   tired.

   Then I felt Faith hand stroking my hair. I turned to look at her. Her eyes
   were wet, too.

   Finally she said, “The rules of Pre-Marital Marriage work both ways. My
   goal is to make you happy, and I must not make you angry. But, I just did,
   so now I must make it up to you.”

   She hadn’t done anything yet, but just hearing her say that made me feel
   safe, even happy. In fact, I cannot remember ever being happier,
   especially not after what’s happened since.

   We gazed into each other’s faces until there was a loud knock on her
   bedroom door.

   “Honey?” It was her mother’s muffled voice. “You Okay?”

   “I’m fine,” she called out. “Don’t worry.”

   “I heard a lot of noise. Are you sure? Is everything okay?”

   “I just said everything is fine.”

   “And, I heard someone yell something. About opening a window.”

   “You must have been hearing things. It’s nothing.”

   A long pause. Then her mother said. “Honey, I’m sure it was ‘things.’ That
   kid from downstairs was just hanging outside your window.”

   “Whatever, Mom.”

   “It looked like you were having a conversation. I thought to myself,
   ‘Isn’t that nice!’ But now Bonnie’s vines are all over the backyard and
   there’s trash everywhere.”

   “Where is this going, Mom?” Faith rolled her eyes.

   “I just don’t want to find out tomorrow that that boy spent the night in
   your room.”

   “Oh-kay, Mom.”

   “Thanks, dear. I know I can count on you.”

   Faith mouthed, She’s crazy.

   “Oh, and by the way, honey. You ran away from the party before I could
   give you a special present. Your dad left it for me to give you — on your
   twelfth birthday. I have no idea what it is. I remember he told me it was
   something he got from his grandmother and it was some kind of big secret.
   I’ll just leave it here by the door.”

   After we heard her footsteps receding Faith got up and went to the door.
   She slowly opened it just a crack, enough to reach out and grab a large,
   fat envelope.

   I sat up. “What was that all about?”

   “My mom said that you can spend the night with me.”

   I barked a laugh. “Nuh-uh! I just heard her.”

   She shook her head. “You heard. But you didn’t understand. She said she
   didn’t want to find out tomorrow morning that you spent the night. Now
   we’re playing a game called Plausible Deniability.”

   “What the hell is that?”

   “Oh, everyone plays that game all the time,” she said. “Just most people
   don’t know it. See, my dad was a game designer back before he got cancer.
   He was big into understanding the games people play. You’ll see.

   “You’ll spend the night with me, and then tomorrow morning you’ll have to
   go home through the living room since you can’t go back the way you came.
   I’ll ask my mom if she needs to run an errand. Then she’ll leave and you
   can go home through the front door.”

   “You’re completely crazy and I’m not spending the night with some girl.
   I’ve got to go home.”

   “Fine. Leave.”

   I followed her eyes to the window and then to the door. It was like she
   was reading my mind. I did not want to explain myself to her mom. “What am
   I going to do?”

   “You are going to stay here tonight, then in the morning you are going to
   go home.”

   “But, what if I don’t want to stay?”

   “You don’t always get what you want. If you stay the night then I’ll get
   what I want, so at least one of us will be happy.”

   “But, what about me,” I said, “I want to be happy, too.”

   She looked me right in the eyes. Hers were bright blue, like miniature
   earths. I started to get tingly feelings down my back. I looked away and
   the feelings went away. I looked back at her and she was still looking at
   me, so I looked away again. This time the tingling didn’t stop. Faith was
   really cute.

   That new feeling was kinda nice, like when you open a present that’s
   exactly what you were hoping for but didn’t expect. It was like that, only
   it kept rolling on.

   Faith shook me out of the zone. “Are you done yet?”

   “Am I done with what?”

   “Are you done with whatever is going on in there?” She poked my forehead
   with her index finger.

   “What?” My shame and embarrassment was starting to melt away. I was
   feeling kind of feisty now.

   “It would make me happy if you stayed,” she said. “And I know it would
   make you happy if you left. Now since I want to make you happy, it would
   also make me happy if you left. Either way, I’m happy if you stay and I’m
   happy if you go, or if I never see you again — if that’s what will make
   you happy.

   “You see, I’m a happy-go-lucky girl, and by that I mean I am lucky that
   you have made me happy, so you can go. So, don’t worry about me. Are you
   following this?”

   No. “Yes, I’m following you,” I said. I didn’t want any more sentences to
   try to untangle, or to have to learn yet another weird game. But the
   tingle persisted. She really was pretty. But the look on her face warned
   me, Uh-oh! Here she goes again!

   “Now, just so you understand,” she said. “This means that whatever
   happens, you will have fulfilled your life’s purpose, which I need not
   remind you is to make me happy. Even if you leave right now, you can live
   a full life knowing that if I die in the morning and you aren’t here to
   witness it, then you will still have made me happy.”

   All I could do was sigh. Trying to follow her was wearing me out!

   We both fell silent. Faith now was acting 100% like a girl — no one could
   possibly understand what was going on in her head, least of all me. I was
   trapped and confused so I kept my mouth shut. I figured anything I might
   say would just start another twisted idea or game.

   Finally she piped up. “Now, your next line is, ‘Line.’”

   Sigh. “OK. Line.” The tingling got stronger.

   “Your line is, ‘Go on.’ In these circumstances you should never say
   anything except ‘Go on.’ That’s a game my dad and I came up with. It’s
   called Go On. You need to learn when to play Line and when to play Go On
   because they are mutually exclusive.”

   “Huh?”

   “If you play Line when you should be playing Go On you’ll make the other
   person angry and you’ll have to make it up to them even though you have no
   idea how you ever will, because you can’t. Don’t make me explain it
   twice.”

   My brain kind of froze. For the longest time I couldn’t think of anything
   to say. So I said, “Go on.”

   “Good boy,” she said. “You’re learning. My dad says that you can go to
   college and get a degree in Go On. Then you can become a psychotherapist
   who charges people loads of money just for saying, ‘Go on.’”

   I started laughing. I didn’t get the joke but I remembered that after my
   mom killed herself I got really sad and wanted to be left alone. Everyone
   said I was depressed and for about six months my dad sent me to a doctor
   who kept suggesting topics of conversation that didn’t interest me, and
   saying things like, “Go on,” when I didn’t want to; and, “That’s very
   interesting,” without telling me what “that” was.

   Another doctor — a “real” one who told me he didn’t know anything about
   sadness — gave me drugs. He and Dr. Go-On were supposed to work together.
   All I got was fat.

   I quit taking the pills and told my dad I was done with Dr. Go-On. After
   that I felt better and got back in shape. My dad said the therapy must
   have worked.

   Thinking about it all made me sad again. But Faith was smiling at me and I
   felt like something wonderful was bursting inside me. The tingling spread
   all over my body. I had started out thinking she was a hopeless weirdo.
   Now everything she said made me laugh. She was tickling me everywhere,
   even my brain.

   “Foster?”

   “Yeah?”

   “Can I have that ham sandwich now? I’m really starving.”

   She began to devour it in huge mouths-full.

   Her cheeks bulging, she grinned and flashed a thumbs up. “Fank you!”

   “No problem. In fact, I was wondering…If you don’t like the gun I brought
   you, can I have it back?”

   Faith’s mouth was too full to speak. She just gave me a sharp look.

   “I mean, you didn’t seem to like it all that much anyway and it’s a fair
   enough trade — a sandwich for a machine gun. Right?”

   She swallowed to talk. “Wait! You weren’t here to propose marriage? You
   just wanted your toy gun back?”

   “Well…” My face blazed. “Not exactly.”

   Faith nodded. “You mean, exactly yes; that is exactly what you wanted.
   Right? Well, the answer is no. You can’t have it back. Because I don’t
   have a toy gun and now I really want one.” She was down to the last bite.
   “And tomorrow I’ll teach you a cool game we can play with it.”

   “No way! Another game? With a green and orange baby assault rifle?”

   “You’ll find out. For now, do you think you’ll be okay sleeping on the
   floor?”

   I panicked for a second. Line? “Sure.” I was tired. I could sleep anywhere
   and often did.

   The next thing I knew it was the morning of a sunny day.

   Faith was already dressed. She shouted at the closed door, “Mom!”

   A moment later her mother’s muffled voice answered. “Yes, sweetie?”

   “Do you have an errand you need to do or something? Like, now.”

   “Line,” her mother replied.

   “Your line is, ‘I’m going down to the corner to get some milk and a
   newspaper.’”

   “Yes. That’s it. I’m going down to the corner to get some milk and a
   newspaper.”

   We listened for the slam of the front door. Then I walked downstairs to
   our apartment where I found my dad snoring on the living room couch. He
   must have come home buzzed and fell asleep. Probably never noticed me
   being gone.

   I took a shower and by the time I was dressed my dad was awake and having
   his cereal. “Hey, Foster. Good news. I’ve finally caught a new writing
   assignment. The gig is about three weeks and I’ll have to work through the
   weekends. And it’s at their office in the city. You gonna be okay on your
   own?”

   “Sure Dad, I’ll be fine. I always am.”

   After he left I got out the notebook where I write down everything that
   matters. My dad taught me the habit and I’ve been doing it for three years
   now. He said a person can learn a lot from their own life, but if you
   don’t take some notes you’ll be so busy living it that you’ll forget what
   happened.

   “People have interesting lives, whether they think so or not,” he often
   reminded me. “Most aren’t paying attention at the time and have no record
   they can look back on later to reflect and appreciate. I didn’t really
   fall for your mom until I started writing about my impressions of her in
   my notebook.”

   My dad’s idea about taking notes about your life had sounded like homework
   at first. Who cares? Once I started doing it, I realized he was right. And
   now I had Faith to write about.

   Just the day before I thought of her as just an annoying and strange
   person. Now, as I began writing about the stuff she said, and the things
   that happened that night — I started to like her; I mean really like her.

  March 1, 2020

   After I got done with my notes I went back upstairs and knocked on the
   door I’d sneaked out of an hour earlier. Her mom answered, smiling.

   “Hello, Foster. You’ll be wanting Faith.” I followed her to the kitchen
   where Faith was at the table having breakfast.

   “Sit down,” said Faith. “You’ll want some French toast. I was guessing
   you’d come back so I made extra. Oops! I mean I was hoping that after
   yesterday’s party I’d see you again.”

   We both looked at Faith’s mom. She was looking at the newspaper but you
   could see she was stifling a smile.

   “Uh, anything interesting in the news?”

   “This is interesting but scary,” her mom said. “There’s a deadly virus
   that’s been spreading in China and now it’s come here. The first American
   victim just died from it. The President says there’s no reason to panic,
   but the New York Times editorial board says there could be a pandemic
   coming.”

   “What’s a pandemic?”

   Just like in school, Faith had the answers and was eager to share. “It’s
   like an epidemic that spreads everywhere,” she rattled off. “I’ve got a
   game called Pandemic.”

   Of course!

   I’ll teach it to you and then you’ll understand.”

   Damn! I wasn’t done writing in my notebook about the rules for all the
   other games. Now there were more?

   “Okay,” I said. “I’ll bite. Is it fun?”

   She speared another pancake for herself . “That depends. It’s called a
   ‘cooperative game.’ That means no winner. We don’t play against each
   other, we cooperate to see if we can keep the pandemic from killing us
   all.” She finished with a toothy grin.

   “But without a winner, where’s the fun?”

   “Not everything has to be fun.” For a long moment she held my gaze with
   her brilliant blue eyes. She smiled. I got those tingles again. “Some
   games aren’t fun, but they are important.”

   “Uh. Okay.” My head was spinning with word play and games. “Yeah. Okay!”

   Faith’s mom broke the spell. “The French toast is good, don’t you think,
   Foster?”

   I don’t like French toast because of the eggy crust — yuck! But when Faith
   said, “You’ll be wanting French Toast,” I really wanted French toast, like
   she had read my mind.

   “It’s really good,” I said.

   Her mom folded the paper and got up to clear the table. “It tastes good
   because Faith was thinking of you when she made it.”

   Okay. That makes no sense. I like potato chips. They’re made at a factory
   where all they think about is making money. But I was starting to get used
   to things around Faith not making sense, but then sort of making sense in
   a different weird sort of way.

   Faith pushed her empty plate away and then plopped a big envelope that
   she’d had hidden on her lap. “I don’t want to presuppose you’d want to
   help me figure out the puzzle my dad gave me for my birthday.”

   Yes? No! Wait! Presuppose? “No, of course I do.” Whatever presuppose
   means, I definitely wanted to help her with the puzzle, whatever that was.
   Another game?

   “Good. I knew I could count on you.” Faith opened the envelope and dumped
   the contents on the kitchen table — a huge stack of flats sheets of brown
   paper, like the kind used to make paper bags. The sheets had strange
   pictures printed in color and symbols in black.

   “Okay,” I said, “There’s a problem. It’s in Japanese.”

   Faith looked at me and I looked away, but she kept looking at me until I
   couldn’t help myself and I looked back.

   “Put your hand here on the table between us.”

   She put her hand on mine. It felt soft and warm. My neck got hot. I looked
   away.

   “Look at me,” she said. It took a moment, but finally I did. “I am going
   to tell you something that my dad told me that changed my life. When you
   understand what he said, it will change your life too. Do you think you
   can handle it?”

   “Yes,” I croaked with a dry throat.

   “You need to know that there are no problems in the world, only puzzles.”

   “They’re the same thing.”

   “No, they are not the same.” She pressed down on my hand. “Problems are
   not fun. Problems are all in your head. Puzzles are fun. Fun is all in
   your head. Once you realize that there are no problems, only puzzles, then
   the world becomes a lot of fun.”

   “Okay.” Not okay, but WTF? “I don’t get it.”

   “Okay means you understand and agree. But, if the next thing you say is
   that you don’t understand, then nothing makes sense. So I suggest we have
   a new game. Okay, What? In this game, the ‘Okay’ means ‘I heard you’ but
   the ‘What?’ means I don’t understand.”

   “Okay, I really got that.” This was kind of cool and it made me feel
   smart.

   “See!, You just invented a new game: OK, Got It. To recap, OK What? Means
   I heard you but don’t understand and OK, Got it means “I heard you and
   understand.” Cool. Anyway, most people think they have problems but they
   actually don’t. They have complaints. When someone says, ‘Sally doesn’t
   like me,’ that’s a complaint. People have every right to not like you.

   “Now, if you like Sally then you might want Sally to like you back, in
   which case you might have a problem if she doesn’t. Problems are not
   statements; they are questions that can have answers.”

   “You mean like, ‘How do I get Sally to like me?’”

   “Precisely. That’s technically a problem because it is in the form of a
   question that can possibly have an answer.”

   “Except, it’s not a problem because I don’t like girls.”

   “Foster, I’m a girl. Don’t you want me to like you?”

   “Yes. But, you’re different.”

   “Correct, and that’s why you are going to marry me someday. Be that as it
   may, now I’ve forgotten where we were. Line?”

   I hesitated a moment, feeling strangely powerful. “Your line is, ‘Let’s
   figure out this puzzle my dad left for me.’”

   Faith said, “Let’s figure out this puzzle my dad left for me.”

   “Good girl,” I teased. “You’re learning.” Faith chuckled, which thrilled
   me. I’d intentionally tried to make her laugh and it worked..

   “Let’s start with your idea that the writing is Japanese. Is that true?”

   It felt like an accusation. “Are you saying I’m lying?”

   “No. I’m not saying you’re lying, I’m saying your hypothesis might be
   false, or it might be correct. A hypothesis is a statement that is put
   forward as a working assumption but that can be proven false. If your
   hypothesis is wrong I’m not saying anything about you, just your
   hypothesis.

   “You are perfect and that is why some day we’re going to be married. But
   your hypothesis could be a load of BS, which is fine. Most science starts
   with BS, which is okay as long as that’s not where it ends up.”

   “Okay, what?”

   “Chemistry isn’t BS, but alchemy is. If you start with alchemy and apply
   the scientific method you end up with chemistry, which we call a science
   because it uses the scientific method.”

   “Okay, got it.”

   “See how easy it is. Let’s find out if the writing is Japanese or not.”

   “Where did you learn to think like this?”

   “My dad taught me last year, when he was dying and he was home-schooling
   me. Once you get good at it, learning how to think things through is fun,
   and finding the answer to a puzzle is like winning at sports; it feels
   really good.”

   “That was really good. And so were the pancakes.”

   Faith’s mom, Hope, chimed in from where she had been sitting, reading the
   paper. “Everything’s better when you add that secret ingredient called
   love.”

   “That’s a hypothesis,” Faith said. “Foster, you and I will have to try a
   scientific experiment. Let’s put love into everything we do and collect
   data on the results. That way we can test my mom’s hypothesis.”

   “Go on.”

   Faith went to her bedroom and returned with a laptop computer. She looked
   up the Wikipedia entry for the Japanese language. Then she selected one of
   the pieces of paper with the strange writing on it. I took a photo of it
   with my smartphone so you can see it too.

   Faith scanned the Wikipedia entry, reading aloud the main points.

   “Japanese is actually written with many different alphabets. Kanji is
   based on Chinese and the characters look complex. There are two other
   alphabets they use — Hiragana and Katakana — which are simpler. I’d revise
   your hypothesis to say it is probably either Japanese or Chinese, although
   I guess there is a chance other languages look similar.”

   She did some searching and then she picked up her phone and downloaded the
   Google Translate app. She pointed her phone’s camera at the document and
   took a snapshot so I can show you what it looked like.

   “Wow, this is awesome,” Faith said. “My dad was great at making up puzzles
   with so many levels to them. At first, it looks like total gibberish; I
   love it.”

   “OK. What?” I said.

   “The app says it’s Chinese, so it probably is. Then it says ‘Do what I
   do.’ My dad used to say, ‘Do what I do, not what I say.’ He said most
   people say, ‘Do what I say, not what I do.’

   “He said it the other way around because most people do stupid things and
   they know it, which means they know what the right thing is to do. If a
   parent smokes cigarettes and they know it’s unhealthy, they’ll tell their
   kids, ‘Don’t smoke. Do what I say, not what I do.’

   “My dad thought that was dumb. Someone who smokes a pack a day is saying
   by their actions, ‘Smoking is okay.’ They might say it is bad only a few
   times a year, usually only when they catch their kids smoking.

   “My dad didn’t smoke. But one night he reached in his shirt pocket and
   pulled out a cigarette. He said he wanted to see what it’s like to smoke
   so he bummed it from a friend. He lit it, took a puff, and then crushed it
   out on his plate.

   “He said, ‘Now I have taken one puff and that is enough for a lifetime. Do
   what I do, not what I say.’

   “So I took the cigarette off his plate and relit it. I took one puff,
   said, ‘Now I have taken one puff and that is good enough for a lifetime,’
   and put it out.

   “My dad was proud of me and kissed me on the forehead. He and mom never
   said they were proud of me because they believed pride is a sin and
   parental pride is a pernicious sin.

   Gotta look up ‘pernicious.’

   “But when they kissed me on the forehead, I knew it meant they were
   proud.”

   I’d smoked perhaps a few dozen cigarettes in my life because my friends
   said they don’t harm you if you smoke only every so often. But the thought
   occurred to me that maybe I should do what Faith does rather than what my
   friends say.

   Faith stared at her phone. “You know, I’m thinking my dad might have made
   up this puzzle himself. Google Translate is using the little ‘i’ instead
   of the big ‘I.’ I don’t know how he got Google to do that because I don’t
   think there is a word in the English language that is just the letter “i”
   in lowercase.

   This time I was not surprised to hear Faith say, “My dad and I had another
   game called Big I or little i. The idea is that each of us are really two
   people; the person we pretend to be and the person we really are. We’d say
   that the “Big I” refers to the pretend person and the “little i” refers to
   the person we really are.

   “For example, my dad and I might be going for a walk and he’d start
   talking about something I find embarrassing. I might say, ‘I need to go to
   the bathroom.’ He might say, ‘Big I or little i?’

   He meant, Is there something else you want and pretending to need to go to
   the bathroom is just an excuse, or do you really need to go?’ I might say,
   ‘Little i finds this conversation embarrassing and wants a break.’ Or,
   “Little i needs to find a toilet soon or I’ll wet my pants.”

   She peered at her Google translation screen closely.

   “Look at the second line: ‘What’s the matter.’ There’s no question mark.
   When I was upset he would ask, ‘What’s the matter?’ If I told him about
   something I didn’t like he’d say, ‘That’s the complaint. Now, what’s the
   problem?’

   “That’s how he would get me to formulate my complaint in the form of a
   question that could possibly have an answer. Then he’d ask, ‘Where’s the
   fun?’ Once you had a problem formed as a question, he said all you needed
   to do is figure out how to have fun answering it. Then the problem becomes
   a puzzle.”

   “Okay, got it.”

   “So, ‘What’s the matter’ is really my father asking me to state the
   problem, which in this case is, ‘What is he trying to tell me?’ and,
   ‘Where’s the fun?’”

   “Yeah,” I said. “Where is the fun? I want to know.”

   “Is this fun so far?”

   “I have to admit it is fun so far. but there’s no guarantee that it will
   be forever. I’m suspicious.”

   “Suspicious? The thing that makes this fun is that we don’t have to worry
   because it isn’t like a homework assignment; nothing bad will happen if we
   quit when it stops being fun. Now, let’s take a break and go outside and
   play”

   In just two days I had more to write about in my notebook than just about
   everything that had happened to me since my mom died. Faith was making me
   look at things in different ways. For the first time in my life I had
   faith — Faith! — in my future.

   ═════════════════════════════════════════
════════════════════════════════

   Hey there, Foster here.

   This workbook began with Faith saying “On March 1, 2020 two things
   happened that will change the world forever. Are you ready?”

   I know I wasn’t. As I told you above, I take notes on my life and then
   when interesting things happen my dad helps me rewrite it so that you
   might find my story more fun to read.

   He helped me with everything you’ve read so far but there is an awful lot
   that he hasn’t helped me with because he’s gotten sick with the
   coronavirus.

   Just so you have a vague idea of what’s happened, after Sunday, March 1,
   we played some more and then she and I did homework together. Bonnie and
   Gramps came over and, along with Hope, all of us made dinner. They even
   got me to cook potatoes, which is dead simple since all I did was boil
   them and then mash them.

   Sunday is usually “pizza night” for my dad and me. It’s kind of special
   because we seldom eat together, but we always have pizza together on
   Sunday night. However, this particular Sunday dinner was extra special
   because even though we didn’t have pizza, my dad joined us and we all had
   a big fancy home cooked meal together that I helped make.

   The rest of the week I spent a lot of time with Faith. We studied
   together, we played together, and we continued to try to solve the puzzle
   her dad left her. Gramps and Bonnie came every night to cook. If Faith and
   I didn’t have too much homework we helped too. When Hope and my dad got
   home from work they would join us. The way Hope and my dad talked to each
   other was much better than how he normally interacts with the waitress at
   the Sudsy Pitcher.

   It felt wonderful. It is almost like I was part of a big happy family. It
   would have been great if it lasted.

   On Saturday, March 7, Gramps took us into Chinatown to find someone who
   reads Chinese. Eventually, we found Mr. Wong who told us that the
   documents we had were not something Faith’s dad had made up. They were, in
   fact, an authentic copy of something called The Lifewizard Way, which was
   an ancient set of 54 questions from before the time Christ was born. Back
   then children asked the adults The Lifewizard questions to help them
   identify which ones were wise and worth listening to, and which were best
   ignored.

   Mr. Wong translated the first eight of these questions for us. It turns
   out Google translate got it all wrong.

   Mr. Wonbg said that many collectors of documents have heard of The
   Lifewizard Way, but nobody has ever seen an actual copy. That’s why Faith
   could probably sell it for more than a million dollars. Wow!

   That was exciting, but then Mr. Wong said something very scary. He said
   that having good answers to the 54 questions can make you very powerful
   and even wealthy. That’s why people who are already rich and powerful want
   it suppressed. Some of them might stop at nothing to keep The Lifewizard
   Way from ever seeing the light of day. They might even kill Faith and
   destroy her documents.

   When we got home, Faith and I started collecting answers to those first
   eight questions from all the adults we knew, starting with my dad, Hope,
   Gramps and Bonnie. It was really interesting; each of them had different
   philosophies of life. That meant they had different answers to the same
   questions.

   In school the following week Faith showed the eight questions to Ms.
   Rieur. She thought they were wonderful. She made up a Lifewizard Way
   Workbook and on Monday, March 16, she gave a copy to each of the students
   in class and told them to spend a week asking the questions of as many
   adults as they could find.

   But, on that same day, the Governor of New Jersey announced that all the
   schools would be closed on Wednesday and everyone had to work from home.

   Faith asked Ms. Rieur if she would be willing to put the workbook up on
   the internet so that students all over the world could ask the same
   questions of their parents, relatives and adult friends.

   I pointed out to Faith that Mr. Wong said that powerful people didn’t want
   the questions to get out and it might get her killed. She said, “I’m not
   afraid to die. If I were I’d have a hard time crossing the street.
   Besides, if everyone knows the questions then if I get killed it won’t
   stop anything; they’ll just have made me a martyr for the cause, which is
   the last thing anyone wants.”

   Faith is the most amazing person I’ve ever met, don’t you think?

   Anyway, I’ve also got to tell you about my dad. On March 11 I got a sore
   throat and a fever. I went to a doctor and she said it could be the
   coronavirus, but she didn’t have a test so she couldn’t be sure.

   I got better the next day but over the weekend my dad got sick and it hit
   him really hard. By then the hospitals were full so he is at home. I’m
   afraid he is going to die and the worst thing is that if I gave it to him
   that means I killed him.

   I feel terrible.

   Hope says I need faith. Faith says I need hope. Gramps and Bonnie say that
   they will take care of me no matter what so I don’t need to worry. They
   all say worrying is a waste of time. I don’t agree. If I don’t worry then
   it means I don’t care and I won’t figure out what to do.

   They all say that what we have to do is give my dad the will to live. He
   lost his job and they won’t pay him for the work he already did. He’s
   saying things like, “This might be for the best because even though we
   don’t have any savings or health insurance, at least I have life
   insurance.” I hate it when he talks like that.

   Ms. Rieur had a brilliant idea. She said that if I combine my story with
   her Lifewizard Workbook, then maybe I can sell it and make some money for
   the family. Faith said that we could make a website and give it to
   everyone in the world who has been hurt by this virus so they could do the
   same.

   That’s what we’ve done.

   Now it’s your turn.

   What do you want to do?

   Bye for now.

   –- Foster

   P.S. Would you like to hear how this story ends? My dad says that if he
   recovers he’ll be happy to help me put the story into publishable form. He
   says that then we’ll need an agent. I’m not sure what an agent does, but
   if you are one then please write to me and tell me what you do. I’m at:
   [2]Foster@LifewizardWay.com.

   P.P.S. I should tell you that I got help with creating this book from
   Brooke Allen, who claims that the whole idea of The Lifewizard Way is a
   product of his imagination. I don’t believe him and you shouldn’t either.
   Foster Winans helped with editing and layout. Jingyu Sui and Matt Allen
   helped with illustrations.

   ═════════════════════════════════════════
════════════════════════════════

   Hi there. I’m Ms. Jacqueline Rieur and I teach sixth grade.

   I’d like to speak as a professional to the teachers and parents who might
   use this workbook with young people.

   To understand how the questions presented in The Lifewizard Way can be of
   help to a young person it is useful to learn about Erik Erikson’s theory
   of “psycho-social development.” If you haven’t heard of it then a good
   place to start is to look it up in Wikipedia.

   Erikson proposes that from age 12-19 adolescents should be given freedom
   to experiment during a time that he refers to as a “moratorium.” The
   American Psychological Association defines this as “…​the experimental
   period of adolescence in which, during the task of discovering who one is
   as an individual separate from family of origin and as part of the broader
   social context, young people try out alternative roles before making
   permanent commitments to an identity. Adolescents who are unsuccessful at
   negotiating this stage risk confusion over their role in life.”

   For this reason, I think it is vital that young people must not feel they
   are under any pressure to answer the questions of The Lifewizard Way.
   Instead, you can help them solicit answers from the adults around them.
   Here are some suggestions:

   Give people time to answer. Don’t put them on the spot.

   Ask for a story. Stories are better than theoretical answers.

   Encourage conversation in the context of current events. Making answers
   relevant makes them more memorable.

   Don’t expect a young person to do what you wouldn’t. Remember, Faith’s dad
   said: “Do what I do, not what I say.”

   Ask lots of people. Encourage people collecting answers to these questions
   to ask lots of people. These might include: Parents, Grandparents, Other
   relatives, Teachers, Mentors, Neighbors, Friends, Strangers

   Have fun. Fun is pleasure with surprise. Keep it pleasant and the answers
   you collect will be surprising.

   Write down the answers that you collect. You’ll forget if you don’t write
   things down. That’s what the workbook below is for.

   ═════════════════════════════════════════
════════════════════════════════
   ═════════════════════════════════════════
════════════════════════════════

   Faith here: When I started the fourth grade a boy I thought was nice asked
   me, “Who are you?” I’d never thought of it before and so I asked my dad,
   “Who am I?”

   My dad laughed and said, “I can’t tell you who you are. That is for you to
   discover for yourself. I can only tell you who I think I am, if you want.
   Don’t let anyone dictate who you must be and don’t even let them force you
   to answer. You have plenty of time to figure it out; at least until you
   are an adult; even longer if need be.”

     Find someone and ask them to ask themselves,
       “Who am I?”
     and then have them share their answer with you.

     Name:
     Age:
     Relationship:
     Answer:


   ═════════════════════════════════════════
════════════════════════════════
   ═════════════════════════════════════════
════════════════════════════════

   Mr. Wong here: It is interesting that in The Lifewizard Way the symbol
   used for questions about people is the club because it was used both to
   hunt for food for your tribe and to fight against your enemies.

   Faith here: My dad told me that people think it all comes down to the
   boundary between “us” and “them” but what they don’t realize is that we’re
   all “us”. I think this viral pandemic is proving my dad was right.

     Find someone and ask them to ask themselves,
      “Who is important to me?”
     and then have them share their answer with you.

     Name:
     Age:
     Relationship:
     Answer:




   ═════════════════════════════════════════
════════════════════════════════
   ═════════════════════════════════════════
════════════════════════════════

   Ms. Rieur here:

   Albert Einstein said, “Any fool can know. The point is to understand.”
   Today with the internet you don’t have to “know” much since a search
   engine will tell you nearly anything that you want to know.

   Foster here:

   My dad says that he thinks the reason my mom killed herself was because
   although she knew how to be a good soldier, she did not understand why she
   was killing the people who she was killing.

     Find someone and ask them to ask themselves,
       “What do I need to understand?”
     and then have them share their answer with you.

     Name:
     Age:
     Relationship:
     Answer:
   ═════════════════════════════════════════
════════════════════════════════
   ═════════════════════════════════════════
════════════════════════════════

   Faith here: My dad said that if you want to know what people really want
   then you should look at what they do. For example, he said, people who
   say, “I want to quit smoking” but still smoke don’t really want to quit
   strongly enough to actually quit.

   Ms. Rieur here: I have the same thing with students who said, “I wanted to
   do the homework but there was a show that I watched instead.” They don’t
   really mean what they said.

     Find someone and ask them to ask themselves,
       “What do I want to do?”
     and then have them share their answer with you.

     Name:
     Age:
     Relationship:
     Answer:



   ═════════════════════════════════════════
════════════════════════════════
   ═════════════════════════════════════════
════════════════════════════════

   Ms. Rieur here: Science shows that one of the best ways to avoid
   depression is to get in the habit of counting your blessings.

   Faith here: My dad said that if you can wake up each morning glad to be
   alive and go to bed grateful for another day’s life then you can survive
   everything. Even though he died when I was young, my last words to him
   were, “I cannot believe my good fortune to have gotten a chance to spend
   time with you. Thank you so much.”

     Find someone and ask them to ask themselves,
       “What am I grateful for
          and how do I give thanks?”
     and then have them share their answer with you.

     Name:
     Age:
     Relationship:
     Answer:


   ═════════════════════════════════════════
════════════════════════════════
   ═════════════════════════════════════════
════════════════════════════════

   Faith here: When I was nine my dad said to me, “There are two things you
   must know. The first is that there is no such thing as fairness, and the
   second is that you must be fair.” I’d just watched a nature video of a
   lion eating a baby gazelle. I said, “That’s so unfair.” My dad said, “So,
   you would have lions starve to death.”

   My dad said that there is no idea of “fairness” in nature; that it is a
   human invention, and that most people will judge you by how fair you are
   with them.

     Find someone and ask them to ask themselves,
       “What does fairness mean to me?”
     and then have them share their answer with you.

     Name:
     Age:
     Relationship:
     Answer:


   ═════════════════════════════════════════
════════════════════════════════
   ═════════════════════════════════════════
════════════════════════════════

   Faith here: Before he died my dad said, “If you have what you need then
   you are well off. If you don’t have what you need you are poor. If you
   have more than you need then you are wealthy. Measure your wealth by how
   much you have left over for others.”

   He also said, “Time is the great equalizer; we each get 24 hours in a day.
   The wealthiest people are the ones who have time left over for others.”
   Hopefully, you will find people wealthy enough to have time to answer
   these questions.

     Find someone and ask them to ask themselves,
       “Where do the things I want come from?”
     and then have them share their answer with you.

     Name:
     Age:
     Relationship:
     Answer:


   ═════════════════════════════════════════
════════════════════════════════
   ═════════════════════════════════════════
════════════════════════════════

   Ms. Rieur here: My grandfather, Jack, was an amazing teacher and he told
   me to beware of using grades to motivate students. It is much better to
   get them to love learning how the world works because it is fun and
   rewarding for its own sake. Also, he taught me to teach my students that
   it is important that all of us pass on to others what we learn because
   otherwise civilization ceases to advance. Helping others when we can, even
   if there is no explicit reward, is crucial both for our own self-esteem
   and also for the advancement of mankind.

     Find someone and ask them to ask themselves,
       “What will I do only if rewarded?
         What will I do for its own sake?”
     and then have them share their answer with you.

     Name:
     Age:
     Relationship:
     Answer:


   ═════════════════════════════════════════
════════════════════════════════
   ═════════════════════════════════════════
════════════════════════════════

  A conversation between the main characters.

   Ms. Rieur: As your sixth grade teacher, how would you explain The
   Lifewizard Way?

   Faith: My dad died from cancer last year. For my 12th birthday he left me
   a big envelope full of antique documents.

   Foster: I live downstairs from Faith and together we tried to figure them
   out. But they were in Chinese so we went looking for an expert to help.

   Mr. Wong: When Faith and Foster first brought the documents to me I knew
   immediately they were The Lifewizard Way, which I’d heard about since my
   youth growing up in Hong Kong. They include a series of 54 questions that
   were formulated thousands of years ago and that have been lost since 1067.

   Ms. Rieur: What are the questions used for?

   Mr. Wong: In old times children were allowed to play when they were young.
   When they turned 12 the exceptional children were approached and taught
   The Way of the Lifewizard, which involved finding good answers to 54
   questions about yourself, other people, the world and your work.
   Adolescents in those days were told to ask the questions of the adults
   around them in order to decide who was wise and who was best ignored.

   Ms. Rieur: Faith, why did you decide to release these questions? Some
   powerful people might stop at nothing to suppress them?

   Faith: Precisely because of that. If I tell everyone about The Lifewizard
   Way, what can they do to me? If they kill me they will just make a martyr
   out of me. During this global pandemic it is important that we all think
   about the questions posed in The Lifewizard Way.

   Ms. Rieur: Why did you decide to allow people to print and sell this
   workbook for a profit without giving you royalties.

   Faith: Because it is one way we can help all the people and businesses
   that have been hurt. There are instructions inside the front cover that
   tell you what you can and cannot do with this work.

   Ms. Rieur: Foster, you are writing a book about your experiences, are you
   not?


   Foster: Yes I am, and my dad is helping me. He’s out of work so if there
   is a literary agent who wants to help us find a publisher we hope they
   will write to us at: [2]Foster@LifewizardWay.com.

   Ms. Rieur: Thank you so much and best of luck to you all.









   Last updated 2020-05-03 14:07:13 +0200
   ═════════════════════════════════════════
════════════════════════════════

References

   Visible links
   1. https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/
   2. mailto:Foster@lifewizardway.com