GOPHERSPACE.DE - P H O X Y
gophering on sdf.org
!4.03 Lacerations of the Mouth

Presentation
------------
Because of the rich vascularity of the soft tissues of the mouth, impact
injuries often lead to dramatic hemorrhages that send patients to the
emergency department with relatively trivial lacerations. Blunt trauma to
the face can cause secondary lacerations of the lips, frenulum, buccal
mucosa, gingiva, and tongue. Active bleeding has usually stopped by the time
a patient with a minor laceration has reached the emergency department.

What to do:
-----------
 * Provide appropriate tetanus prophylaxis and check for associated injuries
   such as loose teeth, mandibular or facial fractures .
 * When only small lacerations are present and only minimal gaping of the
   wound occurs, reassurance and simple aftercare is all that is required.
   Let the patient know the wound will become somewhat uncomfortable and
   covered with pus over the next 48 hours and tell him to rinse with
   lukewarm water or half strength hydrogen peroxide after meals and every
   one to two hours while awake for one week.
 * If there is continued bleeding, the wound edges gape significantly or
   there is a flap or deformity when the underlying musculature contracts,
   the wound should be anesthetized using lidocaine with epinephrine,
   cleansed thoroughly with saline and loosely approximated using a 4-0 or
   5-0 absorbable suture. Consider using conscious sedation when suturing
   children who cannot cooperate. A traction stitch or special rubber-tipped
   clamp can be very helpful when attempting to suture the tongue of a small
   child or intoxicated adult. The same aftercare as above applies.
 * When the exterior surface of the lip is lacerated, any separation of the
   underlying musculature must be repaired with buried absorbable sutures. 
   To avoid an unsightly scar when the lip heals, precise skin approximation 
   is very important. One must first approximate the vermilion border, 
   making this the key suture. Fine non-absorbable suture material (e.g., 
   6-0 nylon or Prolene) is most appropriate for the skin surfaces of the 
   lip while a fine absorbable suture (e.g., 6-0 Dexon or Vicryl) is quite
   acceptable on the mucosa and vermilion.
 * For deep lacerations of the mucosa or lip, or any sutured laceration in 
   the mouth, prescribe prophylactic penicillin (penicillin VK 500mg tid x 
   3-4 days) to prevent deep tissue infections (erythromycin may be 
   substituted in penicillin-allergic individuals). Recommend acetaminophen 
   for pain.
 * Have patients return in 48 hours for a wound re-evaluation.
 * Recommend cool liquids and soft foods beginning four hours after the 
   repair.

What not to do:
---------------
 * Do not bother to repair a simple laceration or avulsion of the frenulum 
   of the upper lip. It will heal quite nicely on its own.
 * Do not use non-absorbable suture material on the tongue, gingiva or 
   buccal mucosa. There is no advantage and suture removal on a small child
   will be an unpleasant struggle at best.

Discussion
----------
Imprecise repair of the vermilion border will lead to a "step-off" or
puckering that is unsightly and difficult to repair later on. Fortunately,
the tongue and oral mucosa usually heals with few complicating infections
and there is a low risk of subsequent tissue necrosis.

-----------------------------------------------------
from Buttaravoli & Stair: COMMON SIMPLE EMERGENCIES ©
Longwood Information LLC 4822 Quebec St NW Washington DC 20016-3229
1.202.237.0971 fax 1.202.244.8393 electra@clark.net
-----------------------------------------------------