GOPHERSPACE.DE - P H O X Y
gophering on sdf.org
!3.14 Mononucleosis (Glandular Fever)

Presentation
------------
The patient is usually of school age (nursery through night school) and 
complains of several days of fever, malaise, lassitude, myalgias, and 
anorexia, culminating in a severe sore throat. The physical examination is 
remarkable for generalized lymphadenopathy, including the anterior and 
posterior cervical chains and huge tonsils, perhaps meeting in the midline and 
covered with a dirty-looking exudate. There may also be palatal petechiae and 
swelling, splenomegaly, hepatomegaly, and a diffuse maculopapular rash.

What to do:
-----------
 * Perform a complete physical examination, looking for signs of other 
   ailments, and the rare complication of airway obstruction, encephalitis, 
   hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenic purpura, myocarditis, pericarditis, 
   hepatitis, and rupture of the spleen.
 * Send off blood tests: a differential white cell count (looking for 
   atypical lymphocytes) and a heterophil or monospot test. Either of these 
   tests, along with the generalized lymphadenopathy, confirms the diagnosis 
   of mononucleosis, but atypical lymphocytes are less specific, being present 
   in several viral infections.
 * Culture the throat. Patients with mononucleosis harbor group A 
   streptococcus and require penicillin with about the same frequency as 
   anyone else with a sore throat.
 * Warn the patient that the convalescence is longer than that of most viral 
   illnesses (typically 2-4 weeks, occasionally more), and that he should seek 
   attention in case of lightheadedness, abdominal or shoulder pain,or any 
   other sign of the rare complications above.
 * Despite controversy, prednisolone is widely employed for symptomatic 
   relief of infectious mononucleosis, usually 40mg of Prednisone qd for five 
   days. It is particularly helpful in young adults with severe pharyngeal 
   pain, odynophagia or marked tonsillar enlargement with impending 
   oropharyngeal obstruction.
 * Arrange for medical followup.

What not to do:
---------------
 * Do not routinely give penicillin for the pharyngitis, and certainly do not 
   give ampicillin. In a patient with mononucleosis, ampicillin can produce an 
   uncomfortable rash, which, incidentally, does not imply allergy to 
   ampicillin.
 * Do not unnecessarily frighten the patient about splenic rupture. If the 
   spleen is clinically enlarged, he should avoid contact sports, but 
   spontaneous ruptures are rare.

Discussion
----------
All of the above probably apply to cytomegalovirus as well, although the 
severe tonsillitis and positive heterophil test are both less likely. Some who 
report having mono twice probably actually had CMV once and mono once.

-----------------------------------------------------
from Buttaravoli & Stair: COMMON SIMPLE EMERGENCIES ©
Longwood Information LLC 4822 Quebec St NW Washington DC 20016-3229
1.202.237.0971 fax 1.202.244.8393 electra@clark.net
-----------------------------------------------------