GOPHERSPACE.DE - P H O X Y
gophering on sdf.org
!3.08 Epistaxis (Nosebleed)

Presentation
------------
A patient generally arrives in the emergency department with active bleeding 
from his nose or spitting up blood that is draining into his throat. There may 
or may not be a report of minor trauma such as sneezing, nose blowing or nasal 
manipulation. On occasion the hemorrhage has stopped but the patient is 
concerned because the bleeding has been recurring over the past few hours or 
days. Bleeding is most commonly visualized on the anterior aspect of the nasal 
septum within Kiesselbach's plexus. The anterior end of the inferior turbinate 
is another site where bleeding can be seen. Often, especially with posterior 
hemorrhaging, a specific bleeding site cannot be discerned.

What to do:
-----------
 * If significant blood loss is suspected, gain vascular access and administer 
   crystalloid intravenous solution.
 * Have the patient maintain compression on the nostrils by pinching with a 
   gauze sponge while you assemble all equipment and supplies at the bedside. 
   Inform the patient that you will be controlling the bleeding in a stepwise 
   fashion.
 * Have the patient sit upright (unless hypotensive) Sedate the patient if 
   necessary with a mild tranquilizer such as hydroxyzine (Vistaril) or 
   midazolam (Versed). Cover the patient and yourself to protect your clothes. 
   Wear gloves.
 * Prepare 5 ml of 4% cocaine solution or a 1:1 mixture of tetracaine 2% 
   (Pontocaine) for local anesthesia and epinephrine 1:1000 or pseudophedrine 
   1% (Neo-Synephrine) for vasoconstriction.
 * Form two elongated cotton pledgets and soak them in the solution.
 * Use a bright headlight or head mirror to free up hour hands and help 
   insure good visualization.
 * Have the patient blow the clots from his nose and quickly inspect for a 
   bleeding site using a nasal speculum and Frazier suction tip. Clear out any 
   additional clots or foreign bodies.
 * Insert the medicated cotton pledgets as far back as possible into both 
   nostrils.
 * Have the patient relax with the pledgets in place for approximately 5-10 
   minutes. You may use this lull to ask the patient about any past history of 
   nosebleeds or other bleeding problems, the pattern of this nosebleed, which 
   side the bleeding seems to be coming from, any aspirin or blood thinning 
   medication, and any significant medical or surgical problems.
 * In the vast majority of cases, active bleeding will stop with this 
   treatment. The cotton pledgets can be removed and the nasal cavity can be 
   inspected using a nasal speculum and head lamp. If bleeding continues, 
   insert another pair of medicated cotton pledgets.
 * If the bleeding point can be located, cauterize a l cm area of mucosa 
   around the bleeding site with a silver nitrate stick and then cauterize the 
   site itself. Observe the patient for 15 minutes. If this stops the 
   bleeding, cover the cauterized area with antibiotic ointment and instruct 
   the patient in prevention (avoid picking the nose, bending over, sneezing, 
   and straining) and treatment of recurrences (compress below the bridge of 
   the nose with thumb and finger for five minutes).
 * If the bleeding point cannot be located or if bleeding continues after 
   cauterization, insert an anterior pack. The best is a 1 cm by 10 cm stick 
   of compressed cellulose which expands to conform (Merocel, Rhino Rocket). 
   To prevent putrification of the pack, partly cover it with antibiotic 
   ointment before insertion. Leave some cellulose exposed to allow for water 
   absorption. Instill a few drops of saline if it does not expand 
   spontaneously.
 * An alternative anterior pack can be made from up to six feet of half-inch 
   ribbon gauze impregnated with petroleum jelly (Vaseline). Cover the gauze 
   with antibiotic ointment and insert it with bayonet forceps. Start with 3-4 
   plies layered accordian fashion on the floor of the nasal cavity, placing 
   it as far posteriorly as possible, and pressing it down firmly with each 
   subsequent layer. Continue inserting the gauze until the affected nasal 
   cavity is tightly filled (expect to use about 3 to 5 feet per nostril). If 
   unilateral anterior nasal packing does not provide enough pressure, packing 
   the opposite side of the nose anteriorly can sometimes increase the 
   pressure by preventing the septum from bowing over into the side of the 
   nose that is not packed.
 * Observe the patient for 15 minutes. If no further bleeding occurs in the 
   nares or the posterior oropharynx, discharge him on a broad spectrum 
   antibiotic (amoxicillin tid 250mg) for five days to help prevent a 
   secondary sinusitis. The packing should be removed in 2-4 days.
 * Tape a small folded gauze pad beneath the nose to catch any minor 
   drainage. The patient can replace this from time to time if necessary.
 * Instruct the patient against sneezing with his mouth closed, bending over, 
   straining, or nose picking. The patient's head should be kept elevated for 
   24-48 hours. Provide detailed printed instructions on home care.
 * If the hemorrhage is suspected to have been severe, obtain orthostatic 
   blood pressure and pulse recordings along with an hematocrit before making 
   a disposition for the patient.
 * If the hemorrhage does not stop after adequate packing anteriorly, then 
   one or two posterior packs or nasal balloons should be inserted, and the 
   patient should be admitted to the hospital under the care of an 
   otolaryngologist.

What not to do:
---------------
 * Do not waste time trying to locate a bleeding site while brisk bleeding 
   obscures your vision in spite of vigorous suctioning. Have the patient blow 
   out any clots and insert the medicated cotton pledgets.
 * Do not get routine clotting studies unless there is other evidence of an 
   underlying bleeding disorder.
 * Do not cauterize or use instruments within the nose before providing 
   adequate topical anesthesia (some initial blind suctioning may, however, be 
   required to clear the nose of clots before instilling anesthetics).
 * Do not discharge a patient as soon as the bleeding stops, but keep him in 
   the ED for 15-30 minutes more. Look behind the uvula. If it is dripping 
   blood, the bleeding has not been controlled adequately. Posterior epistaxis 
   typically stops and starts cyclically and may not be recognized until all 
   the above treatments have failed.

Discussion
----------
Nosebleeds are more common in winter, no doubt reflecting the low ambient 
humidity indoors and outdoors and the increased incidence of upper respiratory 
tract infections. Troublesome nosebleeds are more common in middle-aged and 
elderly patients. Causes are numerous: dry nasal mucosa, nose picking and 
vascular fragility are the most common, but others include foreign bodies, 
blood dyscrasias, nasal or sinus neoplasm or infection, septal deformity, 
atrophic rhinitis, hereditary hemorrhagic telaniectasis and angiofibroma. High 
blood pressure makes epistaxis difficult to control but is rarely the sole 
precipitating cause.

Drying and crusting of the bleeding site, along with nose picking, may result 
in recurrent nasal hemorrhage. It may be helpful to instruct the patient on 
gently inserting Vaseline onto his nasal septum once or twice a day to prevent 
future drying and bleeding. Other useful techniques include electrocautery 
down a metal suction catheter, ophthalmic electrocautery tips (see subungual 
hematoma), submucosal injection of lidocaine with epinephrine, and application 
of hemostatic collagen (Gelfoam). There are also several balloon devices to 
provide anterior and posterior tamponade, some with a channel to maintain a 
patent nares. Because of the nasopulmonary reflex, arterial oxygen pressure 
will drop about 15mmHg after the nose is packed, which can be troublesome in a 
patient with heart or lung disease, and usually requires hospitalization and 
supplemental oxygen.

References:
-----------
 * Viducich RA, Blanda MP, Gerson LW: Posterior epistaxis: clinical features 
   and acute complications. Ann Emerg Med 1995;25:592-596.

-----------------------------------------------------
from Buttaravoli & Stair: COMMON SIMPLE EMERGENCIES ©
Longwood Information LLC 4822 Quebec St NW Washington DC 20016-3229
1.202.237.0971 fax 1.202.244.8393 electra@clark.net
-----------------------------------------------------