GOPHERSPACE.DE - P H O X Y
gophering on sdf.org
!3.06 Serous Otitis Media

Presentation
------------
Following an upper respiratory infection or an airplane flight, an adult may 
complain of a feeling of fullness in the ears, inability to equalize middle 
ear pressure, decreased hearing, and clicking, popping, or crackling sounds, 
especially when the head is moved. There is little pain or tenderness. Through 
the otoscope, the tympanic membrane appears retracted, with a dull to normal 
light reflex, minimal if any injection, and poor motion on insufflation. You 
may see an air-fluid level or bubbles through the ear drum. Hearing will be 
decreased and the Rinne test will show decreased air conduction (i.e., a 
tuning fork will be heard no better through air than through bone).

What to do:
-----------
 * Tell the patient to lie supine with head tilted back and toward the 
   affected side and then instill vasoconstrictor nose drops like 
   phenylephrine 1% (Neo-Synephrine) or oxymetazoline 0.05% (Afrin), wait two 
   minutes for the nasal mucosa to shrink, reinstill nose drops, and wait an 
   additional 2 minutes for the medicine to seep down to the posterior 
   pharyngeal wall, around the opening of the eustachian tube. Have him repeat 
   this procedure with drops (not spray) every 4 hours during the day for no 
   more than 3 days.
 * After each treatment with nose drops, instruct the patient to insufflate 
   his middle ear via his eustachian tube by closing his mouth, pinching his 
   nose shut, and blowing until his ears "pop."
 * Unless contraindicated by hypertension or other medical conditions, add a 
   systemic vasoconstrictor (pseudoephedrine 60mg qid).
 * Instruct the patient to seek otolaryngologic followup if not better in a 
   week.

What not to do:
---------------
 * Do not allow the patient to become habituated to vasoconstrictor nose 
   drops. After a few days, they become ineffective, and then the nasal mucosa 
   develop a rebound swelling known as "rhinitis medicamentosa" when the 
   medicine is withdrawn.
 * Do not prescribe antihistamines (which dry out secretions) unless clearly 
   indicated by an allergy.

Discussion
----------
Acute serous otitis media is probably caused by obstruction of the eustachian 
tube, creating negative pressure in the middle ear, which then draws a fluid 
transudate out of the middle ear epithelium. The treatment above is directed 
solely at reestablishing the patency of the eustachian tube, but further 
treatment includes insufflation of the eustachian tube or myringotomy. Fluid 
in the middle ear is more common in children, because of frequent viral upper 
respiratory infections and an underdeveloped eustachian tube. Children are 
also more prone to bacterial superinfection of the fluid in the middle ear, 
and, when accompanied by fever and pain, merit treatment with analgesics and 
antibiotics (e.g., ibuprofen and amoxicillin) (see above). Repeated bouts of 
serous otitis in an adult, especially if unilateral, should raise the question 
of obstruction of the eustachian tube by tumor or lymphatic hypertrophy.

References:
-----------
 * Csortan E, Jones J, Haan M, et al: Efficacy of pseudoephedrine for the 
   prevention of barotrauma during air travel. Ann Emerg Med 1994; 
   23:1324-1327.

-----------------------------------------------------
from Buttaravoli & Stair: COMMON SIMPLE EMERGENCIES ©
Longwood Information LLC 4822 Quebec St NW Washington DC 20016-3229
1.202.237.0971 fax 1.202.244.8393 electra@clark.net
-----------------------------------------------------