GOPHERSPACE.DE - P H O X Y
gophering on sdf.org
!3.01 Cerumen Impaction (Ear Wax Blockage)

Presentation
------------
The patient may complain of "wax in the ear," a "stuffed up" or foreign body 
sensation, pain, itching, decreased hearing, tinnitus, or dizziness. On 
physical examination, the dark brown, thick, dry cerumen, perhaps packed down 
against the ear drum, where it does not occur normally, obscures further 
visualization of the ear canal.

What to do:
-----------
 * Explain what you are going to do to the patient. Cover him with a 
   waterproof drape, have him hold a basin or thick towel below his ear, and 
   tilt the ear slightly over it.
 * Fill a 20ml syringe with warm water at approximately 98.6F (37C) and fit 
   it with a soft tubing catheter. Aim along the anterior superior wall of the 
   external ear canal (visualize directly) and squirt with all your might.
 * Repeat until all of the cerumen is gone. Dry the canal.
 * If multiple attempts at irrigation prove to be unsuccessful, then gentle 
   use of a cerumen spoon (ear curette) may be necessary to pull out the 
   excess wax. Warning the patient about potential discomfort or minor 
   bleeding before using the ear curette will save lengthy explanations and 
   apologies later.
 * Reexamine the ear and test the patient's hearing.
 * Warn the patient that he has thick ear wax, that he may need this 
procedure done again someday, and that he should never use swabs in his ear.

What not to do:
---------------
 * Do not irrigate an ear with a suspected or known tympanic membrane 
   perforation, or myringotomy tubes.
 * Do not waste time attempting to soften wax with ceruminolytic detergents.
 * Do not irrigate with a cold (or hot) solution.
 * Do not blindly insert a rigid instrument down the canal.
 * Do not irrigate with a stiff over-needle catheter. It can cause a painful 
   abrasion and bleeding or even perforate the tympanic membrane.
 * Do not leave water pooled in the canal. That can cause an external otitis. 
   A final instillation of 2% acetic acid (Acetasol, Domboro Otic, 
   half-strength vinegar) will also prevent iatrogenic swimmer's ear.

Discussion
----------
This technique virtually always works within 5-10 squirts. If the irrigation 
fluid is at body temperature, it will soften the cerumen just enough that it 
floats out as a plug. If the fluid is too hot or cold it can produce vertigo, 
nystagmus, nausea, and vomiting.

A conventional blood-drawing syringe, fitted with a butterfly catheter, its 
tubing cut l cm from the hub, seems to work better than the big chrome-plated 
syringes manufactured for irrigating ears. An alternative technique is to use 
a WaterPik. Cerumen spoons can be dangerous and painful, especially with 
children, for whom this irrigation technique has proven more effective in 
cleaning the ear canal to provide for assessment of the tympanic membrane.

Cerumen is produced by the sebaceous glands of the hair follicles in the ear 
canal, and naturally flows outward along these hairs. One of the problems with 
ear swabs is that they can push wax inwards away from these hairs and against 
the ear drum, where it can then stick and harden. Patients may ask about "ear 
candles" to remove wax, but these are also not very effective compared to the 
technique above.

References
----------
 * Robinson AC, Hawke M: The efficacy of ceruminolytics: everything old is 
   new again. J Otolaryngol 1989;18:263-267.

-----------------------------------------------------
from Buttaravoli & Stair: COMMON SIMPLE EMERGENCIES ©
Longwood Information LLC 4822 Quebec St NW Washington DC 20016-3229
1.202.237.0971 fax 1.202.244.8393 electra@clark.net
-----------------------------------------------------