GOPHERSPACE.DE - P H O X Y
gophering on sdf.org
!1.12 Bell's Palsy (Idiopathic Facial Paralysis)

Presentation
------------
This condition creates a very frightening facial disfigurement. An adult 
complains of sudden onset of "numbness," a feeling of fullness or swelling, 
pain or some other change in sensation on one side of the face; a crooked 
smile, mouth "drawing" or some other asymmetrical weakness of facial muscles; 
an irritated, dry or tearing eye; drooling out of the corner of the mouth; or 
changes in hearing or taste. Often there will have been a viral illness one to 
three weeks before. Upon initial observation of the patient, it is immediately 
apparent that he is alert and oriented, with a unilateral facial paralysis 
that includes one side of the forehead.

What to do:
-----------
 * Perform a thorough neurological examination of cranial and upper cervical 
   nerves, and limb strength, noting which are involved, and whether 
   unilaterally or bilaterally. Ask the patient to wrinkle the forehead, close 
   the eyes forcefully, smile, puff the cheeks and whistle, observing closely 
   for facial assymetry. Central or cerebral lesions result in relative 
   sparing of the forehead. Check tearing, ability to close the eye and 
   protect the cornea, corneal dessication, hearing, and, when practical, 
   taste. Examine the ear canals for herpetic vesicles and the tympanic 
   membrane for signs of otitis media or cholesteatoma. Patients presenting 
   with facial paralysis accompanied by acute otitis media, chronic 
   suppurative middle ear disease, otorrhea or otitis externa require 
   otolaryngologic consultation.
 * If the cornea is dry or injured from the patient's inability to make tears 
   and blink, protect it by patching. If patching is not necessary, then 
   recommend wearing eyeglasses and applying methylcellulose artificial tears 
   regularly during the day and using a protective bland ointment at night.
 * If there is a history of head trauma, obtain a CT scan of the head 
   (including the skull base) to rule out a temporal bone fracture.
 * If the diagnosis is clearly an early idiopathic cranial nerve palsy not 
   caused or complicated by trauma, infection, or diabetes, try to ameliorate 
   symptons with a short course of corticosteroids (e.g., prednisone 60mg qd, 
   tapering after 5 days.)
 * Send a serum specimen for acute phase Lyme disease titers, if available, 
   because this is another treatable disorder which can present as a facial 
   neuropathy. In areas where Lyme disease is endemic, a 10 day course of 
   tetracycline or doxycycline may be indicated.
 * If the etiology appears to be zoster-varicella (e.g., grouped vesicles on 
   the tongue) prescribe acyclovir or famcyclovir as for shingles.
 * Reassure the patient that 70-80% of cases of Bell's palsy recover 
   completely in a few weeks, but provide for definite followup and 
   reevaluation.
 * Provide appropriate specialty referral when there is a mass in the head or 
   neck or a history of any malignancy.

What not to do:
---------------
 * Do not forget alternate causes of facial palsy which require different 
   treatment, such as cerebrovascular accidents and cerebellopontine angle 
   tumors (which usually produce weakness in limbs or defects of adjacent 
   cranial nerves), multiple sclerosis (which is usually not painful, spares 
   taste, and often produces intranuclear ophthalmoplegia), Ramsay Hunt 
   syndrome (or herpes zoster of the geniculate ganglion, which causes 
   decreased hearing, pain, and vesicles in the ear canal), and polio (which 
   presents as fever, headache, neck stiffness, and palsies).
 * Do not order a CT unless there is a history of trauma or the symptoms are 
   atypical and include such findings as vertigo. central neurological signs, 
   or severe headache.
 * Do not make the diagnosis of Bell's palsy in patients who report gradual 
   onset of facial paralysis over several weeks or facial paralysis that has 
   persisted 3 months or more. These patients need further evaluation by a 
   neurologist or otolaryngologist.

Discussion
----------
Idiopathic nerve paralysis is a common malady. It affects 20 per 100,000 
people a year. Although Bell's palsy was described classically as a pure 
facial nerve lesion, and physicians have tried to identify the exact level at 
which the nerve is compressed, the most common presenting complaints are 
related to trigeminal nerve involvement. The mechanism is probably a spotty 
demyelination of several nerves at several sites, caused by a viral infection. 
Diabetics and pregnant women have increased incidence of Bell's palsy.

References:
-----------
 * Austin JR, Peskind SP, Austin SG, et al: Idiopathic facial nerve paralysis: 
   a randomized double blind controlled study of placebo versus prednisone. 
   Laryngoscope 1993;103:1326-1333.
 * Stankiewicz JA: A review of the published data on steroids and idiopathic 
   facial paralysis. Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg 1987;97:481-486.

-----------------------------------------------------
from Buttaravoli & Stair: COMMON SIMPLE EMERGENCIES ©
Longwood Information LLC 4822 Quebec St NW Washington DC 20016-3229
1.202.237.0971 fax 1.202.244.8393 electra@clark.net
-----------------------------------------------------