GOPHERSPACE.DE - P H O X Y
gophering on sdf.org
!1.11 Vertigo ("Dizzy, lightheaded")

Presentation
------------
This may be a nonspecific complaint which must be refined further into either 
an altered somatic sensation (giddiness, wooziness); orthostatic blood 
pressure changes (lightheadedness, sensation of fainting); or the sensation of 
the environment (or patient) spinning (true vertigo). In inner ear disease, 
vertigo is virtually always accompanied by nystagmus, which is the ocular 
compensation for the unreal sensation of spinning; but the nystagmus may be 
extinguished when the eyes are open and fixed on some point (by the same 
token, vertigo is usually worse with the eyes closed). Nausea and vomiting are 
common accompanying symptoms, but less common (depending on the underlying 
cause) are hearing changes, tinnitus, cerebellar or adjacent cranial nerve 
impairment.

What to do:
-----------
 * Have the patient tell you in his own words what it feels like (without 
   using the word "dizzy"). Ask about any sensation of spinning, factors which 
   make it better or worse, and associated symptoms. Ask about drugs or toxins 
   which could be responsible.
 * Determine whether the patient is describing vertigo (a feeling of movement 
   of one's body or surroundings) or a sensation of an impending faint or a 
   vague unsteady feeling.
 * If the problem is near syncope or orthostatic lightneadedness, then 
   consider potentially serious etiologies such as heart disease, cardiac dys- 
   rhythmias or blood loss.
 * With a sensation of dysequilibrium or an elderly patient's feeling that he 
   is going to fall, look for peripheral neuropathy, cervical spondylosis, 
   stiff legs and vasodilator medication. These patients should be referred to 
   their primary care physicians for management of their underlying medical 
   problems and adjustment of their medications.
 * If there is light-headedness that is unrelated to changes in position and 
   posture and there is no evidence of disease found on physical examination 
   and laboratory evaluation, then instruct the patient to hyperventilate by 
   breathing deeply in and out fifteen times. If this reproduces the symptoms, 
   assess the patient's emotional state as a possible cause of his symptoms.
 * If the patient is having true vertigo, examine for nystagmus, which can be 
   horizontal, vertical or rotatory (pupils describe arcs). Have the patient 
   follow your finger with his eyes as it moves a few degrees to the left and 
   right (not to extremes of gaze) and watch whether there are more than the 
   normal 2 to 3 beats of nystagmus before the eyes are still. You may detect 
   nystagmus when the eyes are closed by watching the bulge of the cornea 
   moving under the lid.
 * If nystagmus is not clearly evident and the patient can tolerate it, 
   attempt a provocative maneuver for positional nystagmus by having the 
   patient sit up and then lie back, quickly hang his head over the stretcher 
   side and turn his head and eyes to one side. Repeat to the other side. When 
   this maneuver produces positional nystagmus, it indicates a benign inner 
   ear dysfunction. A negative test is not helpful.
 * Examine ears for cerumen, foreign bodies, otitis media, and hearing loss.
 * Examine the cranial nerves. Test cerebellar function (rapid alternating 
   movement, finger-nose, gait). Check the corneal blink reflexes: if absent 
   on one side in a patient who does not wear contact lenses, consider 
   acoustic neuroma.
 * Decide, on the basis of the above, whether the etiology is central 
   (brainstem, cerebellopontine angle tumor, multiple sclerosis) or peripheral 
   (vestibular organs, eighth nerve). Central lesions may require further 
   workup, otolaryngologic or neurologic consultation, or hospital admission, 
   while peripheral lesions, although more symptomatic, are more likely self- 
   limiting.
 * In the emergency department, treat moderate to severe symptoms of vertigo 
   with intravenous diazepam (Valium) 10 mg or diphenhydramine (Benadryl) 
   50mg. Add promethazine (Phenergan) 25mg iv for nausea. If there are no 
   contraindications (e.g. glaucoma) then a patch of transdermal scopolamine 
   can be worn for three days. Some authors recommend hydroxyzine (Vistaril, 
   Atarax) while others suggest corticosteroids (Solu-Medrol, Prednisone). 
   Nifedipine (Procardia) had been used to alleviate notion sickness but is no 
   better than scopolamine patches, and should not be used for patients with 
   postural hypotension or who take beta blockers. If the patient does not 
   respond, he may require hospitalization for further parenteral treatment.
 * Treat vertigo symptoms in outpatients with diazepam (Valium) 5-10mg qid, 
   meclizine (Antivert) 12.5-25mg qid, diphenhydramine (Dramamine, Benadryl) 
   25-50mg qid, promethazine (Phenergan) 25mg qid,or hydroxyzine (Vistaril) 
   25mg qid, and bedrest as needed until symptoms improve.
 * Arrange for followup if there is no clear improvement in 2 days or if 
   there is any suggestion of a central etiology.

What not to do:
---------------
 * Do not attempt provocative maneuvers if the patient is symptomatic with 
   nystagmus.
 * Do not give anti-vertigo drugs to elderly patients with dysequilibrium. 
   These medications have sedative properties which can make them worse.
 * Do not make the diagnosis of Meniere's disease (endolymphatic hydrops) 
   without the triad of paroxysmal vertigo, sensorineural deafness, and 
   tinnitus, along with a feeling of pressure or fullness in the affected ear.

Discussion
----------
In general, the more violent and spinning the sensation of vertigo, the more 
likely the lesion if peripheral. Central lesions tend to cause less intense 
vertigo and more vague symptoms. Peripheral etiologies of vertigo or nystagmus 
include irritation of the ear (utricle, saccule, semi- circular canals) or the 
vestibular division of the eighth cranial (acoustic) nerve by toxins otitis, 
viral infection, or cerumen or a foreign body against the tympanic membrane. 
The term "labyrinthitis" should be reserved for vertigo with hearing changes, 
and "vestibular neuronitis" for the common short-lived vertigo without hearing 
changes usually associated with viral upper respiratory infections. Paroxysmal 
positional vertigo may be related to dislocated otoconia in the utricle and 
saccule. If it occurs following trauma, suspect a basal skull fracture with 
leakage of endolymph or perilymph, and consider otolaryngologic referral for 
further evaluation and positional Central etiologies include multiple 
sclerosis, temporal lobe epilepsy, basilar migraine and hemorrhage in the 
posterior fossa. A slow-growing acoustic neuroma in the cerebellopontine angle 
usually does not present with acute vertigo but rather a progressive 
unilateral hearing loss with or without tinnitus. The earliest sign is usually 
a gradual loss of auditory discrimination.

Vertebrobasilar arterial insufficiency can cause vertigo, usually with 
associated nausea, vomiting and cranial nerve or cerebellar signs. It is 
commonly diagnosed in dizzy pateints who are older than 50, but more often 
than not the diagnosis is incorrect. The brainstem is a tightly-packed 
structure in which the vestibular nuclei are crowded in with the oculomotor 
nuclei, the medial longitudinal fasiculus, cerebellar, sensory and motor 
pathways. It would be unusual for ischmia to produce only vertigo without 
accompanying diplopia, ataxia, sensory or motor disturbance. Although vertigo 
may be the major symptom of an ischemic attack, careful questioning of the 
patient commonly uncovers symptoms implicating involvement of other brainstem 
structures. Objective neurologic signs should be present in frank infarction 
of the brainstem.

Either central or peripheral nystagmus can be due to toxins, most commonly 
alcohol, tobacco, aminoglycosides, minocycline, disopyramide, phencyclidine, 
phenytoin, benzodiazepines, quinine, quinidine, aspirin, salicylates, non- 
steroidal anti-inflammatories and carbon monoxide. Nystagmus occuring in 
central nervous system disease may be vertical and disconjugate, whereas inner 
ear nystagmus never is. Central nystagmus is gaze-directed (beats in the 
direction of gaze) whereas inner ear nystagmus is direction-fixed (beats in 
one direction regardless of the direction of gaze). Central nystagmus is 
brought out by visual fixation, which supressed inner ear nystagmus.

References:
-----------
 * Herr RD, Zun L, Matthews JJ: A directed approach to the dizzy patient. Ann 
   Emerg Med 1989;18:664-672.
 * Froehling DA, Silverstein MD, Mohr DN et al: Does this patient have a 
   serious form of vertigo? J Am Med Assoc 1994;271;385-388.
 * Epley JM: Positional vertigo related to semicircular canalithiasis. 
   Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg 1995;112:154-161.

-----------------------------------------------------
from Buttaravoli & Stair: COMMON SIMPLE EMERGENCIES ©
Longwood Information LLC 4822 Quebec St NW Washington DC 20016-3229
1.202.237.0971 fax 1.202.244.8393 electra@clark.net
-----------------------------------------------------