GOPHERSPACE.DE - P H O X Y
gophering on sdf.org
!1.09 Polymyalgia Rheumatica

Presentation
------------
An elderly patient (more commonly female) complains of a week or two of 
morning stiffness, which may interfere with her ability to rise from bed, but 
improves during the day. She may ascribe her problem to muscle weakness or 
joint pains, but physical examination discloses that symmetrical pain and 
tenderness of neck, shoulder, and hip muscles are the actual source of any 
"weakness." There may be some mild arthritis of several peripheral joints, but 
the rest of the physical examination is negative.

What to do:
-----------
 * Perform a complete history and physical examination, particularly of the 
   cervical and lumbar spines and nerve roots (strength, sensation, and deep 
   tendon reflexes in the distal limbs should be intact with PMR). Confirm the 
   diagnosis of PMR by palpating tender shoulder muscles (perhaps also hips, 
   and, less commonly, neck).
 * Confirm the diagnosis by obtaining an erythrocyte sedimentation rate, 
   which should be in the 30-l00mm/hour range. (An especially high ESR, over 
   100/hour suggests more severe autoimmune disease or malignancy.)
 * Mild and borderline cases may respond with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory 
   medications (ibuprofen, naproxen). More severe cases will respond to 
   prednisone 20-60mg qd within a week or two, after which the dose should be 
   tapered. Failure to respond to corticosteroid therapy suggests some other 
   diagnosis.
 * Explain the syndrome to the patient and arrange for followup.

What not to do:
---------------
 * Do not miss temporal arteritis, a common component of the polymyalgia 
   rheumatica syndrome, and a clue to the existence of ophthalmic and cerebral 
   arteritis, which can have dire neurological consequences. Palpate the 
   temporal arteries for tenderness, swelling, or induration, and ask about 
   transient neurological signs.
 * Do not postpone diagnosis or treatment of temporal arteritis pending 
   results of a temporal artery biopsy showing giant cell arteritis. The 
   lesion typically skips areas, making biopsy an insensitive diagnostic 
   procedure.

Discussion
----------
Stiffness, pain, and weakness are common complaints in older patients, but 
polymyalgia rheumatica may respond dramatically to treatment. Rheumatoid 
arthritis produces morning stiffness, but is usually present in more 
peripheral joints, and without muscle tenderness. Polymyositis is usually 
characterized by increased serum muscle enzymes with a normal ESR, and may 
include a skin rash (dermatomyositis). Often, a therapeutic trial of 
prednisone helps make the diagnosis.

-----------------------------------------------------
from Buttaravoli & Stair: COMMON SIMPLE EMERGENCIES ©
Longwood Information LLC 4822 Quebec St NW Washington DC 20016-3229
1.202.237.0971 fax 1.202.244.8393 electra@clark.net
-----------------------------------------------------