GOPHERSPACE.DE - P H O X Y
gophering on sdf.org
!1.07 Tension Headache

Presentation
------------
The patient complains of a dull, steady pain, described as an ache, pressure, 
throb, or constricting band, located anywhere from eyes to occiput, perhaps 
including the neck or shoulders. Most commonly, the headache develops near the 
end of the day, or after some particular stress. The pain may improve with 
rest, aspirin, acetaminophen, or other medications. The physical exam will be 
unremarkable except for cranial or posterior muscle spasm or tenderness.

What to do:
-----------
 * Perform a complete general history (including environmental factors and 
   foods which precede the headaches) and physical examination (including a 
   neurological examination).
 * If the patient complains of sudden onset of the "worst headache of my 
   life," accompanied by any change in mental status, weakness, vomiting, 
   seizures, stiff neck, or persistent neurologic abnormalities, suspect a 
   cerebrovascular cause, especially a subarachnoid hemorrhage, intracranial 
   hemorrhage, or arteriovenous malformation. The best initial diagnostic test 
   for these is computed tomography, but when CT is not available and the 
   patient does not have papilledema or other signs of increased intracranial 
   pressure, rule out these problems with a lumbar puncture.
 * If the headache is accompanied by fever and stiff neck, or change in mental 
   status, you need to rule out bacterial meningitis as soon as possible, 
   again with lumbar puncture.
 * If the headache was preceded by ophthalmic or neurologic symptoms, now 
   resolving, suggestive of a migraine headache, you may want to try 
   sumatriptan or ergotamine therapy. If vasospastic symptoms persist into the 
   headache phase, the etiology may still be a migraine, but it becomes more 
   important to rule out other cerebrovascular causes.
 * If the headache follows prolonged reading, driving, or television watching, 
   and decreased visual acuity is improved by viewing through a pinhole, the 
   headache may be due to a defect in optical refraction, curable with new 
   eyeglass lenses.
 * If the temples are tender, check for visual defects and myalgias that 
   accompany temporal arteritis.
 * If there is a history of recent dental work or grinding of teeth, 
   tenderness anterior to the tragus, or crepitus on motion of the jaw, 
   suspect arthritis of the temperomandibular joint.
 * If there is fever, tenderness to percussion over the frontal or maxillary 
   sinuses, purulent drainage visible in the nose, or facial pain exacerbated 
   by lowering the head, consider sinusitis.
 * If pain radiates to the ear, be sure to inspect and palpate the teeth, 
   which are a common site of referred pain.
 * Finally, after checking for all these other causes of headache, palpate 
   the temporalis, occipitalis, and other muscles of the calvarium and neck, 
   looking for areas of tenderness and spasm which usually accompany muscle 
   tension headaches. Keep an eye out for especially tender trigger points 
   which may resolve with gentle pressure or massage.
 * Prescribe anti-inflammatory analgesics (ibuprofen, naproxen), recommend 
   rest, and have the patient try cool compresses and massage of any trigger 
   points.
 * Explain the etiology and treatment of muscle spasm of the head and neck. 
   Volunteer the information that you see no evidence of other serious 
   disease (if this is true); especially that a brain tumor is unlikely. 
   (Often this is a fear which is never voiced.)
 * Arrange for followup. Instruct the patient to return to the ED or contact 
   his own physician if symptoms change or worsen.

What not to do:
---------------
 * Do not discharge without followup instructions. Many serious illnesses 
   begin with a minor cephalgia, and patients may postpone urgent; care in the 
   belief that they have been definitively diagnosed on the first visit.
 * Do not miss subarachnoid hemorrhage and meningitis. (If you are not 
   obtaining a majority of negative CTs and LPs, you may not be looking hard 
   enough.)

Discussion
----------
Headaches are common and most are benign, but any headache brought to medical 
attention deserves a thorough evaluation. Screening tests are of little 
value--a laborious history and physical examination are required. Other causes 
of headache include carbon monoxide exposure from wood heaters, fevers and 
viral myalgias, caffeine withdrawal, hypertension, glaucoma, tic douloureux 
(trigeminal neuralgia) and intolerance of foods containing nitrite, tyramine, 
xanthine. Tension headache is not a wastebasket diagnosis of exclusion but a 
specific diagnosis, confirmed by palpating tenderness in craniocervical 
muscles. ("Tension" refers to muscle spasm more than life stress.) Tension 
headache is often dignified with the diagnosis of " migraine" without any 
evidence of a vascular etiology, and is often treated with minor 
tranquilizers, which may or may not help. Focal tenderness over the greater 
occipital nerves (C2, 3) can be associated with an occipital neuralgia or 
occipital headache, and be secondary to cervical radiculopathy from cervical 
spondylosis. These tend to occur in older patients and should not be confused 
with tension headache. Remember to probe for the patient's hidden agenda. 
"Headache" may often be the justification for seeing a physician when some 
other physical, emotional, or social concern is actually the patient's major 
problem.

-----------------------------------------------------
from Buttaravoli & Stair: COMMON SIMPLE EMERGENCIES ©
Longwood Information LLC 4822 Quebec St NW Washington DC 20016-3229
1.202.237.0971 fax 1.202.244.8393 electra@clark.net
-----------------------------------------------------