GOPHERSPACE.DE - P H O X Y
gophering on sdf.org
!1.04 Seizures (Convulsions, fits)

Presentation
------------
The patient may be found in the street, the hospital, or the emergency room. 
The patient may complain of an "aura," feel he is "about to have a seizure," 
experience a brief petit mal "absence," exhibit the repetitive stereotypical 
behavior of continuous partial seizures, the whole-body tonic stiffness or 
clonic jerking of grand mal seizures, or simply be found in the gradual 
recovery of the postictal phase. Patients experiencing grand mal seizures can 
injure themselves, and generalized seizures prolonged for more than a couple 
of minutes can lead to hypoxia, acidosis, and even brain damage.

What to do:
-----------
 * If the patient is having a grand mal seizure, stand by him for a few 
   minutes until his thrashing subsides, to guard against injury or airway 
   obstruction. Usually only suctioning or turning the patient on his side is 
   required, but breathing will be uncoordinated until the tonic-clonic phase 
   is over.
 * Watch the pattern of the seizure for clues to the etiology. (Did clonus 
   start in one place and "march" out to the rest of the body? Did the eyes 
   deviate one way throughout the seizure? Did the whole body participate?)
 * If the seizure lasts more than two minutes, or recurs before the patient 
   regains consciousness, it has overwhelmed the brain's natural buffers and 
   may require drugs to stop. This is defined as status epilepticus, and is best 
   treated with diazepam (Valium) 5-l0mg iv, followed by gradual loading with 
   iv phenytoin.
 * Check a quick finger stick blood sugar (especially if the patient is 
   wearing a "diabetes" MedicAlert bracelet or medallion) and administer 
   intravenous glucose if it is below normal.
 * If the patient arrives postictal, examine him thoroughly for injuries and 
   record a complete neurological examination (the results of which are apt to 
   be bizarre). Repeat the neurological exam periodically. If the patient is indeed 
   recovering, you may be able to obviate much of the diagnostic workup by 
   waiting until he is lucid enough to give a history.
 * If the patient arrives awake and oriented following an alleged seizure, 
   corroborate the history through witnesses or the presence of injuries like 
   a scalp laceration or a bitten tongue. Doubt a grand mal seizure without a 
   prolonged postictal recovery period.
 * If the patient has a previous history of seizure disorder, or is taking 
   anticonvulsant medications, check old records, speak to his physician, find 
   out whether he has been worked up for an etiology, look for reasons for 
   this relapse (e.g., infection, ethanol, lack of sleep), and draw blood for levels 
   of anticonvulsants.
 * If the seizure is clearly related to alcohol withdrawal, ascertain why the 
   patient reduced his consumption. He might be broke, be suffering from 
   pancreatitis or gastritis that requires further evaluation and treatment, 
   or have decided to dry out completely. If the last, and is demonstrating signs of 
   delerium tremens, such as tremors, tachycardia and hallucinations, his 
   withdrawal should be medically supervised, and covered with benzodiazepines 
   (e.g. Librium, Valium, Ativan). Many emergency physicians presumptively 
   treat alcohol withdrawal symptoms with an intravenous infusion containing 
   glucose, l00mg thiamine, 2Gm magnesium and multivitamins.
 * If the seizure is a new event, make arrangements for a workup, including an 
   EEG. About half of patients with a new onset of seizures will require 
   hospitalization, and most of these patients can be identified by 
   abnormalities on physical examination, head CT or blood counts. Other tests 
   (lumbar puncture, serum electrolytes, glucose, calcium) may also identify 
   new seizure victims who require admission.
 * If the workup will be as an outpatient, the patient should be loaded with 
   phenytoin (Dilantin) 17-20mg/kg over 1/2 hour iv, or over 6 hours po to 
   protect him from further seizures. If there is any question, check a serum 
   phenytoin level before giving this loading dose. Patients should be on a 
   cardiac monitor during iv loading, which should be slowed if they develop 
   conduction blocks or dysrythmias.

What not to do:
---------------
 * Do not stick anything in the mouth of a seizing patient. The ubiquitous 
   padded throat sticks may be nice for a patient to hold and bite on at the 
   first sign of a seizure, but do nothing to protect his airway, and are 
   ineffective when the jaw is clenched.
 * Do not rush to give intravenous diazepam to a seizing patient. Most 
   seizures stop in a few minutes. It is diagnostically useful to see how the 
   seizure resolves on its own; also, the patient will awaken sooner if he has 
   not been medicated. Reserve diazepam for genuine status epilepticus.
 * Be careful not to assume an alcoholic etiology. Ethanol abusers sustain 
   more head trauma and seizure disorders than the population at large.
 * Do not treat alcohol withdrawal seizures with phenobarbital or phenytoin. 
   Both lack efficacy (and necessity, since the problem is self-limiting) and 
   can themselves produce withdrawal seizures.
 * Do not rule out alcohol withdrawal seizures on the basis of a toxic serum 
   ethanol level. The patient may actually be withdrawing from a yet higher 
   baseline.
 * Do not be fooled by pseudoseizures. Even patients with genuine epilepsy 
   occasionally fake seizures for various reasons, and an exceptional 
   performer can be convincing. Amateurs may be roused with ammonia or 
   smelling salts, but few can simulate the fluctuating neurological 
   abnormalities of the postictal state, and probably no one can produce the 
   pronounced metabolic acidosis or serum lactate elevation of a grand mal 
   seizure.
 * Do not release a patient with persistent neurologic abnormalities without a 
   head CT or specialty consultation.
 * Do not let a seizure victim drive home.

Discussion
----------
Grand mal seizures are frightening, and inspire observers to "do something," 
but usually all that is necessary is to stand by and prevent the patient from 
injuring himself. The age of the patient makes some difference as to the 
probable underlying etiology of a first seizure and therefore makes some 
difference in disposition. Under age 3, rapid rise of temperature can cause a 
generalized febrile seizure which does not lead to epilepsy, and is best 
treated by control of fever. Brief febrile seizures may not require a lumbar 
puncture to evaluate the cause of the fever, but these children should be 
managed in consultation with the primary care physician to ensure early follow 
up. In the 12 to 20-year-old patient, the seizure is probably "idio- pathic," 
although other causes are certainly possible. In the 40-year-old patient with 
a first seizure, one needs to exclude neoplasm, post-traumatic epilepsy, or 
withdrawal. In the 65-year-old patient with a first seizure, cerebrovascular 
insufficiency must also be considered. Such a patient should be treated and 
worked up with the possibility of an impending stroke, in addition to the 
other possible causes. For these reasons, a patient with a first seizure who 
is 30 years old or older needs to have a CT scan, preferably while in the ED. 
A noncontrast study can be obtained initially. If there are abnormalities 
present or if there are still suspicions of a focal abnormality, a contrast 
study can be obtained at the same time or later, whichever is convenient. 
Also, patients should be discharged for outpatient care, only if there is full 
recovery of neurological function, with a full loading dose of phenytoin, and 
with clear arrangements for follow-up or return to the ED if another seizure 
occurs. An EEG can usually be done electively, except in status epilepticus. A 
toxic screen may be needed to detect the many overdoses that can present as 
seizures, including amphetamines, cocaine, isoniazide, lidocaine, lithium, 
phencyclidine, phenytoin and tricyclic antidepressants.

References:
-----------
 * Eisner RF, Turnbull TL, Howes DS et al: Efficacy of a "standard" seizure 
   workup in the emergency department. Ann Emerg Med 1986;15:33-39.
 * Henneman PL, DeRoos F, Lewis RJ: Determining the need for admission in 
   patients with new-onset seizures. Ann Emerg Med 1994;24:1108-1114.

-----------------------------------------------------
from Buttaravoli & Stair: COMMON SIMPLE EMERGENCIES ©
Longwood Information LLC 4822 Quebec St NW Washington DC 20016-3229
1.202.237.0971 fax 1.202.244.8393 electra@clark.net
-----------------------------------------------------