GOPHERSPACE.DE - P H O X Y
gophering on sdf.org
!1.03 Minor Head Trauma ("Concussion")

Presentation 
------------ 
A patient is brought to the ED after suffering a blow to the head. There may 
or may not be a laceration, scalp hematoma, headache, transient sleepiness 
and/or nausea, but there was NO loss of consciousness, amnesia for the injury 
or preceding events, seizure, neurological changes, or disorientation. The 
patient or family may express concern about a "mild concussion," the 
possibility of a skull fracture, or a rapidly developing scalp hematoma or 
"goose egg."

What to do:
-----------
 * Corroborate and record the history from witnesses. Ascertain why the 
   patient was injured (was there a seizure or sudden weakness?) and rule out 
   particularly dangerous types of head trauma. (A blow by a brick or hammer 
   is more likely to produce a depressed skull fracture.)
 * Perform and record a physical examination of the head, looking for signs of 
   a skull fracture, such as hemotympanum or bony depression, and examine the 
   neck for spasm, bony tenderness, rage of motion, and other signs of 
   associated injury.
 * Perform and record a neurological examination, with special attention to 
   mental status, cranial nerves, strength, and deep tendon reflexes to all 
   four limbs.
 * If the history or physical examination suggests there could be a clinically 
   significant intracranial injury, obtain a non-contrast computed tomogram 
   (CT) scan of the head. Criteria for obtaining a CT scan include: documented loss of 
   consciousness, amnesia, cerebrospinal fluid leaking from nose or ear, blood 
   behind the tympanic membrane or over the mastoid (Battle's sign), stupor, 
   coma, or any focal neurological sign.
 * If the history or physical examination suggests there could be a clinically 
   significant skull fracture, obtain skull x rays. Criteria for obtaining 
   skull x rays include: a blow by a heavy object, suspected skull penetration and 
   palpable depression.
 * If there is no clinical indication for CT scan or skull films, explain to 
   the patient and concerned family and friends why x-ray images are not being 
   ordered. Many patients expect x rays, but will gladly forego them once you 
   explain they are of little value.
 * Explain to the patient and responsible family or friends that the more 
   important possible sequelae of head trauma are not diagnosed with x rays, 
   but by noting certain signs and symptoms as they occur later. Make sure that they 
   understand and are given written instructions that any abnormal behavior, 
   increasing drowsiness or difficulty in rousing the patient, headache, neck 
   stiffness, vomiting, visual problems, weakness, or seizures are signals to 
   return to the ED immediately.

What not to do:
---------------
 * Do not skimp on the neurological examination or its documentation.
 * Do not be reassured by negative skull films, which do not rule out 
   intracranial bleeding or edema.

Discussion 
---------- 
The risks of late neurological sequelae (subdural hematoma, seizure disorder, 
meningitis, post concussion syndrome, etc.) make good followup essential after 
any head trauma; but the vast majority of patients without findings on initial 
examination do well. It is probably unwise to describe to the patient all of 
the subtle possible long-term effects of head trauma, because many may be 
induced by suggestion. Concentrate on making sure all understand the danger 
signs to watch for over the next few days. A large scalp hematoma may have a 
soft central area which mimics a depression in the skull when palpated 
directly, but allows palpation of the underlying skull when pushed to one 
side. Cold packs may be recommended to reduce the swelling, and the patient 
may be reassured that the hematoma will resolve over days to weeks. Patients 
with minor head injuries who meet the criteria for a CT scan but who have a 
normal scan and neurological examination may be safely discharged from the ED.

References:
-----------
 * Shackford SR, Wald SL, Ross SE, et al: The clinical utility of computed 
   tomographic scanning and neurologic examination in the management of 
   patients with minor head injuries. J Trauma 1992;33:385-394.
 * Mitchell KA, Fallat ME, Raque GH, et al: Evaluation of minor head injury 
   in children. J Ped Surg 1994;29:851-854.
 * Staffeld L, Levitt A, Simon, et al: Identification of ethanol-intoxicated 
   patients with minor head trauma requiring computed tomography scans. Acad 
   Emerg Med 1993:1:227-234.

------------------------------------------------
Buttaravoli & Stair: COMMON SIMPLE EMERGENCIES ©
Longwood Information LLC 4822 Quebec St NW Washington DC 20016-3229
1.202.237.0971 fax 1.202.244.8393 electra@clark.net
------------------------------------------------