GOPHERSPACE.DE - P H O X Y
gophering on sdf.org
Term: Fall 2010 Academic Session: Aug-Dec 2010

Class meeting times:  Online course; online meetings will be posted on the course site. 
Location: online
Instructor: William J. (Joe) Welch 
Phone: (831) 275-0853 (e-mail contact is preferred)

E-mail: jwelch@hartnell.edu   Feel free to contact me at any time. Please include the following information in the subject of a
ny e-mail that you send to me: "Hartnell CSS-41 [Your name]".  Your e-mails reflect your interest and capabilities - compose yo
ur e-mails using correct grammar and syntax. E-mails with poor grammar or spelling, or missing "CSS-41" in the subject line wil
l not receive a response.

Course Description: This course blends operating systems theory and practice in a well-organized way. Its two-part approach exp
lores operating systems theory and development in the first section, and discusses two widely-used operating systems ( Windows,
 and Linux/UNIX) in the second. Students will appreciate the many examples and illustrations found within the course. Lab work 
in addition to regularly scheduled hours will be necessary.

CSS-41is a challenging and rewarding class.  Personal dedication and significant effort will be required by each student to be 
successful. Extensive work will be required outside of class hours - please plan to work hard and learn a great deal - appropri
ately arrange your hours and schedule.

Course Topics: 
Memory Management, Early Systems
Memory Management, Evolution of Virtual Memory
Processor Management 
Process Management
Concurrent Processes 
Device Management 
File Management
Network Organization Concepts 
Management of Network Functions
System Security
System Management
Windows Operating Systems
UNIX Operating System

Required Materials: 
1.Textbooks:
a.Understanding Operating Systems (McHoes, Flynn), 6th ed. ISBN 1-4390-7920-X
b.Your Unix (Das), 2nd ed. ISBN 0-07-252042-6
2.USB Headset/Microphone. Must be USB due to sound quality and improved noise cancellation. Following headset is recommended: L
ogitech ClearChat Comfort USB Headset.
3.As this is an online class, access to a computer is essential. Also, you must be able to install the Putty secure Telnet clie
nt on your PC. (Small client application, used to access the Unix server used in class.)

Course Web Site: (http://xlnlearning.moodlehub.com/) You will be enrolled in this web site prior to the first evening of the cl
ass. Access to this URL will be reviewed during the first lab. All documents will be posted on the class web site. If a documen
t is misplaced, please refer to this site for a new copy. Also, quizzes and surveys may be placed on this site.  Updates to the
 class and tips for programming will be placed on this web page. Check this site each night.
Username: first initial + last name (ex. Juanita Martinez = jmartinez, all lower case)
Password: first login begins as "student" and must be changed after the first log in
Quizzes and Exams: These challenges are designed to evaluate your understanding of the fundamental principles discussed in the 
textbook and during the class presentation. They are to reinforce and focus the student's effort. The quiz and problems will be
 very similar to the homework assignments. Ultimately, as with all we do, these quizzes and tests serve to assist learning the 
topics of the course. 

Lab and Operating System Assignments: 
(1) All projects are to be individual projects, and must represent the student's own work. 
(2) It is very important to stay up to date regarding class reading and class projects. Lab assignments are due on the date ind
icated (please check the course web site if you have any questions regarding the specific due date). Note: We encourage persona
l excellence and accountability: The assignments are due beforethe date/times provided.  There is no credit awarded for assignm
ents turned in late, or for programs that do not compile. Please let me know as soon as possible if you have any questions or c
oncerns. Start programming early.

Course Outline: 
We will follow the sequence of topics in the course outline very closely. At the end of class each evening I will summarize the
 concepts covered in that particular class and provide the reading to be done prior to the next class session. Please complete 
the prescribed reading before the class session. 

Grading:  The course grade is computed as follows: 

Points Available for Each Type of Assignment:
Quizzes:  20 points for each quiz (approx)
Exams:  200 points               (2 exams)
Written assignments/labs: 10   points for each programming lab
Extra credit assignments: 45points  (three assignments of 15 points each). Two weeks are allowed for each EC assignment.

Numeric Score
Letter Grade
90 - 100
A
80 - 89
B
70 - 79
C
60 - 69
D
0 - 59 
F

Participation: Regular participation in this course is vital. Regular participation is accomplished via turning in assignments,
 participating in class, asking questions and doing well on quizzes and exams. Each section builds on prior lessons and concept
s....so, ask questions if a topic is fuzzy or unclear. 

Schedule: Progress in the course each week will be posted on the course web site. Each week will be comprised of:
1.Readings
2.Web hosted presentations (screen casts)
3.Online quizzes
4.Online conferences and writing assignments.
5.Lab assignments

Expectations for Students:
1.As this is an online course, the expectation for study discipline and dedication for students is significantly higher than a 
resident, face-face class.
2.All assignments will be turned in prior to due date. As there is no credit for a late assignment, the assignments for the wee
k will be started early, with sufficient time to ask questions and receive a reply. Due dates for each assignment are available
 on the course web site.
3.Course interaction and engagement will be achieved through a variety of techniques, such as programs, quizzes, discussions, s
hort postings, surveys and papers. Students will respond to these assignments in a timely manner, with prose crafted in standar
d business English.
4.Postings, e-mail and discussions in the class will follow the listed "Net Etiquette" guidelines:
a.Be clear. Use Standard English and do not abbreviate. Spell check, revise and edit your messages before sending them. Use app
ropriate subject lines that reflect the content of the message. 
b.Be polite and careful. Do not use ALL UPPERCASE LETTERS!!! or multiple exclamation marks, as it is sometimes difficult to und
erstand the tone of the message. Similarly, avoid sarcasm and irony, which can be misinterpreted by the reader. 
5.Students will be expected to dedicate an average of 10-12 hours per week per course. 
6.Students are expected to acquire all materials by the start of the course (but no later than the 3rd day of the 1st week of t
he course). This includes textbooks, publications, and software that are listed in the course syllabus as "required." 
7.Students are expected to participate regularly in every posted discussion board in your respective courses. 
8.At an absolute minimum, students must be logged into the online class system at least four separate days each week.
9.All written assignments are due prior to 12 AM (midnight, PST) on the posted due date. Some course activities, such as postin
g messages to a discussion board, may be due during the week.  Students will always have up until 11:59 PM (PST) on the posted 
due date to complete mid-week activities. 
10.Students should have a dedicated computer with a recent version of Microsoft Office (or Open Office) installed. Word documen
ts will be exchanged in the .doc format. All written assignments must be submitted as Microsoft Word Document File attachments 
or the file format specified. No other formats will be supported.
11.Students should be comfortable using Microsoft Office tools (or Open Office), e-mail, file exchange, zipping files, navigati
ng an online course environment.
12.The following software should be download and installed:
a.7-Zip or IZarc file compression software [Google IZarc download or .7Zip download]

Online Collaboration Tools:
There are several effective and engaging communication tools to assist in answering questions and working with the instructor o
n programs. These tools foster a sense of belonging in the class and lend a personal and encouraging touch to your hard work. S
ome of the tools can be a little fussy due to the technology; however, they are well worth the effort and will be used weekly i
n the class for one-one meetings and online office hours.

Grading Expectations:
A's: Outstanding, Superior.  Written work is presented using StandardEnglish and demonstrates a mastery of the subject matter f
or the college level.  Meets all course expectations promptly.  Shows clear grasp of concepts and demonstrates ability to synth
esize materials from both inside and outside the classroom.  Participates regularly and materially in the classroom.
 
B's: Good.  Clearly above average.  Written work is presented using StandardEnglish with only a few minor flaws and demonstrate
s expertise in the subject matter for the college level.  Meets course expectations promptly.  Shows a grasp of concepts and de
monstrates ability to relate materials from both inside and outside the classroom.  Participates regularly and materially in th
e classroom.
 
C's: Average.  Student meets minimal expectations for the course.  Written work is presented using StandardEnglish with minor f
laws too numerous to overlook.  Student follows directions, shows a reasonable grasp of the subject matter for the college leve
l.  Meets all course expectations promptly.  Student also demonstrates ability to process materials from both inside and outsid
e the classroom.  Participates in the classroom.
 
D's: Below expectations.  Below that which one would normally expect from a student at this level of a college career.  Writing
 is marred by major mechanical problems.  Exam performance fails to demonstrate a reasonable grasp of the material for the coll
ege level.  Student fails to meet with professor.  Student fails to participate appropriately in class.
 
F: Unacceptable.  Written work consistently falls below college level.  Writing is marred by major mechanical problems.  Studen
t fails to report to the Writing Centeror other appropriate help.  Student is consistently late in meeting course expectations.
   The student shows little or no grasp of concepts and is unable to process or relate materials from inside and outside the cl
assroom.  Exam performance fails to establish minimal grasp of the subject matter for the college level.  Student fails to meet
 with professor.  Student fails to participate appropriately in class.  Alternatively, regardless of the quality of a student's
 work, this grade may be assigned for failure to comply with attendance policy for the course, failing to submit papers, plagia
rism, or cheating.