GOPHERSPACE.DE - P H O X Y
gophering on sdf.org

"ALL questions are GOOD questions!" - "This is YOUR course!"

Term:  Fall 2011

Class meeting times: Tu-Th   1:00 p.m – 3:45 p.m.
Location: Main Campus CAB-213
Instructor: William J. (Joe) Welch 
Phone: (831) 275-0853

E-mail: jwelch@jafar.hartnell.edu    Feel free to contact me at any time. Please include the following information in the subje
ct of any e-mail that you send to me: "Hartnell CSS-1 [Your name]".  Your e-mails reflect your interest and capabilities – co
mpose your e-mails using correct grammar and syntax. All class e-mails should reflect business English (correct syntax, grammar
, no abbreviations. Sign e-mails with your full name, including middle initial.)

A. Course Description: A survey of topics such as algorithms, hardware, programming languages, computer applications, artificia
l intelligence and the fundamentals of programming. This course is taught using the Python programming language. Considerable l
ab work in addition to regularly scheduled hours will be necessary.

B. Course Objectives:
• Overview of Computer Science 
• Binary Values and Number Systems 
• Data Representation 
• Gates and Circuits 
• Computing Components 
• Problem Solving and Program Design 
• Low-Level Programming Languages 
• High-Level Programming Languages 
• Abstract Data Types and Algorithms 
• Operating Systems 
• File Systems and Directories 
• Information Systems 
• Artificial Intelligence 
• Simulation and Other Applications 
• Networks 
• The World Wide Web 
• Limitations of Computing

C. Attendance Policy: If you anticipate attendance problems, please let me know as soon as possible. If you are running late, a
nd arrive late to class, we will work on making up the material. The Hartnell attendance policy is that a student will be disen
rolled when the accumulated absences equal 2 weeks of class. If you are aware of an absence beforehand, please send me an e-mai
l.  Coursework and class information covered during a missed class remains the responsibility of the absent student, and should
 be completed prior to the beginning of the next class. Late arrivals or early departures without prior notice (e-mail or phone
 call) will count as an absence.

D. Required Texts: (Bring both textbook and lab manual to all class sessions.)
• Connecting with Computer Science; Author: Anderson
• Starting Out w/Python; Author: Gaddis
• Portable USB drive hard drive (more than 160 GB available storage - powered by USB cable, not separate power cable)
• Hartnell CAT Card – registered with library (necessary for research activities and access to online databases) 
E. Course Web Site: (http://xlnlearning.moodlehub.com) You will be enrolled in this web site prior to the first day of the clas
s. All documents handed out in class will also be posted on the class web site. If a document is misplaced, please refer to thi
s site for a new copy. Also, quizzes and surveys may be placed on this site.  Updates to the class and tips for programming wil
l be placed on this web page
Username: first initial + last name
Password: student – must be changed after the first log in
F. Study Buddy: Exchange phone numbers/e-mail addresses with a classmate on the first evening of class. Support each other with
 studying and checking on class assignments


G. Homework: Every effort should be made to stay up with the class reading and class assignments. Please note:
• It is very important to stay up to date regarding class reading and class homework assignments. The effort to complete the
 homework will vary. Assignments are due     on the date indicated (please check the course web site if you have any questions 
regarding   the specific due date. Credit will not be awarded for assignments turned in after the due   date. 
• Reading assignments will be required EVERY night for the duration of the course. The reading assignments on the syllabus l
isting should be done BEFORE the indicated sessions. For example, if the lecture session on Tuesday covers Chapter 2, then the 
reading for Chapter 2 should be done prior to class.  
• The effort to complete the course activities will involve work outside of class, please refer to the computer lab hours to
 appropriately arrange your hours and schedule. 
• Extra credit assignments: Each student may select up to three extra credit assignments (10 possible points each assignment
). The available assignments will be discussed in class. To select an EC assignment, consult with me and we will exchange e-mai
ls on the definition of the assignment. You will then have two weeks to complete the assignment (no extensions).  
• EC Assignment 1: Due 30 Sep
• EC Assignment 2: Due 31 Oct
• EC Assignment 3: Due 30 Nov


H. Quizzes and Exams: These challenges are designed to evaluate your understanding of the fundamental principles discussed in t
he textbook and during the class presentation. They are to reinforce and focus the student's effort. The quiz and problems will
 be very similar to the homework assignments. Ultimately, as with all we do, these quizzes and tests serve to assist learning t
he topics of the course. If you have questions regarding a topic, after the exam or quiz is reviewed, let's discuss the content
. We will have three exams (approximately 50 minutes each) during the course. The last exam will be a comprehensive exam.

I. Programming Assignments: 

• All programming projects are to be individual projects, created according to the Style Guide description, and must represe
nt the student's own work. 
• Software development is, at its core, a collaborative, group-based activity. Significant software projects are very rarely
 the product of a single person these days, and learning how to work in teams is an essential component of a software education

• That said, you cannot work effectively in a group if you do not bring some skills to the table. Consequently, in this cour
se, I ask --that all of your programming work be absolutely independent (unless I explicitly announce in writing that a particu
lar programming assignment is collaborative).  We have set up the sequence of programming assignments to try to ensure your suc
cess; using someone else's work will not move you toward personal success, and will ill-prepare you for subsequent courses. Com
e to me if you need help. 

J. Course Outline: 
• We will follow the sequence of topics in the course schedule very closely. At the end of class each evening I will summari
ze the concepts covered in that particular class and provide the reading to be done prior to the next class session. Please com
plete the prescribed reading before the class session. 
• It is very important to stay up to date regarding class reading and class programming projects. Programming and lab assign
ments are due on the date indicated (please check the course web site if you have any questions regarding the specific due date
). The penalty for late turn in will be 50% deduction for assignments turned in within one week of the date. Note: We encourage
 personal excellence and accountability: The assignments are due before the date/times provided.  Please let me know as soon as
 possible if you have any questions or concerns.


K. What is a Tidbit? 
A Tidbit is the student’s opportunity to investigate and explain a new technology, feature or applica
tion in an area relating to the topic of the course. Explaining the new modulation schemes for copper wiring would be an excell
ent Tidbit. Also, emerging applications of IT in supporting businesses or education is also and excellent Tidbit. Please check 
the schedule for the Tidbit assignments and come to class prepared to discuss your Tidbit. At a minimum, explain the new topic 
fully and provide an understanding to the application or value of the new topic. We will discuss methods to remain aware of cur
rent events and technologies, providing a stream of information from which to select Tidbits.

L. Grading:  The course grade is computed as follows: 

Quizzes:  10 points for each quiz   (approx 10-15 quizzes)
Exams:  100 points each exam     (3 exams)
Programming Projects :  points for each programming project as assigned

M. Homework: Every effort should be made to stay up with the class reading and class assignments. Please note:
• It is very important to stay up to date regarding class reading and class homework assignments. The effort to complete the
 homework will vary. Assignments are due     on the date indicated (please check the course web site if you have any questions 
regarding   the specific due date. Credit will not be awarded for assignments turned in after the due   date. 
• Reading assignments will be required EVERY night for the duration of the course. The reading assignments on the syllabus l
isting should be done BEFORE the indicated sessions. For example, if the lecture session on Tuesday covers Chapter 2, then the 
reading for Chapter 2 should be done prior to class.  
• The effort to complete the course activities will involve work outside of class, please refer to the computer lab hours to
 appropriately arrange your hours and schedule. 
• Extra credit assignments: Each student may select up to three extra credit assignments (10 possible points each assignment
). The available assignments will be discussed in class. To select an EC assignment, consult with me and we will exchange e-mai
ls on the definition of the assignment. You will then have two weeks to complete the assignment (no extensions).  
• EC Assignment 1: Due 30 Sep
• EC Assignment 2: Due 31 Oct
• EC Assignment 3: Due 30 Nov
N.  Student Responsibilities:
• Students will be expected to dedicate an average of 8-12 hours per week per course. 
• Students are expected to acquire all materials by the start of the course (but no later than the 3rd day of the 1st week o
f the course). This includes textbooks, publications, and hardware/software items that are listed in the course syllabus as "re
quired." 
• Students are expected to participate regularly in every posted discussion board in your respective courses. 
• At an absolute minimum, students must be logged into the online class system at least three separate days each week. Some 
course activities, such as posting messages to a discussion board, may be due during the week.  
• You are expected to store all of your, and to maintain proper disk-based and hard-copy backups of all of your work.  You s
hould make a backup of your work disk at the end of each session.  Never erase documents or files from your work disk until all
 evaluation on them is complete.  Losing or damaging your disk is not considered a valid excuse for turning in late assignments

• Cheating is unacceptable and will result in a failing grade in this course. This includes plagiarism.  It is your respons
ibility to understand what this means. If you have questions about what constitutes plagiarism, 1) type in “plagiarism” in 
Google; or 3) talk to me.
• A treasured value of a college environment great is the explicit purpose to be a place to share ideas and perspectives.  
Accordingly, in our class and the classrooms we use will be one in which each voice is respected, diverse views and inquiry are
 encouraged. 
• Be in the classroom when class starts, remain until the end of class, attend class regularly, and participate in class dis
cussions and exercises.  
• DO NOT work on the computer, use the printer or talk among yourselves when your instructor is lecturing or leading the cla
ss in a discussion or exercise.  ALL MONITORS WILL BE OFF. At no time is playing on the computer or saving to the hard drive al
lowed.  
•  Be prepared for every class, read the appropriate material in the textbook before class time.
• Ask a classmate for information covered during your absence or tardiness.  
• You are expected to turn in completed assignments at the stated due date/time, or else they will be considered late There 
is no credit for late assignments.
• You are expected to keep the computer labs neat and clean.  NO FOOD, DRINK, OR TOBACCO products are allowed in the labs.
• Absolutely no cell phone use in class – including breaks. Please take cell phone outside to use.

O. Participation Regular participation in this course is vital. Regular participation is accomplished via turning in assignment
s, participating in class, asking questions and doing well on quizzes and exams. Each section builds on prior lessons and conce
pts....so, ask questions if a topic is fuzzy or unclear.  This is a college level class with appropriate reading, reflection, a
nalysis and writing – we will develop tools pertinent to many classes. If you need a few references on any subject, let me kn
ow!

P. Conduct of Class Sessions

• Turn in homework
• Quiz on prior class’s discussion
• Presentation and discussion
• Lab Exercises
Breaks will be scheduled during the period

The lab assignments will be hands on and serve to emphasize the points in discussed in class. The lab assignments will be done 
in teams to aid the discussion and learning among the students.

Q.  Performance goals:
A's: Outstanding, Superior.  Written work is presented using standard English and demonstrates a mastery of the subject matter 
for the college level.  Meets all course expectations promptly.  Shows clear grasp of concepts and demonstrates ability to synt
hesize materials from both inside and outside the classroom.  Participates regularly and materially in the classroom.
 
B's: Very Good.  Clearly above average.  Written work is presented using standard English with only a few minor flaws and demon
strates expertise in the subject matter for the college level.  Meets course expectations promptly.  Shows a grasp of concepts 
and demonstrates ability to relate materials from both inside and outside the classroom.  Participates regularly and materially
 in the classroom.
 
C's: Good.  Average.  Student meets minimal expectations for the course.  Written work is presented using standard English with
 minor flaws too numerous to overlook.  Student follows directions, shows a reasonable grasp of the subject matter for the coll
ege level.  Meets all course expectations promptly.  Student also demonstrates ability to process materials from both inside an
d outside the classroom.  Participates in the classroom.
 
D's: Below expectations.  Below that which one would normally expect from a student at this level of a college career.  Writing
 is marred by major mechanical problems.  Exam performance fails to demonstrate a reasonable grasp of the material for the coll
ege level.  Student fails to meet with professor.  Student fails to participate appropriately in class.
 
F: Unacceptable.  Written work consistently falls below college level.  Writing is marred by major mechanical problems.  Studen
t fails to report to the Writing Center or other appropriate help.  Student is consistently late in meeting course expectations
.   The student shows little or no grasp of concepts and is unable to process or relate materials from inside and outside the c
lassroom.  Student fails to participate appropriately in class.  Alternatively, regardless of the quality of a student's work, 
this grade may be assigned for failure to comply with attendance policy for the course, failing to submit papers, plagiarism, o
r cheating.