GOPHERSPACE.DE - P H O X Y
gophering on raymii.org
This is a text-only version of the following page on https://raymii.org:
---
Title       :  Here be dragons, or, invalidated iterators
Author      :  Remy van Elst
Date        :  03-05-2020
URL         :  https://raymii.org/s/blog/Here_be_dragons_or_invalidated_iterators.html
Format      :  Markdown/HTML
---



Recently I had a new "first-time" moment. You know the ones, the, "oh right", moments, 
after you put in a bit of research. Mine was, as you might expect from all the 
other recent content, related to C++. I learned, the hard way, that `iterator-based
for loops` don't like to be resized during the loop. Well, they don't really care,
but some precautions are to be taken since the `iterator` used in the loop might
be invalidated. Or as the very helpfull error during the crash prints to the
console, `munmap_chunk(): invalid pointer` and your debugger points you to 
somewhere deep in `new_allocator.h`. In this article I'll give a few examples,
both using index based for loops and iterator based for loops, plus some more 
details on what's going on with iterator invalidation.

 Consider sponsoring me on Github. It means the world to me if you show you
r appreciation and you'll help pay the server costs.

 Y
ou can also sponsor me by getting a Digital Ocean VPS. With this referral link you'll get $100 credit for 60 days. 
 >


Here's a picture of the screen that CLion, my editor of choice gave when the crash
occurs:

![clion][1]


The crash only occured when I used an iterator based for loop, not when I used
a index based for loop, leaving the rest of the code unchanged. As I'd never 
seen this happen before and never seen or heard of iterator invalidation before,
it was quite the learning experience. Lots of information available on interator
invalidation, [this page][3] on cppreference has an overview of what operations
invalidate an iterator for what type of container you use.


### Iterators

Back to the beginning, a brief overview of iterators. The best [simple][2] description
I could find is the following one:

> Iterator: a pointer-like object that can be incremented with `++`, dereferenced
with `*`, and compared against another iterator with `!=`.  
     
Every STL container provides iterators, and if you make your own containers, it's
beneficial to also make sure that, if applicable, also can be iterated over. This
allows you to make more generic code, or later on change the underlying implementation
without also changing all the users of the code (assuming they use iterators).

For example, the following index based `for` loop works for a `std::vector`:

    std::vector v {0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5};
    for (size_t i = 0; i < v.size(); ++i) {
        std::cout << v.at(i) << " ";
    }

Output:

    0 1 2 3 4 5

This form of looping only works on sequential random access containers like
`std::vector` or `std::array`, but not for a `std::list`, or an associative
container like `std::map`.

The equivalent iterator based for loop looks like this:

    std::vector v {0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5};
    for (auto it = v.begin(); it != v.end(); ++it) {
        std::cout << *it << " ";
    } 

Output:

    0 1 2 3 4 5

You access the current element via the `*` dereference operator, like a pointer. 
Also note that the conditional expression in the for loop (`it != v.end()`) is 
an equality comparison whereas the indexed for loop uses an less-than comparison.
The reason why is explained [here quite well][4].

The above format can also be expressed in a range based for loop:

    std::vector v {0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5};
    for (int & i : v) {
        std::cout << i << " ";
    }


To summarize, if you are iterating with an index you are assuming:

* that its content is ordered
* that its content can be obtained by an index
* that the index increment will hit every item
* that the index starts at zero

With an iterator, you are saying `give me everything so I can work with it`. 

### Iterator invalidation and for loops

If you understand how pointers work and why you shouldn't write to pointers 
that have been deleted, you can skip this section. Otherwise, if you, like me, 
had a bit of trouble with grasping iterator invalidation, read on.

A for loop, as [described here][5], often has three parts:

    for ( init statement; condition ; iteraton expression) 
        statement

The first part is often the assignment (`size_t i = 0`, `auto it = v.begin();`). 
The second part is the check if the loop has to stop (`i < v.size()`, `it != v.end()`) 
and the third part is what the loop has to do if the check is not true yet 
(`++i`, `++it`). 

The `init statement` is executed only once. The `condition` and `iteration expression` 
are executed repeatedly (before each iteration) until the value of `condition` becomes `false`.

Just for fun, think about what would happen if the init statement was also executed
before every iteration. How could a loop ever work if that happened.

The following explanation is simplified to help you wrap your head around the 
whole concept. 

* The iterator `auto it = v.begin()` is sort of a glorified
pointer. 
* If you do something to the vector inside the loop, `it` might point to
memory that no longer contains the vector. 
* Resizing a vector, or doing a `push_back` inside the loop, might result in: 
  * A new, bigger vector being allocated
  * The elements copied from the old vector to the new vector
  * The old vector being deleted.
* The `it` iterator (that was assigned in the init statement in the for loop), is
still pointing to the  memory containing the old vector.
* It is unaware a new bigger vector in a different location is now being used, 
* Unless you explicitly tell it by updating the iteraror.


### Example code

The code I wrote had to do something with every element in the vector, and if
the last element matched a set of conditions, it should add one more element
to the vector. The index based for loop example:

    std::vector v {0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5};
    for (size_t i = 0; i < v.size(); ++i) {
        if (v.at(i) == 5 and (i+1) == v.size()) {
            v.resize(v.size() + 1);
            v.at(i + 1) = 999;
            v.at(i) = 0;
        }
    }

If the last element is `5`, then add a new element `999` and set the current element
to `0`.

The iterator based example, that crashes:

    std::vector v {0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5};
    for (auto it = v.begin(); it != v.end(); ++it) {
        if (*it == 5 && std::next(it) == v.end()) {
            v.resize(v.size() + 1);
            *std::next(it) = 999;
            *it = 0;
        }
    }

The fix is quite simple, we must explicitly tell the iterator that it has changed. 
In my case I set the iterator to the current element (`v.size() - 2`). The next 
loop iteration then continues with the new element.

    std::vector v {0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5};
    for (auto it = v.begin(); it != v.end(); ++it) {
        if (*it == 5 && std::next(it) == v.end()) {
            v.resize(v.size() + 1);
            it = std::next(v.begin(), v.size() - 2);
            *std::next(it) = 999;
            *it = 0;
        }
    }


### Conclusion

Now that I grasp it all, the entire concept is simple and clear. But, isn't that
always the case when you've lost something, it is is always in the last location
you look for it. Unfortunately peanut butter.


[1]: /s/inc/img/clion_invalid_pointer.png
[2]: https://users.cs.northwestern.edu/~riesbeck/programming/c++/stl-iterators.html
[3]: https://en.cppreference.com/w/cpp/container
[4]: https://stackoverflow.com/questions/6673762/why-is-used-with-iterators-instead-of
[5]: https://en.cppreference.com/w/cpp/language/for

---

License:
All the text on this website is free as in freedom unless stated otherwise. 
This means you can use it in any way you want, you can copy it, change it 
the way you like and republish it, as long as you release the (modified) 
content under the same license to give others the same freedoms you've got 
and place my name and a link to this site with the article as source.

This site uses Google Analytics for statistics and Google Adwords for 
advertisements. You are tracked and Google knows everything about you. 
Use an adblocker like ublock-origin if you don't want it.

All the code on this website is licensed under the GNU GPL v3 license 
unless already licensed under a license which does not allows this form 
of licensing or if another license is stated on that page / in that software:

    This program is free software: you can redistribute it and/or modify
    it under the terms of the GNU General Public License as published by
    the Free Software Foundation, either version 3 of the License, or
    (at your option) any later version.

    This program is distributed in the hope that it will be useful,
    but WITHOUT ANY WARRANTY; without even the implied warranty of
    MERCHANTABILITY or FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE.  See the
    GNU General Public License for more details.

    You should have received a copy of the GNU General Public License
    along with this program.  If not, see .

Just to be clear, the information on this website is for ment for educational 
purposes and you use it at your own risk. I do not take responsibility if you 
screw something up. Use common sense, do not rm -rf / as root for example. 
If you have any questions then do not hesitate to contact me.

See https://raymii.org/s/static/About.html for details.