GOPHERSPACE.DE - P H O X Y
gophering on gopher.beastieboy.net
  ____________________

   PUMP UP THE VOLUME

     Nicolas Herry
  ____________________


       2017/12/27





1 Pump up the volume
====================

  I had an itch to scratch this morning: I wanted to play a bit with
  functions in the Korn Shell. After all, it's one of the reasons I
  decided to switch from the `tcsh' earlier this year. Then, I realised
  it's been a million years since I've written any shell, and even more
  so that I've read some `ksh' code. So, how does this work again? Below
  is a simple and quick memento on the very basics of `ksh' programming.


1.1 Declaring a function
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

  This is as easy as:
  ,----
  | function M {
  |     echo "mixer"
  | }
  `----

  Alternatively, a function can be declared in a C-style form:
  ,----
  | M() {
  |     echo "mixer"
  | }
  `----
  There really is no difference between the two styles in terms of
  functionalities.


1.2 Piping to a function
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

  Piping to a function is as easy as asking the function to read from
  standard input. This can be done as follows:
  ,----
  | function A {
  |     read stdin
  | }
  `----


1.3 Comparing strings
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

  Since `ksh' is POSIX-compliant, it implements the complete set of
  regex matching plumbing (and then some more, as I've discovered). A
  simple check goes like this:
  ,----
  | function R  {
  |     read stdin
  |     pattern='.*:$'
  |     vols=""
  |   
  |     if [[ $stdin =~ $pattern ]]; then
  |       # ...
  | }
  `----


1.4 Playing with numbers
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

  This is another spot where I believe `ksh' goes beyond what is
  required by the POSIX standard. You can do any of the four basic
  operations, as well as more advanced stuff, like bit-shifting or
  bitwise logic. Anyting between `$((' and `))' is considered to be an
  arithmetic expression. Here's an example:
  ,----
  | function R {
  |     # ...
  |     if [[ $stdin =~ $pattern ]]; then
  |       volr=$(($RANDOM & 15));
  |       vols="${stdin}+${volr}";
  |     else
  |       voll=$(($RANDOM & 15));
  |       vols="${stdin} +${voll}:";
  |     fi
  |     
  |     echo $vols
  | }
  `----
  The interesting bit is the `&', which is the same operator you find in
  languages like C. Note that the Korn shell also provides an easy way
  to generate pseudo-random numbers via the usage of the reserved
  `$RANDOM' variable.


1.5 Capturing the output of a command
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

  Capturing the ouput of a variable is done very intuitively:
  ,----
  | function S {
  |   read stdin
  |   result=$($stdin)
  |   echo $result
  | }
  `----


1.6 Making it all available
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

  To make your functions available to both your scripts and your
  interactive sessions, it is generally recommended you either group
  them in a nice set of files that would contitute a library, or give
  them each their own file. Place these files somewhere in your home (I
  would go for `~/functions', to go with `~/bin') and edit both `PATH'
  and `FPATH', in `~/.kshrc' or `~/.profile' to include this directory:
  ,----
  | # ~/.kshrc
  | # ...
  | # ...
  | PATH=$PATH:~/functions; export PATH
  | FPATH=$FPATH:~/functions; export PATH
  `----


1.7 Putting it together
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

  The last bit of advice I would give would be that when you lose
  patience, you don't lose your sense of humour. For example, if you've
  been paying attention ot the examples, you have already noticed that
  the complete set of functions goes like this:
  ,----
  | function M {
  |   echo "mixer"
  | }
  | 
  | function A {
  |   read stdin
  |   echo "$stdin vol"
  | }
  | 
  | function R {
  |   read stdin
  |   pattern='.*:$'
  |   vols=""
  |   
  |   if [[ $stdin =~ $pattern ]]; then
  |      volr=$(($RANDOM & 15));
  |      vols="${stdin}+${volr}";
  |   else
  |      voll=$(($RANDOM & 15));
  |      vols="${stdin} +${voll}:";
  |   fi
  |   echo $vols
  | }
  | 
  | function S {
  |   read stdin
  |   result=$($stdin)
  |   echo $result
  | }
  `----
  But how is this funny in any way? Simply because I can now do the
  following in a shell:
  ,----
  | $ M|A|R|R|S
  | Setting the mixer vol from 5:5 to 18:16.
  | $ 
  `----
  Yes, I can type `M|A|R|R|S' and [Pump up the volume][1]. I know.


[Pump up the volume] https://www.youtube.com/watch?v%3Dw9gOQgfPW4Y



Footnotes
_________

[1] Well, a friend of mine didn't find this funny at all, but she can
get lost on another planet. As I've heard, Mar(r)s needs women anyway.