GOPHERSPACE.DE - P H O X Y
gophering on eyeblea.ch
* What is an eyeblea.ch account?

When you create a new eyeblea.ch account, what you're getting is a
user account on a multi-user, time-sharing Unix server.

* What is Unix?

Unix is the operating system that runs the world.  iPhones, Android,
MacOS, Linux, FreeBSD, ... these and more are all types of Unix.
eyeblea.ch is a particular bare-bones (or pure, if you prefer)
example.

* How can I learn more about Unix?

The best place to start is with the FreeBSD Handbook, which is
available at gopher://eyeblea.ch/freebsd-handbook.txt.

* What can I do with my account?

Many things, including:

 + Creating content that gets automagically published on Gopher
 (similar in concept to the World Wide Web, but simpler).

 + Chatting with other online eyeblea.ch users, on the local IRC
 server.  This is live chat, with no message history kept.

 + Reading and posting messages to the groups on the local Usenet
 server.  This is analogous to a discussion forum or BBS; messages are
 threaded, and history is kept.

 + Sending mail to, and receiving mail from, other eyeblea.ch users.
 This is email, but limited solely to other users of the system.

* How can I get started?

Just log in with the SSH command you were given when you created an
account.  After changing your password, log in again, and you'll be
shown a list of commands and what they do.  Typing 'help' (without the
quotes) and pressing Enter will display the list of commands again.

* How can I find out more about a particular command?

Use the 'man' (short for 'manual') command.  For example, the
newsreader program is called 'tin'.  'man tin' will display the manual
for tin.

* How can I get help?

The best way is live chat on IRC.  Launch it with 'irc', then issue
the command '/join #thelounge'.  There you'll usually find someone to
answer your questions.

* How do I publish content on Gopher?

Just create files in your ~/public_gopher directory.

* Are there any rules?

Kindness, legality, netiquette.

Remember that you're running on a time-sharing system without disk or
CPU quotas, and don't hog resources.