GOPHERSPACE.DE - P H O X Y
gophering on baud.baby
                                                 ________  ________  ________   
   2020-05-24                                   /        \/        \/    /   \  
                                               /       __/         /_       _/ 
   I saw something on Twitter  a month or so  /        _/         /         / 
ago that  I thought was  mildly  interesting  \_______/_\___/____/\___/____/_
and   it  got   me   thinking.   There's   a    /        \/        \/    /   \
social/political  cartoonist  on there who's   /        _/         /_       _/
getting some traction but is an asshat. Some  /-        /        _/         /
of his work is  quite clever though, whether  \________/\________/\___/____/
it's agreeable or not.

   It might be just me but I  feel like that is  the role of  a cartoonist, to
lampoon  everyone, "good"  or "bad" and if  your character or your ideology is
too fragile to survive a joke at  their expense without outrage then maybe you
need to take a good look at why.

   Anyway, I don't want to soapbox.

   The brief sideshow  got me thinking  about H.P. Lovecraft  and how, despite
having a  reputation as  being  xenophobic and  notoriously racist, even for a
time when racism was prominent, his works  are highly valued by people who are
staunchly against those things.

   How often do  you see cutesy  Cthulhu merch side-by-side  on a store  shelf
with  progressive   titles  like  Steven  Universe?  How often do  you  see  a
cute-thulu or Hello Cthulhu badge adorning someone's coat or bag, side-by-side
with badges proclaiming their pronouns and sexuality?

   It's a curious pop culture blind spot.

   But it's also a really good example of why  being able to separate art from
artist is  important.  Lovecraft's stories  are fantastic,  he quickly  builds
these haunting, fantastic  worlds in only a handful  of pages and even to this
day his works  retain their shine. They've  been so influential  on so much of
horror since, too.  It's hard to imagine what the  horror landscape would look
like without Lovecraft's influence.

   A world where those stories were  censored, shunned  or  socially forbidden
would truly be poorer for it.

   I quipped on  fedi that it's real  strength of generation  X to be  able to
make that  distinction between art and artist  and enjoy "problematic" content
and media without being changed by it and I feel like it's something difficult
for  younger  generations  to understand,  especially in a  post-social  media
world. It's hard to  explain to  someone who  routinely "fears for their life"
from throw-away statements by nobodies  on Twitter that it's possible to enjoy
something like  Song of the  South for example, for  the storytelling  and the
beauty of the animation alone and not have it immediately turn you into a card
carrying member of the KKK.

   Actually,  now  that I  think about it,  Disney is  probably  another  good
example of this blind spot.

   I'm rambling now but before I  vanish back into the ether I want to share a
kind of personal anecdote. There's two people I orbit and both of them produce
loosely similar content who's focus  is digital preservation. One I find quite
obnoxious,  he's hyper-political,  dismissive  and rude  to  people  providing
criticism and, while I'd never say he takes credit for other people's work, he
certainly  doesn't  promote  the people  doing  the work as  much as the  work
itself.  If  it's  something  he's  done, he'll  put  his  name on it, if it's
something someone else  has done you'll  usually see him say  "we" or name the
project. The  other  person is  largely apolitical or  keeps his  politics  to
himself,  he's genuine and open and welcomes conversation and criticism and he
thanklessly dedicates himself to his work.

   The  content  from  person one is  generally  welcomed on the  Internet and
considered  proper, the content  from person two is generally frowned upon and
considered problematic  but in this  context, his  "art"  is  his  ability  to
continue  to  produce the content  and less the content  itself. It's  hard to
explain without providing a lot of background but bear with me.

   Here's the rub;  because the content  from person one  is approved  of, any
reservations  I have  about the  content because of  the  content  creator are
expected to be shrugged off by separating art  from artist but in the reverse,
the content  is bad  but the  artist is good - and if I  explained to  you the
nature of the  "art" and  the unbelievable  resilience of  the artist  without
context of who it was or why they were doing what they do you would be shocked
- I'm not afforded the luxury of that  same separation. I'm not allowed to say
that I like and respect this person for how they're doing what they do because
why they do what they do is viewed by some as wrong.

   It's  only  acceptable for  me to  separate art  from artist when  it suits
people who  don't  have the need. They like the art, they  like the  artist, I
need to shut  up and lump it. They hate the art, they hate the artists, I need
to shut up and lump it.



EOF