GOPHERSPACE.DE - P H O X Y
gophering on baud.baby
                                                 ________  ________  ________   
   2020-04-19                                   /        \/        \/    /   \  
                                               /       __/         /_       _/ 
   Hello!  Wow.  It's been a minute? Suffice  /        _/         /         / 
it to say that life has gotten in the way to  \_______/_\___/____/\___/____/_
some  really  ugly levels,  but  I'll  write    /        \/        \/    /   \
about that later. I'm hoping the inspiration   /        _/         /_       _/
I'm  feeling  to  complete  this  file  will  /-        /        _/         /
catapult me back in to writing, I have a lot  \________/\________/\___/____/
to  say.  I've also  rejoined  fedi  (yeah I
know) which is somewhat hindering my drive to write.  Blowing off those little
bits of steam means I  rarely build up enough pressure to rattle out something
long form. If you want to find me, I'm @cat@hackers.town. They're good people,
and very interesting!

   When life gets real  bad, or my  mental health suffers, I generally retreat
deep into nostalgia. It gives me somewhere comfortable, safe and unchanging to
hide and accumulate orgone. One space I've found a real wealth of nostalgia is
the Internet Archive's VHS Vault[1].

   I think  I've written  somewhere before, maybe in-passing  on social media,
that I strongly  believe the medium is as important as the  media and it's the
combination of the two  where you really find art - for example  dungeon synth
music benefits greatly from the tape hiss and motor noise of an audio cassette
release  while  black  metal benefits  greatly from the muddy sound.  Likewise
genres like post-punk and goth rock  benefit greatly  from the warmth of vinyl
records, clicks, pops and all.

   Which brings  me back  to the VHS  Vault.  VHS goes beyond just  the medium
adding value because  VHS culture is rooted in home copying  and trading, this
was true of the  early anime scene and of concert bootlegging and movie piracy
to name a few examples.  Because of the DIY nature of it and the ease of doing
it, VHS tapes are  almost all unique.  The choice of tape, the quality  of the
VCR and the  tape or TV signal  being copied, all of these factors  modify the
result, adding their own qualities and tool marks.

   And then on top of that, time is a factor. Video tape degrades over time or
through  plays  and more modern  hardware  produces  closer copies  than older
hardware, etc.

   I find it fascinating to think  about and to explore and I  get lost in the
Vault's library for  hours, watching educational videos,  movies and TV shows,
music  television, almost anything  through the  patina of time, hardware  and
tape generations.

   It's also left me with a  desire to share what I've  found, and it's a long
list, but again I  feel like  the medium  should  honor the  media; a  YouTube
channel would be boring and has  been done to death, and just plain text links
to video files  wouldn't get much of a look beyond  some mild  interest in the
titles and filenames.  My initial thought was to try and work out some kind of
private  live streaming, I wanted it to  be similar  to how we would have done
anime fansub screenings back in the day; a private club, usually operating out
of someone's  house, people come around we  watch a few tapes  and chat  about
them.

   I might  still  do that,  I'm  not sure.  I managed  to get  a pretty  good
streaming set up that let me send  video and audio into Jitsi without too much
fuss and in higher  quality than just the baked  in screen  sharing.  It still
needs some fine-tuning though.

   I also remembered  RantMedia's old  RantTV stream and  setting up something
like that was  a really neat prospect. It's essentially just like you would do
any streaming radio  service but for video, so  there's no VOD like you'd have
with a media server and you don't need to access it through a specific website
like you would a YouTube or Twitch livestream for example, it's more analogous
to live TV in that way.

   So that's what I did! And, dear gopher, you're the first to know about it.

   Being a study in retro media,  delivered in a pretty retro way, I wanted to
align it pretty  closely with baud.baby so baud.vision  was born.  You can get
information on the project through either gopher://baud.vision or by fingering
info@baud.vision  and, most importantly  you can  tune in to  the live feed by
pointing your media player at  http://baud.vision:21225/vcr - I've only tested
it with VLC  but I'm sure it'll work with just about  anything that'll let you
connect to a remote stream.

   There's also  nowplaying@baud.vision but that broke and I'm not sure what I
did so it'll take some investigating when I have a minute.

   The backend is dead simple, it's running an Icecast server and using VLC to
stream video to localhost. I fiddled with some other  options but this was the
best way I found,  Icecast setup is  simple and VLC is a really  powerful tool
and I have a lot to learn about what I can do with it.

   I'm still  fine-tuning the setup,  mostly the VLC piece  but I also need to
set up SSL and build out the library.

   The library was probably my biggest mistake. My initial thought was to just
download a bunch of  the tapes to the local  machine and stream from there but
the VPS filled up FAST and I've barely scratched the surface of what I want to
have in the playlist.  A better option  might be  to stream  from the Internet
Archive to  the server and  then  out via  Icecast but what I  gain in storage
overhead I lose in  bandwidth so it's a trade off.  Initial tests seem to work
fine, though I had some audio issues that'll need to be ironed out. We'll see,
it's still very much a work in progress.

   I hope you enjoy the project and the videos I have in there so far. There's
a lot more I want to do so stay tuned for that!


[1] https://archive.org/details/vhsvault?sort=-addeddate



EOF