GOPHERSPACE.DE - P H O X Y
gophering on baud.baby
                                                 ________  ________  ________
   2017-06-22                                   /        \/        \/    /   \
                                               /       __/         /_       _/
   Phoning this one in a little. It was  the  /        _/         /         /
only  post  I  wrote  for  another  blog  we  \_______/_\___/____/\___/____/_
attempted that  never  really  got  off  the    /        \/        \/    /   \
ground and  it makes more sense to  bring it   /        _/         /_       _/
into this phlog where I'm actually writing.   /-        /        _/         /
                                              \________/\________/\___/____/
   A  while  back  I  asked  a  question  to
Twitter; "What makes a good dungeon master?"

   I was in a mood because a  few days earlier I'd been talking about Dungeons
& Dragons with a friend and it made me realize how much the hobby had changed.
I  felt alienated by something I genuinely loved and listening to people  talk
about it using terms like "tanking" and "DPS"  and the descriptions of endless
combat  just sounded like they  were  describing a video game. I  had a  small
tantrum about new kids ruining shit and posed my question.

   The answers I got pretty much cemented how I already felt; "They write good
campaigns",  "Props and  maps",  etc, etc. All things  less  about the dungeon
master and more about the game,  a  DM could download a campaign from the web,
complete with  printable handouts and run it effectively. Hell, some campaigns
are just a hallway of combat encounters and will essentially run themselves.

   I  thought about the question myself a bit too,  turning over what  I liked
about my friends'  games,  what I got  right and what I struggled with  in  my
games  and came to  the conclusion that it's their  agility that makes a great
dungeon  master. Anyone can put together a  great campaign  with all the bells
and whistles, maps and  minis, handouts and  props, mood  lighting  and  sound
effects, but if  your party just  wanders past  the  clue that leads  to  your
meticulously planned fantasy  fun house and off into who  knows what, you need
to be ready.

   A dungeon master shouldn't be a story  teller, they should be a facilitator
to the  collaborative  storytelling of pen & paper role playing games and it's
not the dungeon master's place  to dictate to the party  what they should  and
shouldn't do; not the races or classes they choose, not their  character's sex
or  name or background (to the extent that it  doesn't  affect  game play)  or
personality, even if this means the campaign they're running needs to change.

   It's how well  a  DM  can  improvise,  how  well  they can  adapt  and  how
seamlessly they can do it when their party inevitably zigs instead of zags but
it's also  a  willingness  to  compromise,  it's  a  poor dungeon  master  who
frantically boxes  their  party  in  with  invisible  walls  or insurmountable
obstacles to force them back on track just so they can get back to  the script
and inversely,  it's  the  strong  dungeon master who's willing  to humbly put
their lovingly crafted dungeons aside to let the collaborative story evolve.

   In addition to being  flexible with their party's whim, a good DM should be
able to apply that agility to the game itself and its rules.

   I once described Dungeons & Dragons to  Danielle,  saying something to  the
effect  of "Everyone rolls dice,  then they all lie  about the results to make
the story more interesting."

   I  was  (half)  joking but, as far as being a dungeon master is concerned I
really believe this is a good way  to approach the  game.  Cards  and maps and
miniatures and arguably even  dice are all fluff,  baubles on what is  at  its
core just  a  group  of friends sitting around telling tales,  they  shouldn't
define the game and certainly don't define what makes a good DM.  D&D,  or any
pen & paper RPG, isn't a board  game  or  a  video game and I don't think they
should be played like one. Stats and rules  and dice rolls do have a place but
the "G" should be there only to  enhance  and give some structure to the "RP",
it  shouldn't be the main  focus. Combat in a pen  &  paper RPG is rarely very
exciting, it's lots of dice rolling and scribbling and a combat-heavy campaign
is unlikely to be one that stays with your players once it's over.

   In that same  vein, a good DM shouldn't let the dice rolls  drive the game.
Sometimes a DM is  going to roll a ridiculous string of critical hits but it's
their decision whether to blindly  rely on  the dice and  tell the poor player
that their  beloved character accidentally got  beaten to  pudding by a kobold
thug and they have to roll a new one. Though I will admit, it'd be worth it to
see the look on the party's faces.

   Sometimes a natural 20 needs to be a humble 19.

   Lastly, I believe  that  a DM  needs to  apply that  agility to the players
themselves.  Sometimes  running a  campaign is like herding  cats, as  players
drift off  and discuss  other  topics,  swap Magic  cards  at the table or get
snacks and  you cannot  force people to play.  A  good dungeon master needs to
know when to change up the campaign to re-ignite the party's interest  or when
to concede that they're not  going to  get anything important done and run the
party through some casual filler until they're ready to be properly engaged.

   To conclude, because I feel like I kind of just left it hanging, a great DM
needs  to be the guide but not know the path, they need to lead and follow the
players in equal measure  and be prepared, because the players will surprise a
DM as much as a DM tries to surprise them.



EOF