GOPHERSPACE.DE - P H O X Y
gophering on hngopher.com
HN Gopher Feed (2017-12-30) - page 1 of 10
 
___________________________________________________________________
The Benefits of Economic Expansions Are Increasingly Going to the
Richest
58 points by joeyespo
https://www.nytimes.com/2014/09/27/upshot/the-benefits-of-econom...
___________________________________________________________________
 
baxtr - 55 minutes ago
Well, I guess something similar like a "land reform" would be of
helphttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Land_reform
 
TosLink2 - 53 minutes ago
The effects of globalism... Upper management stays employed and
gets richer, everyone below (the middle class previously) are out
of a job. Child labor and inhumane working conditions overseas and
mass pollution of our entire planet. How is it that progressives
actually think this is a good thing? (this is an honest question).
 
  ZeroGravitas - 49 minutes ago
  If, as Economists suggest, the total wealth is increased, then it
  could be distributed so that everyone is better off (nationally
  and globally). Generally progressive governments support policies
  that would distribute the gains in that kind of way. Non-
  progressive governments blame outgroups, steal from the powerless
  and give to the already wealthy, creating the problems you blame
  the progressives and globalism for.
 
  QAPereo - 49 minutes ago
  What makes you think that they do?
 
  beebmam - 48 minutes ago
  It doesn't have to be the effect of globalism. Redistribution of
  wealth and land is quite effective.
 
  oppositelock - 38 minutes ago
  It's not globalism, per se, globalism is a symptom of monetary
  policy implemented in tandem by most of the world's central
  banks.The root cause is that every developed nation on earth runs
  an inflationary monetary policy coupled with perpetual deficit
  spending. Money creation via central banks and deficits is not
  uniform, it pours into economies via cheap credit, subsidies,
  spending on boondoggles, and it's the people who have first
  access to this newly created money who benefit the most, and
  these tend to be the people with a lot of capital, political
  connections, etc. The average person simply sees their limited
  buying power decreasing over time.
 
    quadrangle - 8 minutes ago
    Sure, but it's not strictly the inflationary / deficit issue
    right? It's primarily (as you say) a matter of who gets the
    increased currency, right?
 
ericjang - 5 minutes ago
The analysis in this article was based on data from Thomas Piketty
and collaborators, who have also compiled an extremely detailed and
comprehensive analysis of the subject of capital & wealth &
inequality. I highly recommend Piketty's book, "Capital in the 21st
Century" (see Goodreads comments for abridged summaries and reviews
by readers). Not only is it totally convincing (and depressing),
but it also provides a very clear understanding of the course of
modern history since the 19th century. It's amazing to see how
clear economic policy (whether Marxist or Capitalist or anything in
between) becomes when viewed through the lens of society grappling
with the problem of capital/income/inequality.https://www.goodreads
.com/book/show/18736925-capital-in-the-...
 
zerostar07 - 49 minutes ago
except cryptocurrencies
 
  mark_edward - 13 minutes ago
  What? Bitcoin ownership is even more concentrated
 
  quadrangle - 6 minutes ago
  you think that the winners in wealth redistribution happening
  around cryptocurrencies are mostly the not-so-rich? There may be
  a decent number of non-rich folks who are now rich this way, but
  I doubt that cryptocurrencies are effectively working in reverse
  of the wealth-inequity trends?
 
dnautics - 40 minutes ago
Is that surprising?  Economic expansions are largely driven by
monetary (stimulus, QE) and fiscal policy (bailout,
contracting), as a part of deliberate politics ("we need to create
jobs", e.g.).  As these events are derived from centralized,
hierarchical organizations (Fed, us gov't, ECB, EC), the benefits
will disproportionately flow to those that have access; part of the
reason why the richest are the richest is because they have had
success in the past obtaining exactly that access.It's rather
ironic that the keynesian perspective in the article is that the
policies "aren't targeted" but in reality they couldn't be anything
but.
 
  [deleted]
 
  Daishiman - 23 minutes ago
  Well they could increase the amount of public spending and
  increase the tax rates for the top brackets and it has been
  historically in periods where rates of income inequality have
  gone down.But no, for some ridiculous reason those ideas seem to
  be unacceptable with the Overton Window defined by mass-media
  (conglomerate-owned, of course) and economists who propose small-
  state solutions.
 
    andrenth - 4 minutes ago
    If inequality goes down because the rich become less rich, is
    that a win?
 
Qworg - 1 hours ago
2014, but still shocking.
 
  [deleted]