GOPHERSPACE.DE - P H O X Y
gophering on hngopher.com
HN Gopher Feed (2017-12-30) - page 1 of 10
 
___________________________________________________________________
Brittleness comes from "One Thing"
61 points by gmays
https://blog.asmartbear.com/brittleness.html
___________________________________________________________________
 
jeffdavis - 2 hours ago
"Brittle" does not necessarily mean "bad". If that one marketing
channel is really all you have, and perhaps the entire reason your
company exists; then it might be fineto just admit that, make the
most of it without overextending yourself or making lots of
commitments, and then prepare for starting the next business.
 
brucephillips - 3 hours ago
What does "brittle" mean that "risky" doesn't? I don't think we
need a new word here.Also, the listed risks are cherry picked to
fit the "one thing" pattern. Risks that don't fit that pattern
include competition risk, technology risk, and financing risk.
 
  rpdillon - 3 hours ago
  I think of brittleness as a subset of risk.  Risk has a very
  large surface area, and has to be mitigated by a correspondingly
  large number of techniques.  Brittleness seems like a useful
  subset to address in the context of specific techniques that can
  avoid it.  'One thing' seems like a useful heuristic in this
  context.
 
    brucephillips - 3 hours ago
    That's a good point, except we already have a term for that as
    well. It's a single point of failure.
 
Hextinium - 4 hours ago
This can be generalized to thinking about what happens when X goes
away in your organization or team. If Bill doesn't come in tomorrow
what will happen? Planning for those cases and covering your bases
for a a more effective organization is what makes them last instead
of falling apart at the first rip off the seam.
 
jannotti - 1 hours ago
Did this blog post just try to coin the phrase "one thing" in place
of the clearer and well-known "single point of failure"?
 
  brucephillips - 1 hours ago
  Yes
 
maneesh - 3 hours ago
Brittle sounds like fragile. This article reminds me of Nassim
Taleb's amazing book, Antifragile.Fragile organizations and systems
break from randomness. Robust ones are able to resist and stay
strong. But Antifragile ones actually benefit from randomness and
volatility.I highly recommend the book -- it's highly relevant to
startup companies who, rather than shooting for the moon, should
protect their downside (at first) and place small bets on numerous
10x activities.
 
davidw - 3 hours ago
In a certain sense, having a 9 to 5 is an even more extreme version
of 'one thing' in that you have one big client that accounts for
100% of your revenue.  Of course, there are also efficiencies in
having one 'client' that are beneficial to both employee and
employer.Edit: see 'Theory of the Firm'.
 
  annabellish - 2 hours ago
  On the small scales (i.e., you or me) it can make sense to have
  your second thing be a large pot of savings, which is a
  relatively inexpensive way of providing limited redundancy.In the
  same way that a data center has full redundancy for failure of an
  individual machine, but limited redundancy for failure of the
  city's power grid, all we _really_ need is enough redundancy to
  give us time to solve the problem.Large organisations move too
  slowly for this to be an option, so they need the much more
  expensive full redundancy.
 
  johnrob - 1 hours ago
  It's rare in nature when the optimal placement of a 'dial' is at
  an endpoint (0 or 100).  In everyday life, when I see people
  making such a choice, it's usually because they focused on a
  single attribute at the expense of all other considerations (e.g.
  "cheapest" or "best battery life").  While there's value in doing
  less work, ignoring the other criteria means the choice is not
  the best.After almost two decades of professional experience
  (including a few years of consulting), I'm becoming more
  convinced that employees often make a similar 'lazy' decision
  when they choose full time employment.  That decision is only
  optimal for under performers (and only for as long as they can
  hold on to the gig).Selling labor in units of time offers no
  possibility for economic profit.  The value of any productivity
  gains are realized by the employer.  This is not the case for a
  business (or a consultant), where productivity gains yield
  profit.EDIT: Consultants sell time too, but are free to adjust
  their rates as they see fit.  Employees have significant barriers
  to changing their 'price'; infact it often involves a job change.
  Another challenge for the employee is demonstrating their value
  created due to the extremely complex structuring of most
  companies (this makes it hard to objectively justify a raise).
 
Chiba-City - 3 hours ago
Some permutation of "pair programming" helps with "mission
critical" software execution risks. We call this "the bus test" in
DC no-nonsense engineering. Project execution must survive anyone
getting "hit by a bus."It does not have to be pair-teams. It can be
3-teams that review each other's code. Crafting shared libraries
also helps focus multiple developers around code, docs, calling
semantics and help surface implicit performance expectations or
penalties early.I have been the hero developer cranking 10K lines
of C per month. But divide and conquer where software development
MATTERS isn't very wise. Methods make sense when dozens of jobs,
thousands of lives or millions of dollars are at stake every week
and month of a project.We used to call virtuous redundancy "belt
and suspenders."