GOPHERSPACE.DE - P H O X Y
gophering on hngopher.com
HN Gopher Feed (2017-12-28) - page 1 of 10
 
___________________________________________________________________
New California law allows liquor companies to pay for free rides
38 points by prostoalex
http://www.sacbee.com/news/politics-government/capitol-alert/art...
___________________________________________________________________
 
mikestew - 1 hours ago
I'm more surprised that it wasn't allowed to begin with. I mean, I
see where they were coming from with the original law, but we've
had drunk driving in the "bad" bucket for how many decades now?
Seems like it took them an inordinate amount of time to catch up
with the times.
 
  jvagner - 1 hours ago
  The article covers why it might not be a great idea.That said,
  people not having any options to get home ignores the fact that
  people are heading out to spend money on alcohol to begin with.
  Budgeting for a cab ride home seems beyond everyone's thinking,
  in this article...
 
    slavik81 - 1 hours ago
    The argument against was basically that drinking is bad, and
    that if people can safely get home after drinking, more people
    will do it. If that's the best argument the opposition had, I
    can see why this bill passed unanimously.
 
    buttersbadams - 1 hours ago
    Spending wisely + intoxication. You expect strict budgeting
    under those circumstances?
 
  sithadmin - 1 hours ago
  >we've had drunk driving in the "bad" bucket for how many decades
  now?I think you'll find that outside of larger urban areas in the
  US, drunk driving tends to fall into a gray area of morality, or
  in some cases (in my experience, very rural locales with very
  little meaningful road traffic), an accepted norm.Almost nobody I
  know that lives in an urban US area drives drunk or finds it
  acceptable. This becomes more lax among my suburban friends and
  acquaintances. For some of my more rural acquaintances, taking a
  6 pack along for consumption during a drive is typical behavior
  that nobody in their community even bats an eye at.
 
    shafyy - 23 minutes ago
    Another difference I observed is San Francisco vs. Zurich (both
    urban areas). While in Zurich very few people I know would
    drink and drive, people in SF don't seem to really care about
    being a little tipsy. Of course, this is anecdotale.
 
    bmelton - 1 hours ago
    I think this has a lot to do with a lot of things.If I'm
    working in the city, it's easy for me to say "Well, I plan to
    drink tonight, so I'll cab to the place where I'm drinking so
    that I'll have to cab from the place after I'm drinking."When
    that place is more than a $50 Uber/Lyft/Cab ride away from the
    suburbs I'm coming from, the options are limited, leaving me to
    the effort of having to curtail the amount that I drink such
    that it's safe to drive home.  The science I've heard mention
    is that you can metabolize something like 2 drinks per hour,
    which is a handy guideline, but lacks so much.  2 drinks of
    what?  3% Miller Lite isn't the same as 10% microbrews, which
    isn't the same as 40+% scotch or bourbon. Does that 2 drink
    guideline cover hard spirits in assuming the worst, or is it
    assuming the most common scenario of beer?  I have no idea.For
    me, I tend to prefer drinking at home, or at Uber/Lyftable
    distances from my home, so that I can be safe, but yeah,
    everyone's guidance differs slightly, and as someone downthread
    mentions, relying on choice of drinking safely as judgement is
    impaired by the alcohol they're drinking is fraught with peril.
 
      sithadmin - 1 hours ago
      It's definitely a multifacted issue. I suspect that income
      distribution between urban centers and other areas definitely
      plays a major role, as does a person's risk calculus
      associated with performing the act itself.As far as 'drinks
      per hour' guidelines go, that's usually standardized as a
      single unit of alcohol (e.g. 1 1.5 oz shot of 80 proof liqour
      OR 12 oz of a macrobrew lager OR 6 oz of a typical wine).
 
        brewdad - 1 minutes ago
        Yes. I've started using a "rule of 60" for estimating an
        alcohol drink's impact. Alcohol % by volume x drink size in
        oz.  A 5% beer in a 12oz bottle is equal to a 1.5 oz pour
        of 80 proof liquor. That 8oz snifter of 10% beer is worth
        80 points. Same if you order a pint of the 5% beer instead
        of a bottle.
 
    mikestew - 1 hours ago
    I grew up in a rural area and can confirm. But I haven't lived
    in a rural area for a long time, so ass-u-me-d that had changed
    along with the changes I've seen in urban and suburban areas.
    Guess not. OTOH, the roads can be pretty empty in rural South
    Dakota.
 
kodablah - 1 hours ago
I've often wondered why this wasn't the case before, though I
understand many state alcohol agencies (i.e. TABC where I live)
discourage drinking incentivization.Ride sharing companies should
now be falling over each other to sign exclusive deals with bars.
"Come to Kodablah's Bar. We'll pick you up in a Lyft and send you
home in one at no extra cost. Restrictions apply: only applies to
those within 18 miles, minimum tab of $40."
 
sedtrader - 1 hours ago
> Thousands attending Super Bowl 50 in Santa Clara in 2016 didn't
have options to get home safely after drinkingPardon my humor, but
do designated drivers exist anymore? or was that just a fad that
went out of style?
 
  djrogers - 52 minutes ago
  That?s a typical California politician?s comment. If someone else
  doesn?t provide something free or heavily subsidized, they
  pretend it doesn?t exist.Pretty dumb to ignore the fact tha buy
  cutting back on a few $12 beverages at the game one could either
  drive home or afford a Lyft...
 
    jdale27 - 15 minutes ago
    Or maybe it's just a reflection of the reality that there are
    probably a lot of people who don't want to go to a football
    game and not get drunk.
 
    rconti - 7 minutes ago
    Actually it's an anti-regulatory stance.
 
  diafygi - 1 hours ago
  I suspect that designated drivers are economically worse than
  sponsored rides. A designated driver is a person not buying
  drinks and yet still taking a spot in your capacity. If you can
  sell $1000 more drinks by sponsoring rides, and those rides cost
  $500, it's totally worth sponsoring rides.
 
    oceanswave - 1 hours ago
    Soon, analytics will find the teetotalers that are buying
    tickets and automatically  tack on a surcharge so that their
    non-drinking spot is amortized at a rate that is determined by
    the average revenue generated by a drinker. Past ticket holders
    who have shown themselves to be exceptional at both consuming
    alcoholic beverages may be eligable for a reduced price ticket.
 
      Eridrus - 36 minutes ago
      You make this seem like a bad thing, but as someone who
      doesn't drink a lot, I would prefer to pay a surcharge rather
      than deal with a 2 drink minimum.
 
        tehwebguy - 32 minutes ago
        Is there anything that has a drink minimum besides comedy
        clubs?
 
    gnicholas - 1 hours ago
    On the other hand, you can sell a parking spot if there's a DD.
    I don't know the going rate, but it's at least a couple drinks'
    worth ($45 spot = 3 x $15 beers)?On the whole, stadiums may
    prefer to have a big line of ubers/lyfts lined up to take
    people home, but it's not like it's a total loss to have DDs.
 
      xapata - 27 minutes ago
      Parking rates, while seemingly expensive, are usually
      subsidized by the other economic activity of the business.
 
      beambot - 26 minutes ago
      Except that you're paying for a lot of overhead for those
      parking spots year round... Not just during the event.
      Everything from infrastructure (land, buildings), personnel,
      etc. That's a heavy, real cost to the stadium and surrounding
      community compared to a few drinks. And that space could be
      better utilized for shops and housing.
 
      DoreenMichele - 31 minutes ago
      From a strictly economic perspective: Free rides homes may
      mean charging overtime for the spot because they leave their
      car there overnight and also selling more liquor.But I don't
      see why this should be viewed in terms of pure economics.
      What if people who make beer et al are actual human beings
      and are bothered by the fact that drunk driving kills people?
      Since their product is involved, what if some of them feel
      some personal sense of responsibility to reduce death's due
      to drunk driving?
 
        [deleted]
 
        gnicholas - 5 minutes ago
        Totally agree that it's not just a pure business decision.
        I was just responding to the sentiment of the GP that
        indicated that stadiums might be supporting plans like this
        because more drinkers means more revenue. That isn't to say
        they want people to drive drunk ? this was just comparing
        getting people home via DDs (who don't buy alcohol) or
        getting more drinkers in the stadium and getting them home
        safe on uber/lyft.
 
gnicholas - 3 minutes ago
Fun fact: at Giants Stadium in SF, you can get a wristband for a
free soda if you are a DD. Just swing by Guest Services and they'll
give you a wristband.Not-so-fun fact: you cannot redeem the
wristband for water. You literally have to get soda.