GOPHERSPACE.DE - P H O X Y
gophering on hngopher.com
HN Gopher Feed (2017-12-27) - page 1 of 10
 
___________________________________________________________________
From inboxing to thought showers: how business bullshit took over
113 points by tomduncalf
https://www.theguardian.com/news/2017/nov/23/from-inboxing-to-th...
___________________________________________________________________
 
whilestanding - 18 minutes ago
Great article, until the very end when it sounds like he wants to
come up with with some anti-bullshit bullshit. However I really did
enjoy the read especially learning about the history of bullshit
and how we got here.I think the fundamental problem he mentioned
has to be solved - "As factories producing goods in the west have
been dismantled, and their work outsourced or replaced with
automation, large parts of western economies have been left with
little to do"  This is the key issue. There just isn't enough
actual productive work to get done in many jobs and people can't
just leave when the work is done due to being payed by the hour or
being seen as lazy by their coworkers and bosses.I'm not smart
enough to give solutions to big general issues like this but I
certainly see it as a problem in my own life. I have no idea what
people actually do in most jobs these days and therefor when trying
to decide on my next career move, I have trouble estimating how
competent I would be when considering a job. Also it seems hard to
develop any real skills in most jobs these days other than learning
how to fit in and bullshit. However, those skills do not transfer
to a new position with a different 'culture'.  I've mostly worked
blue collar labor type jobs in my time and had a clear task to
complete but you end up getting pushed around by management types
and are at great risk of personal injury for very little
compensation. In my last job at a warehouse I worked my way up from
a temp labor grunt to getting pretty close to management but I
couldn't handle it. The higher up I got the less there was to do
other than bullshit consumption and production, by the end I wanted
to just go back to working with the guys on the floor (but again
you aren't making enough and risking injury every day). I hope to
find a job that I can actually do things and gain clear skills over
time, but if I can't figure that out I'll have to become another
sellout bullshitter since I'm not getting any younger and my body
isn't gonna be able to handle the hard labor in the long run.
 
cornholio - 54 minutes ago
This reads like an Adam Curtis piece: starts with an obscure
historical reference, and builds it up to  dramatic ripple efect on
the world, usually by way of a cultural shift.
 
  vermooten - 13 minutes ago
  cones
 
hitekker - 12 minutes ago
Concluding that we need an "anti-bullshit movement" to get rid of
bullshit is missing the forest for trees.Bullshit is organizational
self-deception. Comfortable statements intended to insulate leaders
and followers from uncomfortable problems.In other words, bullshit
isn't abnormal; it's natural. A reflex to maintains the status quo
while the surrounding environment decays.And, the greater that
decay, the more empty words are needed to fill in the gap . This is
true even for countries: the only North Korean state organ during
the 90's famine that worked every single day, was its propaganda
department.In my view, calling upon employers  to have the courage
to be genuine, to think and talk in more authentic ways... will
likely just give birth to yet another management fad. A movement
should neither center around vagueries, nor on each individual's
moral fiber.Instead, a better approach would be to determine what
bullshit is the everyday kind, versus the kind that is concealing
systemic failures in our present or future society, e.g. "Bullshit
jobs" -> Basic Income, or "Corporate Social Responsibility" -> Tax
Avoidance .Finding and solving the latter will reduce the need for,
and thereby existence of the, the more unbearable bullshit.
 
laretluval - 12 minutes ago
How much of the hatred of business speak is driven by resentment of
the fact that the business people usually make more money than the
people they supervise?
 
personlurking - 44 minutes ago
As someone not in the corporate world, I'd love to see more
examples of bullshit speak.What are some "favorites" from the HN
crowd?
 
  subpixel - 15 minutes ago
  I suggest watching the clips of meeting scenes from the BBC show
  W1A: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=w1a+meeting
 
    personlurking - 8 minutes ago
    I hadn't heard of this show before reading the article and aim
    to watch it. Thanks
 
  0xcde4c3db - 14 minutes ago
  Kaizen terms used in teams or organizations where kaizen is
  definitely not being practiced as a general philosophy. At a
  previous employer, the only time anyone ever actually used the
  word kaizen was to describe management being tied up in day-long
  meetings debating the nature or source of some problem.
 
  chiph - 8 minutes ago
  "Ask" as a noun.
 
  serpix - 33 minutes ago
  all the words from scrum: Standups, sprint, dailies,
  retrospectives, epics, tasks..
 
  throwaway287391 - 31 minutes ago
  "Learnings" makes me cringe.  Why is it a thing? "Lessons" is a
  perfectly good word. (Edit: see HN examples at
  https://hn.algolia.com/?query=learnings&sort=byPopularity&pr...)
 
  11thEarlOfMar - 30 minutes ago
  Many are mentioned in the article. One I particularly loathe is
  'reaching out'. In my generation, 'reaching out' is what someone
  with a serious drug or alcohol dependency did when they hit rock
  bottom and it was either get help or die. I cringe, I cringe....A
  few years ago, it was 'at the end of the day', which my boss said
  42 times in one 60 minute meeting. Yes, 42. I counted.
 
    userbinator - 7 minutes ago
    I haven't heard "reaching out" all that often, but the one that
    makes me cringe is "moving/going/looking forward." I once heard
    my boss use it 3 times in one sentence (it was something like
    "going forward, we'll ... and going forward, ... to set
    expectations going forward.") The surreal experience was
    further enhanced by the fact that none of the 6 others in the
    same meeting even seemed to notice or find it unusual.
 
    phnofive - 27 minutes ago
    This one I struggled with. What's the alternative to 'reaching
    out' in the context of sending a message to a third party?
 
      yesiamyourdad - 15 minutes ago
      "ask" ?"can you reach out to Carol and see when that will be
      done" vs "can you ask Carol when that will be done?"Ever
      since Walking Dead came out, "reach out" evokes thoughts of
      hordes of zombies grabbing for me.
 
      pwython - 9 minutes ago
      "Get in touch" could be an alternative. Careful though, don't
      turn it into a "touch base!"
 
      11thEarlOfMar - 24 minutes ago
      Call, e-mail, text or otherwise contact them.'Can you call
      Bob's surf shop and see if they carry Mr. Zog's Sex Wax?'
 
        albertgoeswoof - 18 minutes ago
        The reason reach out is used is to give the individual
        being asked some autonomy / responsibility in the action.Eg
        if you ask someone to call bobs surf shop and they don?t
        answer they might stop there or call back later. If you ask
        them to reach out they might go down there and see them,
        set up a meeting, speak to a friend that works there, etc.
 
          userbinator - 10 minutes ago
          If you ask them to reach out they might go down there and
          see them, set up a meeting, speak to a friend that works
          there, etc.That's where you can use the more general and
          succinct term, "contact".
 
    drb91 - 25 minutes ago
    I use at the end of the day; it?s a meaningless verbal tic,
    less something you could, erm, justify in a business
    context.Annoying? Oh yea.But what is wrong with reaching out?
    Seems like a different way of phrasing ?make contact with?,
    except with a connotation of intending to help.
 
      pwython - 15 minutes ago
      At the end of the day, all of these phrases aren't that bad,
      as long as you don't overuse them. eg:
      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XAaWrdMf-j0
 
  rhizome - 29 minutes ago
  http://dack.com/web/bullshit.html
 
  sailfast - 29 minutes ago
  - "Synergy" is the archetypal word that wasn't even brought up in
  the article.- "Cross-functional"- "Ping"- "Green Field"- "ROI"
  (this actually means something specific, but it's often mis-used
  to imply something like 'overall value')- "MVP" (this actually
  means something but has now been co-opted to sound agile while
  meaning 'the thing we're willing to release to users and keep our
  pride')- "A matrixed organization"- "Get everyone on the same
  page"- "Stakeholders"... many others...
 
    ubersoldat2k7 - 5 minutes ago
    Ah! MVP has lost any meaning. Better use PoC (proof of concept)
    because an MVP is just a finished product with all the bells
    and whistles because "product management" wants it all
 
  albertgoeswoof - 29 minutes ago
  Suggest we take this offline and align first before we come back
  to you by COB today. Don?t want to boil the ocean, as per my
  earlier comment.
 
  notfromhere - 26 minutes ago
  never-ending sales strategy changes that can be summed up as
  "explain the product to the right people and ask for money".
 
  fleetwood - 23 minutes ago
  We have too many to count, but some of my favorites:-Kabuki
  Dance-Coal Face-KT (Knowledge Transfer)-Across the Piece-And my
  personal Rockstar: Like Putting Socks on an OctopusOur HR group
  actually put together a wonderful "Leadership" website complete
  with a "Leadership Handbook" (Buzzword Dictionary). Of course,
  it's hidden on an obscure sub-site and is unsearchable. I've
  never met anyone else who's actually seen this site or handbook,
  but it's been fun for me!
 
skybrian - 6 minutes ago
Many of us have strong reactions to some kinds of business jargon.
But use a programming term metaphorically and we have no trouble
with it, even though people who don't have the background won't get
it.Perhaps this cringing at certain terms is not entirely rational?
 
alexasmyths - 1 hours ago
The irony is that while the words are stupid (?alignment?,
?intentionality? and ?end-state visions?) - this pretty good
actually.Most white collar jobs are full of 'waking sleep' - and if
we focus on outcomes, and drive them forward with intentional work
- we would be more productive."Bullshit jobs" - if you doing
anything to move the ball forward - like working a checkout or
pumping gas - your job may feel meaningless, but it's not BS by any
means. Middle management tends to be the most BC. And many gov.
jobs."US employee now spends 45% of their working day doing their
real job. The other 55% is spent doing things such as wading
through endless emails or attending pointless meetings."This is
part of the job. Communicating is work, and we can't be 100%
efficient at all times.
 
VectorLock - 1 hours ago
This how I feel about most "Agile methods" going around like SCRUM.
 
  empath75 - 54 minutes ago
  Try doing it in government.
 
    logfromblammo - 49 minutes ago
    Which is to say iterated waterfall with stand-up meetings
    tacked on.
 
    sailfast - 34 minutes ago
    You're not doing it right :)I kid because I love, but I will
    say it depends on where you're attempting to do it, how much
    control you have over the process, whether you are a contractor
    or government employee, and how much your can convince your
    leadership of the good parts (these typically require actual
    risk-taking / change)
 
  sli - 1 hours ago
  I often see complaints about Agile and SCRUM met with, "You're
  just not using it correctly." In some circles, it's almost like a
  religion that you're not allowed to criticize. After all, it's
  The Process(TM), I guess.But from where I'm sitting, "correct"
  SCRUM looks like a whole lot of weird not-overhead-but-totally-
  overhead that seems difficult to manage across multiple projects.
  For example, what a "point" represents is constantly in
  flux.Instead, I actually prefer subsets of the methodology. When
  the company I work for was young, we all worked from home, and so
  daily standups were extremely effective at keeping us on task and
  productive while maintaining good balance (once you're done,
  you're done -- no creep). The board has been effective as
  organizing tasks and their progress.What would not have helped,
  or been in any way productive, would have been spending time
  trying to figure out how many "points" my tasks for the day are
  worth. I still don't see how that system is actually different
  from just using hours beyond philosophical arguments.Basically, I
  prefer a more focused and leaner version of the approaches.
 
    IronKettle - 11 minutes ago
    > I often see complaints about Agile and SCRUM met with,
    "You're just not using it correctly."To be fair, this is true a
    lot. Agile has quickly become "whatever you were doing before
    Agile but now with stand-ups and kanban boards."The real
    problem with Agile is that it's kinda stupid to assume that
    companies will radically change their development process and
    that they won't just do "whatever we were doing before but with
    a couple bits and pieces from this other thing."It's way easier
    to keep doing whatever you were doing before and just say that
    it's "Agile." See, for example, the number of teams that have
    long-winded standups even though that's pretty explicitly
    discouraged.> What would not have helped, or been in any way
    productive, would have been spending time trying to figure out
    how many "points" my tasks for the day are worth. I still don't
    see how that system is actually different from just using hours
    beyond philosophical arguments.Totally my take on the whole
    point system, but:They're definitely related (hours and
    points), but basically the whole idea is vagueness. Figuring
    out if something will take 3 hours or 5 hours is kinda
    meaningless, because you really have no idea until you get into
    it. Saying it's worth "5 story points" might suffice as a rough
    representation of that 3-7 hour chunk.If it ends up taking 20
    hours, oh well - good to know for next time!The idea is not to
    bicker over whether something will take 3 hours or 5 hours or 7
    hours, but to just slap a vague label on it as "low-to-moderate
    difficulty." It's supposed to save time in that regard.>
    Basically, I prefer a more focused and leaner version of the
    approaches.I think any reasonable Agile advocate would tell you
    to discover what's working for your team and what isn't, and to
    adjust accordingly.The point is mostly to move away from that
    extremely long-winded waterfall process and move towards rapid
    iteration. Story points and stand-ups are just tools for
    accomplishing that (by estimating velocity and having regular
    check-ins).
 
    jayd16 - 3 minutes ago
    Everyone has a different definition of "agile."  Its always
    going to be different and one of the key points of _agile_ is
    that you bend it to fit your own needs.That said, there are
    certainly pitfalls to taking some aspects of one methodology
    without understanding why those methods are the way they are
    and perhaps whether they rely on some other aspect of the
    methodology that is skimmed over.For example, story points.
    The reason they're made up is because people fixate on man-
    hours being a literal hour worth of work no matter the man.
    Instead you use a fuzzy point system that at first is
    impossible to use as a prediction but is supposed to become
    more accurate over time.  Everyone estimates points
    differently?  Fine.  that's why its points and not hours.  You
    make burn down charts and measure your velocity in points as
    well so as long as the point estimation doesn't fluctuate
    wildly you can start to get something.  Plus, it doesn't even
    matter if you can predict things.  Points are are also just an
    abstract concept to get people talking about task difficulty in
    general.  "300 points?!  Why do you say that?  What don't I
    understand about this task."  The main goal is to get relative
    values, not absolute hours.That said, a lot of these methods
    are taken as religion and used as a cudgel every two weeks.
 
    tytytytytytytyt - 32 minutes ago
    A lot of people don't do it correctly.  They identify 2 things
    that the company already does and then declare they are
    completely agile, having changed nothing about the way they do
    anything.
 
    User23 - 58 minutes ago
    "You're just not using it correctly" is absolutely correct, by
    definition, in all cases where "Agile" is imposed as some kind
    of top-down corporate policy.
 
      amorphid - 22 minutes ago
      A mentor once taught me that all actions taken by a company's
      people should be focused on making money, saving money, and
      saving time.  This is mostly a sniff test for "does this
      thing we're doing make sense in some obvious way."  When
      sniffing the value of any given team's Agile process, I
      usually find a notable lack of attempting to make money, save
      money, or save time.  Often I found people are very good at
      spending money, wasting time, and being completely detached
      from how they actions contribute to making money in a
      meaningful way.
 
arwhatever - 1 hours ago
It really exploded when George Carlin passed.
 
  tossaway1 - 8 minutes ago
  I thought he faded away... (?)
 
leepowers - 1 hours ago
> After the meeting, I found myself wondering why otherwise smart
people so easily slipped into this kind of business bullshit. How
had this obfuscatory way of speaking become so successful?Because
there's no solid link between inputs and outputs. For most
management techniques it's almost impossible to measure the output
of a given management function. It's unfalsifiable. Like any other
domain of human endeavor when operating in an unfalsifiable space
you can neither confirm nor debunk a particular technique. The only
thing you can do is _assert_ and flit from one fad to the next.The
paradox here is that while management seems to be required for
corporate structures to function properly so much of it is fluff or
outright BS. I have to wonder if a properly trained ML algorithm
could replace 90% of management decisions by cutting out the cruft
and ambiguity.
 
  bomb199 - 48 minutes ago
  If you want to get promoted, your managers need to approve of
  you. At the top, sometimes it's the CEO/Owner/Chairman needs to
  approve of you.Easiest way is to speak their language.
  Unfortunately their language is often gibberish. So now all these
  people in middle management have learned to speak gibberish so
  they can make more money and get closer to the real money at the
  top.
 
  jpk - 59 minutes ago
  > there's no solid link between inputs and outputs> a properly
  trained ML algorithm#ThinkingFaceEmoji
 
    wwweston - 53 minutes ago
    OK, maybe an improperly trained ML algorithm?
 
      AnimalMuppet - 20 minutes ago
      NOOP?It would be really efficient, too...
 
Crontab - 1 hours ago
They were making us do some Six Sigma training at work a few months
ago, and the entire time, it felt like nothing more than business
porn.
 
11thEarlOfMar - 1 hours ago
I particularly enjoy 'calling bullshit' on my fellow mush-speak
managers.Now, back to first principles.
 
touristtam - 1 hours ago
https://twitter.com/thekitze/status/945677952091639809
 
artellectual - 30 minutes ago
I see a pattern, based on this article and in my daily life. A lot
of these processes and ridiculous terminologies are usually created
by managers who have no real hard skill. Instead of doing any real
work this is what they come up with in order to validate
themselves. What does the delegator do when the work has all been
delegated? Nothing absolutely nothing and that?s where all these
ideas, terminologies mentioned in this article come from.IMO the
best managers are the people who have hard skills and leadership
skills as a combination. They are able to solve their own problems
and help other people solve their problems, and are able to ensure
everyone on their team comes out with a net positive on happiness.
 
borplk - 1 hours ago
I'm trivialising it a bit but at its core the bullshit speak and
the like gives hollow people a shield to hide behind.
 
sailfast - 27 minutes ago
I found this article to be of little utility. Some random history
about corporate management, crapping on an entire layer of the
organization, because they are called "management" (there are good
managers and they serve a purpose) and in the end not suggesting a
single thing to help improve the clarity of one's own language.All
to sell the author's book. Wish I had passed.
 
dawhizkid - 26 minutes ago
Management consulting has got to be the pinnacle of corporate
bullshit...some favorites of mine are "synergies, deliverables,
alignment, collaboration, circle back"Also this is fun:
http://www.atrixnet.com/bs-generator.html
 
  ucaetano - 15 minutes ago
  It only seems that way for those who don't understand it:-
  Synergy: savings due to economies of scale when joining
  organizations or due to vertical or horizontal integration-
  Deliverables: whatever product you agreed to deliver at the end
  of a project- Alignment: getting a bunch of higher ups to agree
  on something- Collaboration: duh- Circle back: when you're trying
  to get a lot of the higher ups to agree (sadly, through
  individual meetings), and one of them has big concerns, you have
  to relay that to the other higher-upsProgrammer phrasing all
  sounds like bs to someone who doesn't know it. "Let's do our
  daily scrum standup and get the scrum master and the product
  owner to agree on the architecture for the data storage module".
 
    sbov - 2 minutes ago
    Your example shows how widespread this problem is.  3 of your
    "programmer phrases" are actually management phrases, only
    applied to programming: daily scrum standup, scrum master,
    product owner.
 
strangeloops85 - 23 minutes ago
Ahem, 'moonshots' anyone?
 
user68858788 - 23 minutes ago
Does anyone have advice on how to resist this bullshit? Recently,
I've been moved away from software into an operations role where my
entire propose is to create bureaucracy and make numbers look good
for managers' managers. I lack experience and data for my voice to
be heard when I point out that we're obviously going backwards.
 
  Chaebixi - 7 minutes ago
  One thought that I have it to refuse to use any neologism that
  substitutes for an already-existing word or phrase.  The problem
  I have is that business BS has been going on for longer than I've
  been alive, so I don't have a good sense for old BS neologisms.
 
olivermarks - 1 hours ago
Another seasonal article variant from the FT (paywall)Embrace
failure and shoot for the moon ? tech clich?
bingohttps://www.ft.com/content/c6509e8e-
e6f5-11e7-8b99-0191e4537...
 
jacquesm - 20 minutes ago
My personal favorites: 'downsizing', 'to better serve you' and 'you
are important to us'.There's nothing new about this though, at bank
I worked for in the mid 80's (Chase Manhattan) there were plenty of
such business bullshit words. I wished I had thought of cataloging
them.