GOPHERSPACE.DE - P H O X Y
gophering on hngopher.com
HN Gopher Feed (2017-12-27) - page 1 of 10
 
___________________________________________________________________
My Internet Mea Culpa
37 points by pixelcort
https://shift.newco.co/my-internet-mea-culpa-f3ba77ac3eed
___________________________________________________________________
 
abusoufiyan - 1 hours ago
The Internet was how I really learned what people really thought
about others, and it wasn't a nice thing to realize but it was
necessary. My whole life I was suckered into this idea that people
will treat you fairly regardless of your skin color, your gender,
your ethnicity, the country you come from, etc. It was easy when no
one would say to your face that they judged you on these things. It
became difficult when you would go online and see just how many
people iterated these sentiments behind a veil of anonymity.We all
thought, like the author, that access to the Internet will put
people in connection who otherwise don't hear from each other, that
we will be exposed to new views, be more open-minded, etc. And the
opposite has happened. We forgot that the traditional barriers to
intercultural understanding are still there: language, tribal
sentiment, political and economic power structures, etc. At the end
of the day, in a democracy the majority can do anything it wants,
even if what it wants is to punish the minority. The Internet has
had all the failings of a total democracy in that sense.I also love
the point the author makes at the end. Silicon Valley loves to
think of itself as a bastion of rationality. But like every group
and every ideological movement and every person, it has a set of
core beliefs taken on faith and not on evidence. It's very possible
that the core beliefs and faith on which the Internet as a
radically open, radically free, nearly anarchic space was founded,
are...wrong...
 
  kbenson - 41 minutes ago
  > Silicon Valley loves to think of itself as a bastion of
  rationality. But like every group and every ideological movement
  and every person, it has a set of core beliefs taken on faith and
  not on evidence.The biggest problem I've found with people that
  purport to be rationalists (and I include myself) is the
  propensity to believe they have enough inputs to make definitive
  statements, when in truth they are just discounting the unknown
  unknowns.  When dealing with people, even on the individual level
  but it's much worse in groups, the complex motivations and
  constraints make every statement along the lines of "a rational
  person would do X" sound hopelessly naive.That some core beliefs
  are not examined or are believed to be the truth without evidence
  does not surprise me, even if it still makes me sad.
 
  neveroffensive - 1 hours ago
  > It's very possible that the core beliefs and faith on which the
  Internet as a radically open, radically free, nearly anarchic
  space was founded, are...wrong...I don't really understand this
  sentiment. If we admit that we all hold beliefs that could be
  wrong, isn't the ultimate conclusion radical freedom? The radical
  freedom of the internet isn't a result of a set of beliefs, it's
  the result of evicting belief and allowing all ideas to stand on
  their own merit.> We all thought, like the author, that access to
  the Internet will put people in connection who otherwise don't
  hear from each other, that we will be exposed to new views, be
  more open-minded, etc. And the opposite has happened.I think
  you're wrong here. The world is becoming an exponentially more
  peaceful and tolerant place in my experience. There is still a
  vocal minority which gets attention thanks to the open platform,
  but the overall result of this openness seems to be growing
  disdain for beliefs which we now know are founded in hate, not
  logic or science. Do you really feel that the world is in a worse
  place than it was in the 70's or even in 2010? In what ways?> It
  became difficult when you would go online and see just how many
  people iterated these sentiments behind a veil of
  anonymity.Genuine question, what percentage of 4chan do you
  believe is racist? Do you feel that racist memes genuinely come
  from a place of racism? What large anonymous groups do you
  believe consist of genuine racists? Do you consider me a racist
  if I make the statement, "more crime in America is committed by
  people with dark skin, relatively", even if I make no attempt to
  suggest a correlation or reason for this statistic?
 
darkr - 48 minutes ago
I enjoyed this article, particularly as someone who tried and
failed to complete Kevin Kelly?s ?The Inevitable? this year.If the
book had been written in 1996, it would have been cute.
Unfortunately it was written/released in 2016; the level of naivety
displayed was shocking. Page after page of techno-utopian stream-
of-consciousness futurist masterbation, without so much as a
fleeting thought given to social or political repercussions.As a
writer, he struck me as either a deeply cynical person, or as
someone with no understanding of humanity at all.
 
ep103 - 44 minutes ago
I think you could make an argument for the exact opposite.  No, we
have not reached the gifts my father or grandfather thought the
internet would bring to society.  For every hope that widespread
communication would bring understanding among the populace and
bring power to people instead of the elite, we now have a bot army
or fake news infrastructure working to oppose those ideals.But I
think these problems, and the problems the author points to, are
the result of the current, pre-internet world order attempting to
impose itself on the modern web, not the other way around.We've
already seen the massive effects of the internet on the populace
over the last 15 years or so, and I think a lot of those changes
have been both quiet, and genuinely good for people (How many
things are common knowledge now, that were never reported on the
news, as a quick example?).  What we're seeing now is the empire
strikes back, as established organizations attempt to impose
themselves back on this newly connected world before they go the
way of the music industry.  Whether this is done by manipulating
people online, walling off sections of the internet, flooding the
internet with propaganda/tracking/advertising, or simply removing
the open nature of the internet in entirety (Net Neutrality), the
drive appears to always be the same: large pre-internet
organizations imposing traditional order on a new medium.  And I
think it is these efforts that are responsible for the majority of
issues the author raises.Though that's not to say the internet
itself doesn't have a fair share of problems.  But even where the
internet seems at its worst, I think the problems still primarily
come from traditional societal organizations, and it is they, not
the internet, that should take the blame and be the focus of
change.  Let's take the surprisingly large influence of racism and
fascism that appears to exist online as an example, easily one of
the worst aspects of the internet.I think prevalence of hate speech
online exists for two major reasons.  The first and largest driving
force, is that the internet has revealed that outside of the
internet, there are essentially no actually truly-free, anonymous,
free speech places in a person's life.    Even online, the number
of places where one can state whatever they would like, to their
hearts content, without having those thoughts potentially affect
their daily life, are extremely rare and need to be sought out.  Is
it any surprise, then, that the people who seek out such forums are
often those who are upset at the end of the day, and feel a need to
spit some vitriol?  Or that the users of such forums specifically
focus saying things they know they could not say in any other
aspect of their life?I fail to see this as a shortcoming of the
internet, and see it more as an indictment of society at large.
Perhaps if there were more places where one can truly speak out at
the end of a day, and be heard but not judged or discriminated
against, less people would be willing to rage alone against an
empty screen.  But even if you reject this idea, then the
alternative to me seems worse.   Because the alternative is that we
have to accept that the average person is not capable, or should
not be allowed, to navigate accountability-free communication, and
society will need to be built accordingly going forward.  Hopefully
I don't need to point out the obvious downside to embracing such a
philosophy.That said, I think we did make, and are making one major
design mistake, consistently online.  And that is that we need to
recognize that the way human society works, is that new ideas are
shouted by individuals all the time, and then the silent masses
judge them, mostly silently, and embrace them slowly into their day
to day.  On a webpage design level, this needs to be taken into
account.  If you are listing all comments on your webpage with
equal weight, then we need to accept that you're going to get a
pretty consistent distribution of comments ranging from insightful
to hateful, and from thought-provoking to headache inducing.  But
if you allow the masses to weigh in, for example, by voting on
comments, you'll find that most of the nauseating hate-filled ideas
quickly fall off the radar, just like they do in real life.  This
is the difference between say, youtube comments and reddit
comments.  I would love to see websites start taking this a step
further, and automatically start banning any users who are
consistently voted beneath a certain threshold, just how in real
life, everyone ignores the crazy guy on the sidewalk corner after
his first diatribe is found to be crazy.
 
malvosenior - 1 hours ago
I don?t think this author speaks for a lot of people in tech. His
viewpoint seems to be from a very narrow subculture, mainly Web 2.0
era social networking.Some of us have had a lifelong passion for
technology and are actually happy and excited about the current
state of the industry (and always have been).If you don?t like
people disagreeing with you on Twitter, just turn it off. Don?t
claim that it?s part of some apparatus (that the author feels he
helped invent) that somehow brought out the worst in humanity. He
should feel happy he can now get exposed to views outside of his
bubble.
 
  mr_spothawk - 37 minutes ago
  > (that the author feels he helped invent)agreed... article felt
  like maximum ego-stroking, minimal thinking.to my mind, the
  conversation about where "the web" went off the rails ends with
  the dopamine-hook. I worked with a team building game experiences
  5 years ago, it was all we could think about. good examples of it
  were everything we wanted to emulate. it was disgusting...mea
  culpa.for the children growing up today, whose parents put their
  baby photos on blast all day... there will be a reckoning.i
  wonder what that will look like.
 
  dgreensp - 30 minutes ago
  It's not Web 2.0-era social networking, it's a kind of tech
  utopianism that's been around for decades.  I agree that the
  article doesn't make a lot of sense if you never believed that
  the Internet was going to automatically bring about (or be) a
  utopia.  It's also reasonable to argue that the Internet, for all
  its flaws, succeeds at being an agent of social progress.
 
  QAPereo - 1 hours ago
  Are you really arguing that social media isn?t optimized to
  create bubbles?
 
    [deleted]
 
    notacoward - 45 minutes ago
    Social media are optimized for maximum engagement. If people
    engage more in bubbles, they'll get bubbles. If people engage
    more by reaching out and exploring beyond their bubbles, the
    platforms will facilitate that instead. Don't blame the mirror.
 
      QAPereo - 26 minutes ago
      I blame the algorithm behind the mirror, and the people
      behind the algorithms.