GOPHERSPACE.DE - P H O X Y
gophering on hngopher.com
HN Gopher Feed (2017-12-27) - page 1 of 10
 
___________________________________________________________________
Big Tech Is Going After Health Care
49 points by SREinSF
https://www.nytimes.com/2017/12/26/technology/big-tech-health-ca...
___________________________________________________________________
 
hacker_9 - 50 minutes ago
This article is pretty devoid of content, and really only mentions
that the Apple watch can be used as a constant heart monitor. Big
deal, you aren't going to get much information from measuring just
your heart beat and knowing next to nothing else of whats going on
in the rest of your body too.The real technological breakthrough
will come when we have the ability to measure in real time what is
going on in our various organs, such as enzyme production and
transportation of molecules, but that's a long way out yet.
 
blhack - 48 minutes ago
Good.I spent a few years working in a medical IoT startup, and the
current state of the "mainstream" medical monitoring technology is
not inspiring.During a brainstorming meeting, I asked one of our
cofounders, a physician, to tell me about some of the problems he
had seen in health.  Don't try and solve it, just lets talk about
problems.He said that by far one of the most common causes for re-
hospitalization is congestive heart failure.  It's a super common
problem, and it's actually really easy to catch (it has strong
indicators).  When your heart begins to fail, depending on what
side of it fails, your body will retain fluid (in the form of
blood) in either your heart or your organs.  Regardless, you will
bloat up, and gain weight quickly.So if a patient is at risk for
CHF, a nurse will monitor their weight every day (or multiple times
a day) and watch for spikes.  If their weight spikes, a doctor will
intervene in whatever way is necessary.Can you imagine my
frustration at hearing this?  It's this massive problem with an
obvious (CHEAP!! SO FUCKING CHEAP!!) solution.I spend $30 on a
scale from amazon immediately, and about an hour after it arrived I
had it connected to an android tablet and broadcasting its readings
to a webservice.We never went to market with that (long story).
Please, if you have the means to take something like that and scale
it, do so.  You could save lives.  I'm currently trying.  More
people should be trying.  This stuff is so easy, and the impact
that you could have is massive.Also: please call your grandparents
and just talk to them.  Ask them how they are feeling.
 
  hacker_9 - 30 minutes ago
  The monitoring devices are the real problem, not the people. Do
  you think all weight spikes simply equate to having CHF? You
  can't just rely on such a basic measurement when dealing with an
  incredibly complex system such as the human body. A lot more
  specialist equipment is going to be needed to come to a final
  conclusion (Questioning from experts, MRIs, XRays, even
  Microsurgery with cameras).What consumers can currently access
  are weighing scales, and heartbeat monitors. Maybe even
  temperature monitors. Do you think this stuff is useful for
  diagnosing medical conditions? There is a whole lot going on
  under the surface that we simply can't see at all, that's the
  real problem.
 
    rhombocombus - 15 minutes ago
    It is possible that some of the noise (non-medically relevant
    changes) could be filtered algorithmically, and conversely
    conditions might be able to be picked up that might not be
    noticed by a normal provider. Physicians use those tools to
    diagnose disease all the time, that's why there is a
    thermometer, scale, and stethoscope in every doctor's office in
    the world, I don't understand how these tools aren't useful.
 
    killjoywashere - 5 minutes ago
    Your comment is a great example of the disconnect between
    hackers and doctors. Do you actually think anyone in this space
    would believe that weight spikes are tied to CHF in all cases?
    You don't diagnose CHF by weight. It's something you trend in
    known patients.Comments like this are one reason why doctors
    give zero shits about the potential of computing. Explaining
    even the basics of a narrow area of human physiology to some
    overly arrogant IT guy is maddening. Yes, the doctors can be
    blamed for conflating computer scientists with the IT guy who
    came to replace their mouse. But the IT guy and the CS guy
    (always a guy) can both equally be blamed for their unholy
    arrogance. How many lives did you save today? Zero? Ok, STFU.
    At least I didn't spill any data (that I know of).This can go
    round, and round, and round.You have no idea how far down the
    problem goes. I know this because no one knows how far the
    problem goes. We sequence hundreds of thousands if not millions
    of genomes, and still we don't know. Do you really think we
    spend a decade in training and come out thinking everything is
    simple?!Now, on the flip side, doctors also don't even know how
    to frame their problems, in no small part because they're only
    required to take 2 semesters of calculus. And then most of them
    punch out of math as fast as possible.Computer scientists
    should be going to biology conferences. Go to ASCO. Pick a
    medical specialty, they have multiple conferences a year, I
    garauntee it. There's one or 10 in your city. If you want
    middle ground, look at microbiology, immunology, molecular
    biology. They use a fair number of quantitative methods
    (sequencing, mass spec, flow cytometry, etc).
 
mjfl - 43 minutes ago
Yeah, nothing's going to happen. Compliance costs are too high for
any of Silicon Valley's business models to work.
 
  adventured - 27 minutes ago
  The way you fix the existing system, is by not trying to change
  it. You replace it instead. You build new, lighter, more nimble
  approaches to old problems, rather than trying to convince
  existing power structures to change. That's where any gains will
  come from by big tech entering the fray, if there end up being
  any.Trying to change something like the hyper regulated, hyper
  stagnant, special-interest dominated US healthcare system, is a
  folly of an idea. You kill it instead by routing around it with
  new solutions wherever possible.Simple example: the rapidly
  growing market for direct primary care subscription services [1].
  Pair that up with guaranteed catastrophic coverage for all by the
  US Govt or state governments, and the US healthcare system as we
  know it is dead due to a simple route around that would
  dramatically lower costs. It's far easier to implode a failed
  bureacracy by replacing it in that manner, than by trying to
  change the existing bureacracy. You see that in everything from
  old media (which held a cartel stranglehold on broadcast access,
  the Internet routed around them), to the taxi medallion cartels
  (which Uber & Lyft murdered by routing around them instead of
  trying to convince them to change).[1]
  http://www.businessinsider.com/direct-primary-care-a-no-insu...
 
    snomad - moments ago
    As the MOOCs found out, you can't just "replace" certain
    societal services - especially those beset with volumes of
    regulation and numerous groups of powerful stakeholders happy
    to reach out to politicians and the public (AARP, Insurance,
    numerous govt entities, drs groups, nurses groups).2/3 of
    healthcare is paper pushing, the easiest thing the tech
    community can automate is boring old CRUD paper pushing. I hope
    one day we as consumers have the chance to get a USB stick to
    store and retain our own medical records. Walk into dr's office
    / hospital, hand over device, boom their is your whole history
    including previous surgeries, allergies, etc. Whatever is done
    gets imprinted on device, walk out with an updated history.
    That is some seriously productive low-hanging fruit.
 
oh-kumudo - 43 minutes ago
If there is one industry that needs to be disrupted, that is US's
health care industry, it is too expensive.
 
  epmaybe - 10 minutes ago
  I don't think tech disruption is necessary to reduce costs, a
  multidisciplinary approach could do something similar.
 
ynonym00s - 1 hours ago
Would love to get some insight into the work at Verily or DeepMind
Health for a software developer interested in working in
healthcare.
 
dawhizkid - 31 minutes ago
As someone who most recently worked in product at a healthcare
startup I found the most difficult thing about innovation in the
space is the cost of compliance/regulation.When you work in an
industry that is so highly regulated, and assuming you are working
at a company that follows the rule of law, how do you actually
"disrupt" a set of problems in this industry when there is so
little wiggle room for doing things differently? Following legal
guidelines in healthcare means reenforcing bad norms rather than
disrupting them.One of the biggest WTF moments I had when I first
started was realizing that fax communication is HIPAA-compliant
whereas email/SMS are not, even though in theory anyone could walk
by a fax machine at any time and take medically sensitive
information sent over.
 
  newman8r - 23 minutes ago
  I'm pretty sure email can be HIPAA compliant as long as you
  implement the system using the established guidelines.
 
mtgx - 1 hours ago
And it's going to throw your medical privacy out of the window in
the process.I suppose we'll also see some major deregulation
similar to the net neutrality repeal in the healthcare industry
before long.
 
  rossdavidh - 49 minutes ago
  Maybe, but in this case there's an entrenched interest (health
  care companies) that might want to use medical privacy as a way
  to keep themselves from being Uber-ized.
 
zitterbewegung - 1 hours ago
They are going after health care because they either ran out of
customers or people to advertise to.Hopefully they can make some
progress but so far I don't see much.