GOPHERSPACE.DE - P H O X Y
gophering on hngopher.com
HN Gopher Feed (2017-12-18) - page 1 of 10
 
___________________________________________________________________
Mining Bitcoin with pencil and paper: 0.67 hashes per day (2014)
531 points by dvt
http://www.righto.com/2014/09/mining-bitcoin-with-pencil-and-pap...
l-and-paper.html
___________________________________________________________________
 
j_s - 10 hours ago
Bitcoin Paper Wallets (2015) |
https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=15302500
 
molx - 1 hours ago
Weird. I was just re-reading this post the other day when I found
it in an old bookmarks..
 
hathym - 9 hours ago
you will earn 0.000000000002$ a day according to cryptocompare
[1][1]
https://www.cryptocompare.com/mining/calculator/btc?HashingP...
 
  pishpash - 9 hours ago
  That's still 25333000 old Zimbabwe dollars, man.
 
viach - 8 hours ago
I think you could even mine Bitcoin with Turing-complete cellular
automata simulated by a crowd of trained dogs, receiving movement
orders by a small internet-of-things bluetooth radio (powered by
IOTA?), implanted into their brains.For what it worth...
 
  make3 - 5 hours ago
  video please
 
tboyd47 - 8 hours ago
Cool. I wonder if anyone has tried to do the transaction signing
procedure manually.
 
ddorian43 - 12 hours ago
Next: Mining bitcoin with pool of monkeys with typewriters.
 
  yitchelle - 11 hours ago
  "The next question is the energy cost. A cheap source of food
  energy is donuts at $0.23 for 200 kcalories."We will need a
  BTC/Donut exchange soon.
 
    TomMarius - 11 hours ago
    Donut futures!
 
      sorokod - 5 hours ago
      Doughnuts?
 
  pmorici - 8 hours ago
  Human body heat mining, very Matrix
  esqhttps://thenextweb.com/cryptocurrency/2017/12/12/startup-
  use...
 
  [deleted]
 
  TeMPOraL - 12 hours ago
  Monkeys with typewriters are currently busy banging out
  whitepapers for ICOs.
 
    matthewrudy - 12 hours ago
    A friend of mine writes and edits ICO whitepapers. He's very
    skilled and gets paid pretty well for those skills.
 
      TeMPOraL - 11 hours ago
      The fact alone that writing and editing ICO whitepapers
      (plural) is something an individual can do as a job makes me
      trust ICOs significantly less.
 
        philfrasty - 11 hours ago
        You have seen nothing yet
        https://www.fiverr.com/writer_clara/write-and-proofread-
        your...
 
          TeMPOraL - 11 hours ago
          Oh God.Given the quality of this gig description, at
          least we know that whitepapers written by that person
          will be immediately recognizable as scams.
 
          ckastner - 10 hours ago
          And yet, people will still invest in it.The "Useless
          Ethereum Token" [1] subtitles itself as so:You're going
          to give some random person on the internet money, and
          they're going to take it and go buy stuff with it.
          Probably electronics, to be honest. Maybe even a big-
          screen television.Seriously, don't buy these tokens.And
          people still invested more than $40.000 in it [2].[1]
          https://uetoken.com/[2] https://qz.com/1023501/ethereum-
          ico-people-invested-thousand...
 
          TeMPOraL - 8 hours ago
          Bad example. That's one ICO I would actually buy into
          myself if I discovered it in time. I'm a believer in
          timely executed jokes, much like many other people on the
          Internet.
 
          notahacker - 9 hours ago
          What's particularly alarming about that is he appears to
          have had at least three people purchase his service, two
          of them after the first had commented that it was
          substandard...You know a market's full of suckers when
          even the wannabe scammers aren't discerning enough to
          avoid being ripped off.
 
        SilasX - 1 hours ago
        How is that any more objectionable than the existence of
        professional grant request writers?
 
        user5994461 - 10 hours ago
        Lawyers charge exorbitant amounts for writing contracts.
        Selling papers is not a new invention.
 
          TeMPOraL - 8 hours ago
          A whitepaper is not a contract. It's a description of
          "what does this do and why should you care", i.e.
          literally the thing you're buying into in an ICO.
 
        mv4 - 1 hours ago
        Over last couple of weeks, I received a dozen or so contact
        requests on LinkedIn from "Blockchain and ICO experts".
        They don't have any other verifiable jobs on their resumes.
 
        mseebach - 10 hours ago
        Smart money has always been on selling shovels to the gold
        diggers.
 
          [deleted]
 
          FatalBaboon - 9 hours ago
          On the bright side, maybe the cryptoworld is merely
          investing on better GPUs by metric-tons of cash.
 
      eertami - 8 hours ago
      Sure it takes skill to be a scam artist, but that doesn't
      mean such behavior should be tolerated.
 
      dalbasal - 10 hours ago
      No one is denying skills, just measuring skills on a ?how
      many monkeys? scale.
 
      tromp - 10 hours ago
      If he wrote
      http://mimblewimble.cash/20160719-OriginalWhitePaper.txt, I'd
      like to meet him!
 
    godzillabrennus - 12 hours ago
    I think Narwals are the ones responsible for the IOTA white
    paper.
 
    thinkMOAR - 12 hours ago
    This made me laugh louder then i should i guess :D
 
    progx - 11 hours ago
    i thought they write the next Hollywood-Blockbuster?
 
      3chelon - 10 hours ago
      No, they're way too good for _that_.
 
  saalweachter - 2 hours ago
  The actual hash computation should be mechanical.  It's a
  straight algorithm.The part you want to optimize is the selection
  of the random noise you need to make the hash come out with the
  appropriate number of zeros.  You ask your test subjects (monkey,
  human, slime mold, whatever) to provide the noise, you test it
  with your mechanical hasher, and then either reward or punish
  them based on the number zeros in the hash.
 
lainon - 12 hours ago
https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=8380110
 
vinceguidry - 6 hours ago
> It's clear I'm not going to make my fortune off manual mining,
and I haven't even included the cost of all the paper and pencils
I'll need.He's not taking into account price inflation over the
long term. If BTC ever cracks a million USD, he'll really regret
not squeezing every last bit of hashrate he can now.
 
  riazrizvi - 4 hours ago
  Hmm. If you can mine 15 trillion hashes per second you are likely
  to find one bitcoin after 486 days (derived from numbers on this
  site www.cryptocompare.com). The human rate of hashing is .67
  hashes per day. Based on a price of $1 million for one bitcoin,
  that would translate to a break even salary of one million-
  billionth of a penny per hour. Probably be hard to find good
  people at that rate.
 
    coralreef - 42 minutes ago
    China might be a good place to setup shop?
 
  ritinkar - 4 hours ago
  If BTC cracks 1 million won't that mean there's 2.1 trillion
  dollars worth of USD BTC in circulation in addition to all the
  other currencies?
 
    jjeaff - 3 hours ago
    Only in the most theoretical sense. Since there is no
    underlying asset, you are going to run out of buyers real fast
    at that amount.
 
      vinceguidry - 3 hours ago
      If the market can't clear, the price will drop until it does.
      Saying bitcoin has reached a certain price carries with it
      the implication that the market is clearing at the price,
      i.e. that people are indeed buying.Million-USD transactions
      already occur in BTC all the time.
 
        __alias - moments ago
        There's a VR webapp that was shared recently that shows
        live btc transactions. Just thought i'd share that for the
        10 minutes I watched it the other day I saw numerous 10M+
        transactions
 
      usrusr - 1 hours ago
      You only run out of buyers if there are sellers.
 
    tomerico - 4 hours ago
    21 trillions, or about 3 times the value of all gold mined in
    the world.
 
      vinceguidry - 3 hours ago
      And around the market size of the S&P 500.
 
    m3kw9 - 3 hours ago
    If bitcoin price is derived from the bid ask, most of the
    worlds money would have to be parked in bitcoin, does that even
    make sense?
 
      jjeaff - 3 hours ago
      "parked"? No, since no real money or asset is held to back up
      bitcoin.  It could go to $100 million tomorrow based on a few
      transactions, but that wouldn't be indicative of what anyone
      else will be able to get for it.
 
        celticninja - 1 hours ago
        Now that is just wrong. If the price went to $100m tomorrow
        it is because people are buying and selling bitcoin for
        that price.
 
      vinceguidry - 3 hours ago
      Money supplies are constantly inflating, every financial
      instrument can be looked at as a form of money, and quite a
      few of them are actually considered to be money, such as
      treasuries and traveler's cheques. According to Wikipedia,
      the broadest measure of money supply currently in use was
      10.5 trillion, in 2013.That cryptocurrencies are not
      currently considered to be money by the world economic order,
      it goes into a much broader range of financial assets like
      stocks and bonds. The S&P 500 market size reached 19.6
      trillion USD in 2016Bitcoin has a lot of room to grow before
      it even comes close to playing in that league. Everybody on
      HN should be buying crypto right now, the upside is that
      huge.
 
      john_moscow - 3 hours ago
      Except it isn't parked in any way. The money goes from the
      hands of the optimistic buyers into the hands of those who
      decided to cash out just now. The only asset "backing"
      Bitcoin is the people willing to buy it.
 
  Dylan16807 - 2 hours ago
  Remember, a hash that takes much longer than 10 minutes is worth
  absolutely nothing.  You don't get a coin, and you can't
  participate in a pool.
 
  beardog - 1 hours ago
  It would be way more effective to work a minimum wage job and buy
  some Bitcoin with that money.
 
bogomipz - 7 hours ago
>"Currently, a successful hash must start with approximately 17
zeros, so only one out of 1.4 x 10^20 hashes will be
successful."Can someone elaborate on the math here? How do we get
to 1 in 1.4 x 10^20 ?
 
  carry_bit - 6 hours ago
  It's probably 17 hexadecimal zeros.
 
  nerdlogic - 6 hours ago
  Assuming  uniformly random hashes, shouldn't it be 1/2^17?
 
scotty79 - 10 hours ago
You could squeeze much more bitcoin out of yourself if you powered
asic miner with a bicycle but I can appreciate low capital costs of
pencil method.
 
  jjxw - 5 hours ago
  Capital costs may not be trivial if you factor in food required
  for brainpower.
 
    amdavidson - 4 hours ago
    That's not capital in the sense of durable assets to be
    depreciated. That's an operational expense.
 
    schiffern - 4 hours ago
    That's an operational cost, not a capital cost. ;)Comparing
    capital cost between the two is also fun. Creating a literate
    person who can perform arithmetic certainly requires more
    resources than creating a person who can "merely" pedal a
    bicycle. There's a lot of embodied energy in a person's
    education, and the cost reflects that.
 
      em3rgent0rdr - 4 hours ago
      Also might want to consider what is the opportunity cost of
      what else a literate person could do instead of mining.
 
  pishpash - 9 hours ago
  Always faster with an abacus.
 
  flamedoge - 5 hours ago
  using brain is way more cost efficient
 
    em3rgent0rdr - 4 hours ago
    (note: the conclusion of the paper actually performs a similar
    calculation)The brain uses ~300 kCal per day (roughly %20 of a
    human's resting metabolic rate of 1300 kCal per day)  = 0.35
    kWattHours per day = about 4.2 cents per day (assuming brain
    can be powered at average market rate of energy of 12
    cents/hWattHours) = about 6.3 cents per hash (at .67
    hashes/day) = about 12 sextillion days to mine one block (at
    current difficulty of 1,873,105,475,221) = about half a
    septillion dollars to mine one block.Of course might make more
    sense to use the full 1300 kCal, considering that a human
    calculator still needs to use hands for pencil manipulation and
    provide power to rest of organs to stay alive.  Point being
    this is not efficient or profitable at current
    difficulty.However, assuming a pre-computer world or post-
    apocalyptic world without computing machines, then difficulty
    will be adjusted to be much easier such that it conceivably
    would be profitable (maybe with a slave army of human
    computers).  Transactions and blocks could easily be sent via
    carrier pigeon.
 
nblavoie - 10 hours ago
I find the article's video so interesting and easy to understand
for a non-mining/technical background. I almost want to start doing
it just for the sake of it (like a sudoku or mental exercice).
 
_pmf_ - 11 hours ago
I think there is a market for selling hand-mined bitcoins as a
novelty item, but selling individual hashes might be a pretty small
niche.
 
  Erlich_Bachman - 10 hours ago
  To be able to mine at all (with whatever speed), you need to be
  able to complete an individual hash operation in less than 10
  minutes - before the next Bitcoin block is created elsewhere on
  the network - because you have to base your calculation on that
  previous block's hash. If it takes more than a day to compute one
  hash, it does not work, no matter how many of them you could
  theoretically do in parallel.
 
    esnard - 9 hours ago
    10 minutes is the average time between the creation of the two
    blocks, so the time could be much greater.Block 74638 was mined
    almost 7 hours after the previous one, for example, because of
    a serious overflowing issue.Of course, the combinaison of "no
    block created in 36 hours" & "the hand-calculated block is
    valid" is highly unlikely, but still possible.
 
      Shank - 6 hours ago
      The network adjusted difficulty aims to average 10 minutes
      between blocks at all times. In order to get a point where
      you could feasibly calculate a hash you would have to have an
      extraordinary breakdown of something (like all of the
      hashpower vanishing) in order to get enough time before the
      next block.
 
  tim333 - 11 hours ago
  It takes a lot of billions of hashes per bitcoin - I think your
  hand mined one would work out a bit too expensive for anyone to
  buy.
 
    Shoothe - 10 hours ago
    Not to mention that Bitcoins are indistinguishable from
    themselves. So that'd be a very niche idea.
 
      stctgion - 10 hours ago
      You'd need a new coin. Perhaps some form of proof of work
      that could only be done by hand
 
        david-cako - 10 hours ago
        Nike sneakers :^)
 
      LyndsySimon - 8 hours ago
      That's not entirely true - individual addresses and/or
      transactions can be seen as "tainted", and those coins can be
      tracked through the Blockchain.I've been a Bitcoin proponent
      for a long time, but this lack of basic fungibility is one of
      its major downsides in my opinion.
 
        Shoothe - 3 hours ago
        > individual addresses and/or transactions can be seen as
        "tainted", and those coins can be tracked through the
        Blockchain.I'd say it's rather tainting transactions that
        use outputs of your "tainted" transaction. Personally I
        don't like bringing "coins" into discussion because people
        think it's something more material than it really is while
        in fact "coins" are just numbers in transaction outputs.If
        you have transaction that sends 2 BTC to an address you
        can't taint 1 BTC out of it because in this scenario they
        are just numbers, like you can't distinguish both 1s in 1 +
        1 = 2.That you can track transactions back to their mining
        block is another matter.
 
logicallee - 3 hours ago
these "broke founder" war stories are getting out of hand...
 
fvdessen - 10 hours ago
I've found it works best with artisanal sharpened pencils
http://www.artisanalpencilsharpening.com
 
  dvfjsdhgfv - 10 hours ago
  Well, the Paypal button actually works! I wonder if someone ever
  placed an order though...
 
    fvdessen - 10 hours ago
    IIRC it was a successful business at some point ...
 
    croon - 9 hours ago
    There was a much lower price point originally, before he got
    sort of famous from the book, and subsequently a TV-show (Going
    Deep). The current price is basically to keep people from
    ordering, but still having it open if someone REALLY wants to
    get one.
 
      jdironman - 9 hours ago
      Honestly, what is getting me is that his book on sharpening
      pencils is actually 224 pages long. That seems awful long on
      such a simple subject!
 
        croon - 9 hours ago
        And yet he made a half hour show with episodes such as "how
        to bounce a ball", "how to dig a hole, "how to open a
        door", "how to take a nap", etc.
 
          jdironman - 9 hours ago
          Sounds like he must be a good talker to say the least.
          Charismatic or at the minimum entertaining.
 
          croon - 9 hours ago
          It's definitely majority charisma and being funny, but a
          portion of the show is talking to experts in the relevant
          fields to discuss underlying aspects of each "simple
          concept" that one doesn't normally contemplate.
 
          bschwindHN - 8 hours ago
          It's mostly satire, but of the best variety. He spoke at
          my university a few years ago, he definitely knows how to
          entertain a
          crowd.https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KabOfnbS4TQ
 
          mamon - 6 hours ago
          Or, my personal favourite:https://www.goodreads.com/book/
          show/77377.How_to_Shit_in_the...
 
          InitialLastName - 4 hours ago
          That book is surprisingly nuanced, full of good advice
          like:- The best paired squatting methods, for when
          there's no good tree available (takes a lot of trust).-
          Advice to look below you before using a cliff.
 
          daniel-cussen - 8 hours ago
          Cort?zar wrote some stories like "how to climb stairs."
 
        astura - 7 hours ago
        There's only a few sentences on each page.
 
        logfromblammo - 7 hours ago
        I guess the joke is that sharpening pencils is what you do
        when you have writer's block, so if you really have
        writer's block, you write a whole book on sharpening
        pencils?
 
      IncRnd - 9 hours ago
      Wait!  The price is meant to STOP people from ordering?  I
      naturally assumed after watching the video of his artisanal
      pencil sharpening techniques that the prices implied
      exclusivity and a cut above the rest.I ran out to the dollar
      store lickety-split, purchased five dozen pencils, and put in
      orders for all 60 of them.  Sure, it was a cool 30k, but you
      need your pencils sharpened properly for your entire family,
      maids, and baby-sitters.He really should update his order
      cart for people who want to get a dozen or more sharpened at
      a time.I would have ordered a full gross, but I had to run
      off and purchase a book for my second cousin's youngest son's
      friend who has a book report due.  https://www.amazon.com
      /Trends-European-Television-Communicat...
 
    Matt3o12_ - 8 hours ago
    You can get the book for much less on amazon[1] though for a
    reasonable price (including a look inside). There is even a
    direct link to Amazon on his website.[1]:
    https://www.amazon.com/How-Sharpen-Pencils-Theoretical-Contr...
 
      osteele - 2 hours ago
      The price on the web site is for the pencil, not the book.
 
  rb808 - 8 hours ago
  Lol. From the newyorker article ?I?m sure there?s somebody in
  India who could sharpen your pencil for $8, but if you want
  authentic American craftsmanship ? that?s how much quality costs
  these days.?  https://www.newyorker.com/books/page-turner
  /pencils-and-noth...
 
  jlewallen - 2 hours ago
  Or just DIY with this:http://www.leevalley.com/us/wood/page.aspx?
  cat=1,42936,42452...
 
    zeep - 1 hours ago
    this is my favorite pencil sharpener because it has so many
    other uses and the blade is easy to change:
    https://www.amazon.com/Stanley-10-499-Change-Retractable-Uti...
 
  TimTheTinker - 4 hours ago
  $500/pencil? Sounds similar to recent online money laundering
  schemes.
 
    sah2ed - 3 hours ago
    Nope. That link has been posted around here since about 7 years
    ago![0] https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=2453713
 
andrewfromx - 5 hours ago
this is great. for your next trick can you do a few transactions in
the tangle iota by hand too?
 
juanmirocks - 5 hours ago
This is one of the most really hackerish thing I've seen. Bravo.
Thank you for submitting.
 
[deleted]
 
coding123 - 11 minutes ago
I think this solves our problem: Ban hardware/software based
mining. Reduce the number of 0's we're looking for.  UBI is born.
 
toblender - 7 hours ago
Articles like this remind me how little I know about bitcoin.I just
recently learnt how difficulty works, so something like this is
perfect for understanding the hashing part of the protocol.
 
remcob - 11 hours ago
Around when this was published I looked into the feasibility of
pencil-and-paper wallets. What would it take to generate a key-pair
using just pencil and paper?There are tricks like big tables of
precomputed multiples of the generator that make it easier, but you
still need to do hundreds of 77 digit modular multiplications. And
you want to be absolutely sure you made no mistake.
 
  Shoothe - 10 hours ago
  Well secp256k1 private keys are just 32 random bytes (with some
  minor exceptions) so I think you could arrange something with a
  plain dice and a little bit of time.
 
    remcob - 7 hours ago
    Generating the private key is the easy part; Just 77 rolls with
    a ten-sided die and re-try if it exceeds the prime. Or 256 coin
    flips, if you prefer binary.It is computing the public key that
    is so hard.
 
      Shoothe - 3 hours ago
      For practical purposes I'd recommend an offline laptop, maybe
      running Tails OS and Electrum [0]. Public key is one thing
      and making transactions and signatures quite another.[0]: htt
      ps://tails.boum.org/doc/anonymous_internet/electrum/index...
 
    EmielMols - 10 hours ago
    Of course, but it would be cool if you could also calculate the
    public component on paper (and ideally verify it computerless
    as well). You could really create your bitcoin/ether/etc wallet
    with the public key only, whilst having an extremely low attack
    surface (private key never touches computer memory).
 
      Shoothe - 3 hours ago
      But remember the caveats about using the same key pair for
      multiple transactions:
      https://en.bitcoin.it/wiki/Address_reuse
 
      lotyrin - 3 hours ago
      I wonder if a slightly more feasible solution of producing
      and verifying a solution out of simple TTL, so there's no
      "computer" just a application specific machine made of simple
      commodity parts which one could trust reasonably easily would
      be actually worth something.
 
  naveen99 - 8 hours ago
  may as well create and sign the transaction on paper also.
 
    remcob - 7 hours ago
    For signing, both your private key and a random number k need
    to be kept secret. The process then involves scalar
    multiplication, modular inversion and two more multiplications
    ? strictly more work than generating a key-pair.
 
  discordianfish - 7 hours ago
  A mechanical wallet would be awesome!
 
    Florin_Andrei - 3 hours ago
    Now I want to read a steampunk sci-fi novel where
    cryptocurrency is mined on steam-powered devices. Of course,
    the algorithms should match the capabilities of the underlying
    hardware.
 
  ribasushi - 7 hours ago
  It is theoretically possible, as there are just a few moving
  parts ( 2 tweets worth ):
  https://twitter.com/ribasushi/status/939954274569785344Whether it
  is feasible... the amount of calculations around secp256k1 is
  likely practically prohibitive for pencil/paper.
 
drewmol - 2 hours ago
If anyone is a math teacher of the appropriate age group, "manually
calculate 2 hashes" seems like a good punishment as an alterntive
to the old "write x statement y times"
 
[deleted]