GOPHERSPACE.DE - P H O X Y
gophering on hngopher.com
HN Gopher Feed (2017-12-14) - page 1 of 10
 
___________________________________________________________________
How the US Pushed Sweden to Take Down the Pirate Bay
383 points by pawal
https://torrentfreak.com/how-the-us-pushed-sweden-to-take-down-t...
___________________________________________________________________
 
Feniks - 2 hours ago
Still up though. I use it every once in a while because its on TOR.
My ISP has to block some pirate sites now.I'm from the generation
that grew up with digital piracy. I am accustomed to have all media
available. From nineties anime shows to strategy guides for
videogames.
 
jakobegger - 5 hours ago
And despite all these efforts, I'm still a happy user of the pirate
bay whenever I want to watch something that I can't find on iTunes
or Amazon. For me, the Pirate Bay has been the most reliable way to
find stuff over the last years, for so many things it's still
better than all the paid alternatives that I use.So much money
wasted on futile attempts to suppress a website...
 
  dom96 - 4 hours ago
  Does anyone have any insight on how TPB has managed to stay
  online this long?
 
    Cthulhu_ - 4 hours ago
    IIRC it was sold / transferred to an unknown party and hosted
    outside of any jurisdictions. The mistake the original owners
    made was that their names could be traced back from the
    website.
 
      aurbano - 3 hours ago
      > hosted outside of any jurisdictionsI'm curious about this -
      does it mean hosting in a country that "doesn't care", or is
      there some other option that I'm unaware of?
 
        Feniks - 2 hours ago
        There are shady hosting companies who don't ask a lot of
        questions. Some of them even accept BTC. At the end of the
        day TPB is just ones and zeros in a basement somewhere.
 
  johndoe90 - 5 hours ago
  I hope TPB will teach copyright owners a lesson that there's no
  point and no way to fight piracy.
 
    [deleted]
 
    shaan7 - 4 hours ago
    There is, just make it easier (and in some cases, even
    possible) for people to pay for content (see the comment above
    https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=15920913)There are always
    people who are ready to pay and people who will go to every
    length to not to. Instead of focusing on giving a good
    experience to the first crowd, companies end up screwing it up
    and then waste time on trying to force the second crowd to pay.
 
      digi_owl - 3 hours ago
      That reminds me of the fanfare up in the cold north when
      Netflix expanded their offerings those shores. Only that once
      one checked the catalog on offer, it was downright anemic.
      Several TV series lagged by multiple seasons for
      example.Never mind that since then Netflix have lost the
      right to distribute quite a few movie catalogs that may hold
      hidden classics, as they shift their focus onto producing
      their own content and the copyright holders wants to keep the
      percentages that Netflix got for themselves.This however
      leads to market balkanization and drive people to once more
      consider alternative sources.
 
      scandinavegan - 3 hours ago
      I read a great article years ago where a Disney executive
      argued that they had to view pirating as a competing business
      model, and provide a better experience instead of just trying
      to shut it down.Disney and pirates compete on price, quality,
      availability, ease of use, and so on. Price is going to be
      hard to compete with since pirated stuff is free, and I guess
      they are attacking the availability of pirated material to
      increase their own by comparison, but what I wish they would
      focus on is to make it easier for the user to find the stuff
      they want. If I knew I could go somewhere for all of Disney's
      catalog of shorts and feature films, I'd be happy to pay a
      small amount per movie or subscribe for continuous access.
      Instead it's spread across multiple services, or you have to
      buy individual DVD boxes and try to assemble your own
      collection which is a lot of work. They could make it a lot
      easier for me to watch that specific short (now I go to
      YouTube and hope it's there) or movie (I check if it's on
      Netflix or another streaming service, and if not, I skip
      it).My (limited) experience of NFL.com is that they've done
      great when it comes to making it easy to watch current and
      older games, with options to subscribe to all games or just
      one team. The English Premier League doesn't have the same
      centralized streaming service I know of and instead depends
      on selling the rights to TV channels to show games, which
      leads to consuming a lot of pirated material if you want to
      follow a specific team all season or want to watch all
      concurrent games.If the content providers just compete in the
      areas they can affect, most people will pay to use it it's
      more convenient than the alternative.
 
        icebraining - 2 hours ago
        Disney is building their own streaming service, so you may
        get your wish. Not sure about the "small amount", tough.
 
    sharmi - 5 hours ago
    For the one TPB that has survived, there are several file
    sharing websites (decent ones that are actually usable) and
    torrent sites that have been pulled down and the copyright
    owners have prevailed. I think this more points to the
    technical acumen of the ppl behind TPB.I am not taking strong
    sides against or for fighting piracy.  I do hope the greater
    share of the profits do end up with the original authors and
    not the content distributors.
 
      digi_owl - 3 hours ago
      These days TPB is little more than a indexer of magnet
      links.I think there was a claim floating around that one
      could offer all the TPB magnet links in a simple text file
      that would be a maybe a MB in size.
 
        anc84 - 2 hours ago
        It's more but not even 100MB: https://archive.org/details
        /pirate-bay-torrent-dumps-2004-20...This does not include
        the descriptions though.Also check out
        https://github.com/sergiotapia/magnetissimo
 
        Teever - 1 hours ago
        I downloaded it once.  The entire catalog of TPB in magnet
        link form worked out to 63mb zipped IIRC.
 
  sveme - 5 hours ago
  There's the extremely annoying tendency at least at German
  streaming providers (iTunes, Amazon/Google Video) to remove
  rental access to movies about nine months after DVD release or
  when a second movie of a series is about to arrive at the
  theatres. Only buy access remains accessible. Now that physical
  video rental stores are on terminal decline, online stores have
  an effective oligopoly without real competition and push
  customers towards paying a maximum. The only alternative in this
  case remains thepiratebay.
 
    madez - 3 hours ago
    Aren't you afraid of receiving a 'Abmahnung' for torrenting?
 
      tekmate - 2 hours ago
      I'm still dumbfounded that the practise of setting up torrent
      honeypots by agencies like waldorf&frommer is actually legal
 
      WA - 1 hours ago
      That's why you use a VPN when downloading Torrents.
 
    dotancohen - 1 hours ago
    Abstinence is not an alternative?I've never understood why so
    many people feel that they have to see every superhero movie or
    every Blockbuster.
 
    WA - 4 hours ago
    For Germans: Create a US iTunes account, buy USD iTunes gift
    cards on eBay Germany, put in the account. Rent from the US
    store.
 
      rkachowski - 4 hours ago
      This proves the exact point that customers who wish to
      legally pay for content have to jump through a ridiculous
      number of hoops.Register an account in a different country,
      pay for a gift card in another currency, suffer international
      transaction fees + currency conversion rates, then manage
      multiple accounts with different balances depending on when
      iTunes has juggled around it's regional stores.Or just visit
      pirate bay.
 
      dx034 - 2 hours ago
      Isn't that as bad as downloading via torrent? In many
      countries the sole consumption is not considered illegal
      (only sharing is), so violating iTunes terms could be even
      worse theoretically.And as a side note it could open you up
      to getting your main account blocked by Apple if they start
      cracking down on that.
 
    chrisper - 5 hours ago
    There is also the issue that movies in Germany and such only
    have the German Audio track in 5.1, but the English one is in
    2.0. How ridiculous.
 
      coldtea - 5 hours ago
      But most Germans don't care for the english track in the
      first place, being used to subbed dialogue.
 
        chrisper - 4 hours ago
        But there is no technical reason not to include other
        languages in 5.1? I would get the argument for DVDs and
        maybe live TV, but not for streaming...
 
        egeozcan - 4 hours ago
        There are a lot of immigrants, like me, who can speak and
        understand German but miss a lot when watching
        movies.Subtitles would help a lot but even that is missing
        with a lot of providers (I wonder what people with hearing
        disabilities do).
 
          distances - 3 hours ago
          At least Netflix has always German subtitles. For series,
          English subtitles too most of the time, but practically
          none of the movies have those in English which I find
          quite weird.
 
        jhasse - 4 hours ago
        It's changing. I'm seeing movies in English a lot more
        often in cinemas than I did 10 years ago.
 
  jacobr - 5 hours ago
  It's really cool that many torrents that are over 10 years old
  are still seeded.
 
  jyriand - 3 hours ago
  I subscribed to Amazon Prime, thinking that I can stream series
  and movies that I was interested in, only to find, that only
  things that I could watch were shows produced by Amazon
  itself(Man in the High Castle etc), channels and movies were
  restricted content because of my location. I don't understand why
  it's still an issue.
 
    bederoso - 3 hours ago
    You can blame that on the studios, they make licensing content
    extremely complex.Streaming services (Amazon, Netflix, etc)
    would love for you to be able to access their catalog from
    anywhere (as you can see since Amazon allows you to watch their
    own content from anywhere) but are limited by contractual
    clauses and/or exorbitant fees, which make this sort of deal
    not worth it.Studios are used to a territory-based model
    instead of a globalised market, since that's pretty much how
    cable works, so when you negotiate content with a studio the
    contract will tell exactly which territories you're allowed to
    stream the content from.
 
    juliendorra - 2 hours ago
    It is still an issue because of the way the market is
    structured. Movies exclusive distribution rights are sold
    separately to distributors in each country to maximize
    revenues, in advance if possible. (Or once the movie has toured
    festivals for independent movies, making it impossible
    sometimes for years or forever to buy a digital download in
    one?s country)
 
  marcoperaza - 3 hours ago
  So I see that you run https://eggerapps.at/ , where you sell
  various pieces of software that I'm sure you've spent a lot of
  time creating and perfecting.How would you like it if I set up a
  mirror with cracked versions of all of your apps, and then
  successfully diverted all of your sales to it?And then when you
  sue me, how would you like it if I openly mocked you? I'll post
  your takedown letters on a section of my site where I call you a
  fool, do the digital equivalent of spitting in your face, and
  continue to flagrantly violate your rights.That's exactly what
  the Pirate Bay does and I don?t understand how someone who sells
  their painstakingly created intellectual property could support
  that, let alone admit to participating in it.Edit: na85, and what
  if I only divert 10% of the sales? Why should I now be totally
  innocent?
 
    [deleted]
 
    na85 - 3 hours ago
    >and then successfully diverted all of your sales to it?No
    doubt you can back up this assertion that the pirate Bay
    diverted all or at least the majority of movie sales.
 
    rprime - 2 hours ago
    Given that he himself is a creator and someone directly
    affected by piracy (in this case software cracking) I assume he
    knows what he's talking about.As a creator as well, I am aware
    that my software is out in the wild and people are using it for
    free and so far I've yet to notice any harm coming from it,
    quite the contrary. Even if we live in a connected world, we
    still don't live in a fair world, having a credit card or a
    PayPal account is still a hard thing to obtain in quite a bit
    of countries and so it happens that from time to time I receive
    emails of users that are using cracked version of my software
    offering to snail mail me checks or asking me for alternative
    payment methods, in these cases me knowing that they get enough
    joy of my apps is payment enough.In my case I do believe this
    is free marketing, in the end a good chunk of users come back
    and buy the apps if it's truly useful for them and counting the
    others that wont buy it as lost sales is stupid as they would
    not spend the money anyway.
 
thriftwy - 2 hours ago
I wonder why isn't there torrent-search-over-DHT yet?I mean, this
is known point of vulnerability.Maybe it's because owners of
popular bittorrent software don't want that feature?
 
  jokoon - 1 hours ago
  btdb.io and btdigbtdig seems better as it doesn't have annoying
  pop ups, which are constantly brought up on btdb, even with
  ublock origin and noscript. I would not be surprised that btdb is
  buying ads from an ad provider that sell js injections to a MPAA
  operated third party.btdb is nice because you can sort by seeds,
  you cannot with btdig.To be honest I stopped using classic
  torrent indexers entirely since I started using DHT indexes. They
  have much larger choice. The issue is that you cannot "post"
  magnets links on the DHT automatically (I think you cannot), so
  the DHT works as long as people are finding magnets or torrents
  elsewhere. It's bringing more decentralization, which mean more
  chaos but much less traceability.
 
metafunctor - 1 hours ago
Completely beside the point...  perhaps useful for the non-native
English folk.  I was wondering what sort of message a "cable" is in
this context, because it is obviously not a length of cable.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Diplomatic_cable
 
ploggingdev - 5 hours ago
If you're interested in learning more about The Pirate Bay, the
founders and the trial, watch the documentary called TPB AFK (The
Pirate Bay : Away From Keyboard) :
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eTOKXCEwo_8One of the founders of
TPB, Peter Sunde started:* Njalla (https://njal.la/) - a privacy
focused domain registration service* Flattr (https://flattr.com/) -
a tipping/micropayment service to support content creators* A VPN
service - https://ipredator.se/Another link that you might find
interesting, his interview with Vice :
https://motherboard.vice.com/en_us/article/qkjpbd/pirate-bay...
 
  Marazan - 5 hours ago
  Does it talk much about the financier Carl Lundstr?m's role in
  TPB?He never gets mentioned much for some reason** Because of his
  far right connections
 
    ploggingdev - 4 hours ago
    IIRC it does, but only briefly. He bought advertising space on
    TPB and it became a controversy. The TPB guys were falsely
    accused of being right wing extremists for doing business with
    Carl Lundstr?m.
 
      Marazan - 3 hours ago
      Woah, woah. He was a co-defendant at the trial. He was more
      that just a dude who bought some ad space.
 
        [deleted]
 
      icebraining - 2 hours ago
      The allegations by the prosecution are of a bit more than
      that: https://gigaom.com/2008/02/02/who-is-the-fourth-man-in-
      the-p...
 
fsloth - 5 hours ago
"The new confessions of an economic hitman" by John Perkins is a
very good exposition of the close ties of state and corporate
powers in the US and how they co-operate to increase the capital
wealth of the elite.It's more autobiographical than a research
document, and has some unproven claims, but no one has punched
holes in the important claims there AFAIK.
 
antigirl - 4 hours ago
do people still use piratebay ? there are better alternatives now
 
  mac01021 - 2 hours ago
  For example?
 
    jokoon - 1 hours ago
    DHT indexes, btdig and btdb.io
 
dghughes - 59 minutes ago
People aren't stupid they know it's wrong to download a movie or
music they didn't buy. But everyone agrees the response by the US
law enforcement is overreaching and out of proportion.Convenience
is the real reason people went to websites such as the Pirate bay
not stealing, people don't buy fast food for their health.The rise
of cheap and reliable streaming video websites such as Netflix
changed that. That's all anyone wanted a convenient reliable way to
legally watch and pay a reasonable amount.
 
cup-of-tea - 4 hours ago
The copyright industry has had far too much power for many years
now.  But when I talk to people about this nobody cares.  For most
people the products of this industry are just "content" which they
use to waste their time so I suppose it makes sense that they don't
care too much about it.  The tragedy is that the copyright industry
controls a large and continually growing part of our culture and
their power is only increasing.I was there when a UK music tracker
called OiNK's Pink Palace was shut down.  The police raided the
home of the site owner before dawn and even the home of his father
who had no idea what his son was up to.  Copyright industry writers
wrote the news article, claiming it was "extremely lucrative" and
included gems such as "Within a few hours of a popular pre-release
track being posted on the OiNK site, hundreds of copies can be
found".The site's owner was found not guilty in court several years
later, but not before the copyright industry essentially ruined his
life.But how does this happen?  If you talk to most people they
don't understand  copyright at all.  They think it's some kind of
privileged status that you have to pay for, like a trademark or
something.  Most people are not even aware that they hold
copyrights.  And why would they?  Can the average person summon the
police to help protect their copyright?  Of course not.  It's not
even a criminal matter.  The police being involved seems nothing
short of corruption.
 
  ptero - 1 hours ago
  > But how does this happen?IMO both the patent and the copyright
  laws, at least in the US, are broken. The original goal was good:
  encourage individual inventors to make technology that the whole
  society will benefit from at a price of some limitation on use by
  society for a short period of time. In the current system, "the
  whole society will benefit" part does not work because time
  limits are too high -- at the modern technology pace, in 20 years
  most inventions are obsolete.I think the best way to fix it is to
  drastically shorten the time the invention is protected, which
  would require major compromises. Unfortunately, the discussion
  now seems very polarized: it seems to be "all information should
  be free" against "copyright everything and it needs to last
  longer, longer, longer" as major camps with little in the middle.
 
  expertentipp - 3 hours ago
  Copyright hoarders (not necessarily content creators) consider
  anyone sharing the content they hold copyright to as competition
  and attack will full fury, destroying humans' lives and jamming
  the local jurisdictions. They use all available strategies - top-
  down (PB in Sweden), bottom-up (cease and desist letter plague in
  Germany). How anyone competent allows them for doing it is
  unimaginable, there must be fraud and corruption involved.
 
    aquadrop - 2 hours ago
    It's not all black and white though. Pirating torrent site
    realistically don't care if pirated stuff is from copyright
    hoarder or content creator. It's easy to say "those corporate
    money grabbers are evil" but in reality nobody cares who to
    pirate from. I've seen one writer who was relatively popular,
    beg his readers to buy his books instead of pirating it,
    because publisher was going to end his contract, because it was
    just not very profitable with all the pirating. I fail to see
    glory for pirating in that. One programmer I knew decided to do
    shareware in early 2000-s. His program became pretty successful
    in several months (2-3x times larger revenue than average
    salary in the country at the time), he could live off it. First
    time he got cracked and program went on pirating sites his
    sales were damaged considerably, he added some protection, new
    features etc. After some time he got cracked again and sales
    were damaged again. This time he said "screw it", stopped
    working on the program and got regular job. I fail to see glory
    for pirating in that.Of course I understand the appeal of
    pirated content, sometimes it's the only usable way to get
    something, especially for some old movies/series. And it put
    pressure on large media companies for content delivery
    technologies etc. But it's not all fun and giggles, it's a
    complex issues requiring global discussion and compromises.
 
      Feniks - 2 hours ago
      I've developed my own golden rule: if something is 5 years or
      older its public domain.TPB and digital piracy in general
      functions as a library of Alexandria. Nobody in our society
      gives a shit about keeping things available. It's all about
      NOW and MONEY. So much entertainment would be lost without
      the internet.
 
        wil421 - 1 hours ago
        Ever heard of a real library? They will order almost any
        book from other libraries. The one in my county is even
        free.
 
        eli - 2 hours ago
        Are there other areas besides digital media where you think
        it's acceptable to take copies or something to which you
        are not legally entitled?
 
          tazard - 1 hours ago
          Are there areas other than digital media where you can
          make copies so cheaply and easily?
 
          JohnBooty - 1 hours ago
          Does that question make sense outside the domain of
          media?
 
          vanderZwan - 1 hours ago
          > legally entitled?When discussing the validity of
          copyright laws, using legal entitlement as an argument is
          pretty circular, don't you think?
 
          croon - 1 hours ago
          Everything you've learned in your life, in school or
          out;Do you give proper credit to the
          creator/author/inventor/discoverer of that knowledge, or
          refrain from using it?The question isn't whether this
          happens to be legal or not, the question is whether it
          should be, and to what extent.Do you have any example
          which you were wanting to compare to, or was the question
          deliberately open-ended?
 
          pessimizer - 1 hours ago
          I sometimes sing songs in front of people.
 
          lostcolony - 1 hours ago
          To -make- copies, not -take-.And yes. Every photocopy a
          text book? Ever trace out a comic book panel or other
          image? Ever make copies of a photo (obviously more common
          digitally, but could be done in the film age too) that
          you didn't take originally? I've done all of them,
          they're all things I'm not legally entitled to do.
 
          space_fountain - 38 minutes ago
          I feel like there is a key difference in all the examples
          people are giving. Taking a picture of a text book for
          personal use is a only a small part of the complete work
          closer would be scanning the entire thing. Further
          assuming you keep it to personal use it's also very
          different than spreading it to others.
 
      croon - 1 hours ago
      > It's not all black and white though. Pirating torrent site
      realistically don't care if pirated stuff is from copyright
      hoarder or content creator. It's easy to say "those corporate
      money grabbers are evil" but in reality nobody cares who to
      pirate from.Some do, some don't.I don't doubt your anecdotes,
      but I doubt it's true as a pattern.Something being pirated 1M
      times never means 1M lost sales. It could mean 2K lost sales
      or it could mean 200K lost sales.The book your writer wrote,
      did it build on a genre, area of expertise, setting that
      inherently draws inspiration from earlier works? Where do we
      draw the line on what you can borrow?If copyright law was as
      established and enforced 400 years ago as it is today,
      Shakespeare wouldn't exist (in our knowledge).We want some
      kind of middleground. Creators should be compensated, but
      complete all-encompassing DRM means only a fraction of people
      would've watched Game of Thrones to discuss it at the water
      cooler, Kanye West (regardless of what you think of his
      music) wouldn't be able to release most of his music, etc.
 
      netzone - 2 hours ago
      I agree. And this is why I no longer pirate stuff, if I can
      get it legally in a reasonable way. For me as a non-american
      though, there is a serious lack of content available to me,
      which means that if I want to watch something, sometimes the
      only available option is to pirate it.
 
        barking - 2 hours ago
        Or when the legal way is unpleasant. I couldn't watch GOT
        on sky Atlantic with its ad breaks every ten minutes.
 
          delecti - 50 minutes ago
          That's a much less sympathetic position. It's one thing
          if there's literally no way to consume a piece of
          content. The copyright holders aren't losing money there.
          It's another if there's a perfectly viable method
          available but you want to put on your toddler voice and
          say "but I don't want it that way."
 
        freeflight - 1 hours ago
        > sometimes the only available option is to pirate itI once
        had to pay 500? for torrenting an episode of The Americans
        that I had no way of buying legally, at least in my country
        at that time.The only thing I regret? Using torrent and not
        some alternative where they can't get you for "illegal
        distribution".
 
  imglorp - 38 minutes ago
  I think the content industry is the one really driving this whole
  net neutrality thing, even more than the ISP business.  If you
  follow the money, content is around a $2 trillion annual
  business, and ISPs are only a few hundred billion.
 
    okreallywtf - 35 minutes ago
    Do you have a source to a link between the content industry and
    anti-NN? I assume there is more to it than just "they have a
    lot more money".
 
  scirocco - 2 hours ago
  Reminds me of the case with TPB. The court argued for large sums
  of ad revenue and the founders were like: ?no idea where that
  money went because we never saw it?
 
  marcoperaza - 3 hours ago
  He was running a website that revolved around violating millions
  of copyrights. Why shouldn't he go to jail? What gives you the
  right to take someone else's painstakingly created artistic
  creation and give it away for free to thousands of people,
  depriving them of the exclusive right to sell their own
  work.Copyright is both a criminal and civil matter. The civil
  court system is useful for many things, but it is limited to
  monetary damages, which is not very helpful when the damages are
  in the millions and the defendant isn't very wealthy. The penal
  power of the criminal system is not appropriate for individual
  people downloading music, but it certainly is for a sophisticated
  operation involving the illegal distribution of millions of
  copyrighted works to hundreds of thousands of users.== Edit
  ==Some responses, since I'm rate-limited:>In most cases i read
  about it's more a matter of the current copyright holder versus
  the facilitator. Not a matter of the creator versus the actual
  downloader.Two points.1. How do you think the current copyright
  holder got the copyright? They acquired it from the creator by
  either paying in advance or after the fact or as part of some
  ongoing deal.2. If you run a market that you know is used almost
  exclusively by people selling contraband, do you think that's
  legal just because you're not the buyer or the seller? In case
  you don't know, it's not, and you'll go to jail just as if you
  had sold the contraband.>If the defendant isn't wealthy after
  distributing all that content, is the content worth millions? Or
  is the government-enforced business model worth millions?Yes,
  intellectual property isn't worth anything without government
  enforcement. But we've decided to, as individual societies and as
  an entire world by treaty, to provide such enforcement, because
  we think recognizing such property rights is good for our
  society.And as for the first point, how much you make by
  violating other people's rights isn't that relevant. If I steal a
  truckload of iPhones and give them away for free, I still stole
  them. I realize IP is very different from physical property, but
  the profit of the crook isn't that relevant in either.
 
    zouhair - 2 hours ago
    You do know he was found innocent.
 
    Spearchucker - 3 hours ago
    Surely if what you say is true, the courts would have found him
    guilty, no?
 
      marcoperaza - 3 hours ago
      >Surely if what you say is true, the courts would have found
      him guilty, no?What are you actually arguing, other than
      pointing out that he was acquitted? A jury's determination of
      a person's guilt in a particular case doesn't tell you what
      the law is, or what it ought to be.Edit: gnode, that?s not
      true. Only determinations of law, which are only made by
      judges, are precedent. A jury verdict, which only determines
      questions of fact, is not precedent at all.
 
        gnode - 3 hours ago
        In a common law system, findings of a court set precedent
        for future trials. So yes, juries do tell you what the law
        is by telling you how to interpret it.
 
    b3lvedere - 3 hours ago
    "What gives you the right to take someone else's painstakingly
    created artistic creation and give it away for free to
    thousands of people, depriving them of the exclusive right to
    sell their own work."In most cases i read about it's more a
    matter of the current copyright holder versus the facilitator.
    Not a matter of the creator versus the actual downloader.That
    is exactly the weird paradox that has been going on, especially
    with the infamous Pirate Bay.The users think they are a super
    server with super hero admins that "give back to the man".The
    justice system thinks some super tech criminal is earning
    millions. They think that, because organisations like the MPAA
    give out an estimate on what "could have been earned if all
    those people would actually pay full price for the content they
    are now consuming".Numbers are magic.. especially if there's a
    currency sign before them.
 
    humanrebar - 3 hours ago
    > ...depriving them of the exclusive right to sell their own
    work...i.e., messing up their business model> Copyright is both
    a criminal and civil matter.Sure, but there's a strong case
    that copyright infringement shouldn't be felony.>  ...the
    damages are in the millions and the defendant isn't very
    wealthy.If the defendant isn't wealthy after distributing all
    that content, is the content worth millions? Or is the
    government-enforced business model worth millions?
 
      icebraining - 2 hours ago
      If the defendant isn't wealthy after distributing all that
      content, is the content worth millions? Or is the government-
      enforced business model worth millions?I don't think he
      should go to jail, but this is an odd rebuttal. If I steal
      your car and sell it for $300, because I don't really need
      more money, will you claim just that amount as your
      loss?Obviously copyright law pushes up the price, by
      introducing scarcity, but that doesn't really have anything
      to do with how much he made.
 
    ekianjo - 3 hours ago
    > Copyright is both a criminal and civil matterOh yes?
    Copyright infrigement is pretty much a victimless crime -
    nobody is removed from any of their property - at most they
    might be losing some monetary compensation, but that's
    something that can be evaluated and compensated if that is the
    case.Not sure how you can justify putting folks in jail based
    on that fact.
 
      eli - 1 hours ago
      Couldn't you say the same for embezzlement or tax fraud?
 
        shakna - 1 hours ago
        Tax fraud is against the state, those funds that go towards
        the foundational things required by our society, such as
        electricity, drinking water, and access to other
        services.Everyone is a victim.
 
    dpwm - 3 hours ago
    > He was running a website that revolved around violating
    millions of copyrights. Why shouldn't he go to jail? What gives
    you the right to take someone else's painstakingly created
    artistic creation and give it away for free to thousands of
    people, depriving them of the exclusive right to sell their own
    work.Why should an individual be treated so differently to what
    a company would? When was Youtube's office raided? To this day,
    Youtube holds immense collections of music for which nobody has
    bothered to file even an automated takedown notice.The point
    that the parent made is that copyright is only criminally
    enforceable if held by the moneyed few. The power that has been
    handed to large corporations by the back door is immense and
    there is very little symmetry; even when the magnitude of the
    damage is orders of magnitude greater.In the UK they have
    effectively been granted the power to block domains for
    customers of the ISPs that represent a significant majority of
    the UK market. This is in a court that routinely allows pre-
    hearing legal costs of hundreds of thousands of pounds. Unless
    you work for the media companies and have insider knowledge,
    how can you even be so sure that the media companies are not
    acting with the complete contempt of due process that they have
    repeatedly demonstrated.> Copyright is both a criminal and
    civil matter.Only fairly recently, and not without controversy
    from the people that observed it.
 
      tlunter - 2 hours ago
      I don't work there, but it seems naive to think that YouTube
      hasn't worked with law enforcement or these industries
      directly to remove these copyrighted works. If your rip is
      simple or obvious enough, YouTube blocks it immediately
      before it's published. That seems very different from hosting
      a site specifically for pirating copyrighted works.
 
        dpwm - 1 hours ago
        When I referred to repeated demonstrations of contempt of
        due process I was largely thinking about the over-zealous
        takedowns where fair use has applied and that it is just as
        likely that with being granted direct blocking of an ever-
        increasing number of domains that some claims are over-
        exaggerated to the court and the threshold for evidence
        lowered.I acknowledge that it seems very different from
        hosting a site specifically for pirating copyrighted works.
        But there was a time when Youtube arguably blurred the line
        and gave publicity to the "our users just posted it and we
        didn't know about it" defence.There's a real societal risk
        to treating what would formerly be called culture as
        intellectual capital and granting extreme powers to owners
        of that capital. Though the costs of distribution have
        never been lower there comes a point where the cost of
        distribution exceeds the expected returns. Even if the work
        is distributed for free, there is still a cost.If we're
        going to allow the whole one download equals 0 < x <= 1
        lost sales thing that seems to be increasingly accepted
        now, then you are implicitly allowing that it is the lost
        sale that is the problem. As such, distribution of out of
        print material without fee is as damaging because if I
        listen to n hours per week of material then I am not buying
        that n hours of material and I have deprived a sale. The
        same can be said for any intellectual capital, even
        copyleft, that does not make money. Effectively, it becomes
        a divine right to have customers which is a bizarre line of
        thinking that seldom seems to be explicitly stated.I have
        listened to works that I could not, even though I strongly
        desire to, buy on CD or obtain by lawful download. There
        are some who argue a particular line that has the corollary
        that the work should be lost forever and I should never
        have heard them. By the lost sale argument I definitely
        shouldn't have and should instead have spent money on new
        culture that personally I find quite grating.There are
        books, games, software, songs, albums, movies and TV series
        for which the copyright persists and effectively makes it
        civilly or criminally unlawful to distribute for free. In
        these cases I would certainly think twice before taking on
        the burden of becoming that distributor.
 
        dustinmr - 2 hours ago
        Your argument is based on intent. YouTube shows their
        intent to not infringe by the effort they put into removing
        infringing content.But the GP discards intent as a relevant
        point and says if you host it, you should be thrown in
        jail, regardless of intent.Likely, somewhere in the middle
        is more reasonable. But the parent is correct in that the
        volume of infringing content on YouTube appears to be
        significantly larger than just about anywhere else, and no
        one is raiding their offices. No one is going to jail.So
        the asymmetry is striking. If it were all purely civil
        rather than criminal, I'd get it.
 
          marcoperaza - 1 hours ago
          >But the GP discards intent as a relevant point and says
          if you host it, you should be thrown in jail, regardless
          of intent.I said no such thing to be clear.
 
          space_fountain - 42 minutes ago
          Does great Britain? I know the US has the DMCA which
          among many other things says people can't be held labial
          for infringing content hosted on their site if they
          respect and follow DMCA take down requests.
 
    [deleted]
 
    b3lvedere - 2 hours ago
    On paper you are absolutely right. Does it make it right? Maybe
    so, maybe not."But we've decided to, as individual societies
    and as an entire world by treaty, to provide such enforcement,
    because we think recognizing such property rights is good for
    our society".Remember Aaron Schwartz?
 
    gatmne - 2 hours ago
    Legality aside, whether sharing copyrighted information is
    amoral or not is determined by one's own values. Some people,
    myself included, see a person's right-to-share to  be far more
    important to humanity than the authors ability to employ an
    ill-suited business model to profit off his or her work. There
    are many ways to generate profit other than to infringe on
    others' right to share. Humanity does not owe you a successful
    business model, and certainly not at the expense of it's right
    to share.> What gives you the right to take someone else's
    painstakingly created artistic creation and give it away for
    free to thousands of people, depriving them of the exclusive
    right to sell their own work.Users sharing copyrighted work
    does nothing to prevent authors from profiting off their work.
    Conflating sharing and business is what got us in this mess in
    the first place.
 
      msc1 - 2 hours ago
      Think about 3rd world countries. I'm relatively better off
      than my peers (2 cars, own a house etc.) but I can no way
      afford Hex Rays IDA Pro, Burp Site Professional, Navicat
      Premium or JetBrains and this list goes on... They cost more
      than my two or three months of rent.My parents are both
      medical doctors and their medical books are not affordable if
      they were sold in US prices but they have 3rd world print
      editions and they can legally buy these copies. Software
      vendors have to adapt to tthis too. Gaming companies already
      adapted this and I've never pirated any games since Steam.
      I'm a paying netflix, spotify customer because they are
      priced for the country they operate and as you can guess I'm
      not torrenting music or movies either.Internet is global but
      purchasing power is not. Ethically, I see no problem in
      torrenting. Human knowledge is "on the shoulders of giants"
      and in philosophical perspective -I'm not advocating this-
      even copyright is on shaky grounds (Property is theft! -
      Pierre-Joseph Proudhon)
 
        freeflight - 1 hours ago
        > Gaming companies already adapted this and I've never
        pirated any games since Steam.The first to adopt this, very
        successfully, had actually been Apple with their approach
        to selling mp3s.While everybody was still busy trying to
        sell overpriced physical albums, complaining about the
        "digital thievery", Apple took this as an opportunity with
        iTunes. iTunes made buying music digitally as convenient as
        it was pirating it, at the same time iTunes allowed
        customers to only buy specific songs (at reasonable
        prices), instead of forcing them to buy whole albums.Valve
        did something similar for gaming with Steam, that's true,
        but it took Steam way longer to get there than it did take
        iTunes. Imho Steam has also regressed quite a bit in that
        regard, it used to be a place for good deals but
        increasingly feels like a platform to shovel around
        shovelware for badges and trading cards.
 
        omio - 2 hours ago
        Wow that is a name I haven't read or heard in years.
        Pierre-Joseph Proudhon, father of modern anarchism.
 
beloch - 2 hours ago
I'm sure there are many reading this who have absolutely no
sympathy for pirates.  They're stealing and that's that.Well, how
do you feel about your government blackmailing, extorting, or
otherwise "strong-arming" other sovereign nations in order to foist
its laws upon them and then hiding that from you?  (It really is a
minor miracle this cable was released at all.) Is it truly worth
stooping to such measures to ensure that Micky Mouse remains
copyright protected for all time everywhere?  Don't other nations
have the right to make their own laws?  How would you feel if some
other nation foisted it's laws on the U.S. in such a manner? Why
does the U.S. government go to such extremes for private enterprise
anyways?[1]Piracy is bad.  What the U.S. government has done in
response is worse.[1]I suggest you google the United Fruit
Company's history the next time you're eating a Chiquita banana for
a real eye opener.
 
[deleted]
 
koliber - 3 hours ago
Interesting aside: is the redacting technique vulnerable to an
analogue of the "timing attack" on certain crypto?The name of the
employee in the wires has been redacted. I wonder if the physical
size of the redacted box, together with the fact that this is a
name, together with a database of public employees, could be used
to uncover the identity of the person.By comparing the size of the
redacting box with the lines above and below, we can guess that 6-9
characters are masked out (including the space). This is an a rough
parallel to a timing attack used against crypto. The DB of public
employees could be thought of as a list of candidate inputs.Weak
redacting?This reminds me of a law in Poland where a person accused
of a crime can not be named. Media will blur out photos and state
something to the effect of "Mark W. an executive at XYZ Corp.,
stands accused of ...". If the accused is a well known actor with a
unique first name, this becomes a running joke.
 
[deleted]
 
upofadown - 3 hours ago
Canada has been on the 301 watch list for a long time now. There
have been some attempts to get off it (theatre camcording law) but
it turned out that that the real reason a country is put on the
list is a lack of fawning obedience to the US copyright cartel. A
country that is perceived to not be toeing the line is put on the
list. If there no actual policy reason to be there the copyright
cartel just makes stuff up.So these days the list is meaningless
and is roundly ignored by Canada. Sweden probably should of did the
same thing.
 
ronjouch - 6 hours ago
Honest question: why is this surprising / newsworthy?
 
  fsloth - 5 hours ago
  Because exposition of abuse of power requires proven concrete
  examples.
 
  zdkl - 6 hours ago
  It's important to not forget what the web used to be, in order to
  have some context for what it's becoming (see Net Neutrality).
 
  jacobush - 6 hours ago
  At least to me a Swede, this [datacenter] "... was raided by 65
  Swedish police officers" is so incredibly out of touch with
  normal reality in this country, on so many levels.* Copyright
  infringement case assigned to that many officers? Unheard of.
  High profile murder investigations don't get that many.* We have
  this peculiar law, that ministers are NOT TO meddle in the
  running of government agencies. Yet, this is what we got.* From
  cautious "see what happens" attitude among prosecutors with
  regards to copyright infringement and copying for personal use -
  to a big leap: not only an attempted (though only partially
  successful) witch hunt of Pirate Bay founders, but also inventing
  a whole new crime, called "accessory to copyright
  infringement".Not that I don't agree that what Pirate Bay did was
  at times shady, but the whole thing made me believe without a
  doubt a few things:- US as a case of "wag the dog". The trade
  associations (RIAA etc) in the US can easily make the state do
  their bidding. And the US state as an institution is quite weak,
  when it does these things so quickly. What that implies, is that
  there is no thinking things through. No serious cost/benefit
  analysis can possibly have been made. "How much ill will from
  foreign countries is this move worth? Fuck that, do it now."-
  That Sweden would be pushed around so quickly. I must have been
  naive, but it was surprising how not even a symbolic attempt at
  saving face was made here. Our domestic response was decisive and
  swift. Can't help but make you wonder what we could be made to do
  to ourselves over something more serious than fucking copyright
  infringement. Dance, monkey, dance.
 
    staticelf - 5 hours ago
    Yes especially when pretty much all other crimes except murder
    and stuff like that are disregarded nowadays. Swedens judicial
    system is completely broken.
 
      draugadrotten - 5 hours ago
      ...And police officers and whistleblowers like Peter
      Springare that dares to speak out about it are ostracized and
      made persona non grata.
 
      jacobush - 5 hours ago
      Though I agree with much of that, I didn't want to conflate
      what happened 10 years ago with the current situation. The
      current situation needs it's own whole topic/thread.Edit:
      though now we are talking about current situation anyway, I
      feel there is a chance to turn things around for the better.
      But it would probably involve many very big adjustments, one
      being massively higher salary for police officers. (Like 30%
      more.)
 
      bionoid - 5 hours ago
      Norway is the same for the record. There was a local case
      recently where the police knocked down an innocent man on the
      street, handcuffed him, and charged him with assaulting a
      police officer. There were something like 30 eye witnesses,
      still he lost in court, police clearly giving false
      testimony. Luckily he did win the appeal.
 
        jacobush - 5 hours ago
        "Luckily he did win the appeal." ... so system is not
        broken?Edit: I misunderstood. I thought the officers were
        punished. Sorry.
 
          bionoid - 5 hours ago
          They knocked him down on the street, arrested him,
          charged him, dragged him through two years of trials.
          After winning the appeal, the chief of police mocked him
          openly and called him a liar. There was ZERO
          repercussions for any of the involved officers.That's not
          broken?edit: and you could look up the historical cases
          like Tonny Askevold. Charges of first-degree murder was
          dropped. The police can and will do whatever the fuck
          they want.
 
        staticelf - 3 hours ago
        The difference is that in Sweden the police doesn't do
        anything. Even if you give them a lot of evidence they drop
        the cases all the time.I have personal experience of this.
 
          digi_owl - 3 hours ago
          "Henlagt grunnet bevisets stilling" (effectively claiming
          that the case will not be investigated due to lack of
          evidence) have become a running joke in Norway.
 
    draugadrotten - 5 hours ago
    As a comparison to the 65 police officers that raider the
    Piratebay datacenter,gang murder investigations in Malm?,
    Sweden nowadays involve 3 police officers.Source:
    https://www.sydsvenskan.se/2016-12-10/tre-poliser-istallet-f...
 
      expertentipp - 2 hours ago
      The "disproportional resource allocation" of the police and
      authorities begs for further investigation.
 
    croon - 5 hours ago
    My wife had her credit card info stolen, and used it for about
    $3000, which was all that was on it. I recognized the site they
    used for purchases (also in Sweden), and called them up. They
    were very forthcoming and froze the account/purchases upon
    number verification (the card was already locked to be disposed
    at that point). They obviously couldn't give out any personal
    information to me, but they had information available on who it
    was for any police inquiry.I relayed this information to the
    case handler, and yet immediately after I get a form response
    of "We've shut this case down since it's obvious there's no way
    to solve it".We only needed the report to get our money back
    through insurance, but it really pisses me off that the police
    doesn't have resources to solve a case that I have solved for
    them, yet can spend _65_ officers on a political sham.
 
      Tepix - 5 hours ago
      I've had the same thing happen with a flight that was booked
      with my credit card on the same day that I cancelled it
      (probably some guy at Mastercard making some extra
      money).Booking a flight seems like it's something that's very
      easy to track down who benefits, doesn't it?
 
    ahoka - 4 hours ago
    Then why do you keep voting a government like this?
 
      digi_owl - 3 hours ago
      All governments are fucked.I have seen up and coming
      politicians in Norway basically become big media's
      mouthpieces over this topic, because otherwise their
      political carer is toast.Damn it, when the law was up for
      review. The panel had strict rules about what parts of the
      law they could recommend changes for. Effectively they were
      only able to consider of the copyright duration should be
      extended or not.
 
  thomastjeffery - 6 hours ago
  It need not be "surprising" to be worthy of discussion.The fact
  that the US has so much control over international copyright law
  enforcement is a big deal.The fact that a site that does not host
  copyrighted material was taken down in the name of copyright law
  is a big deal.
 
    erikb - 5 hours ago
    What he says is not that he doesn't know it. What he says is
    that everybody knows it since years and the article doesn't
    contain anything that hasn't been known already.I wouldn't
    fully agree with that, but his question is quite clear, imo.
 
      aquadrop - 5 hours ago
      Well, since it was about things that long ago, new people
      grew up for whom that might be newsworthy.
 
  [deleted]
 
  jokoon - 1 hours ago
  It confirms that american businesses can apply pressure on a
  geopolitical and diplomatic level, which is scary.Laws should
  apply to their own countries. If a foreign business can influence
  how the law is applied, it should be perceived as the US doing
  things that should be out of its reach. That's something empires
  do, and if they keep doing it, it will taint a bad image on the
  US.
 
pferde - 5 hours ago
Got to love the 'privacy' instead of 'piracy' typo in the first
cable screenshot:"2. Summary. In a visit to Sweden last month to
raise the growing concerns about Internet privacy in Sweden, the
Motion Picture Association of America (MPA), together with ..."
 
louhike - 6 hours ago
I've discovered some days ago that the thepiratebay.org domain was
available again. Is it linked to the original one or is it just a
proxy?
 
  kowdermeister - 6 hours ago
  I use it often so somebody keeps it running, actually there are
  dozens of mirrors running on various ccTLD-s. The source must be
  available somewhere online so you can spin up your own instance.
 
    Mayzie - 5 hours ago
    It is. As The Pirate Bay don't host any .torrent files, only
    magnet links, on memory the entire site came to under 200mb.
 
      [deleted]
 
  callesgg - 5 hours ago
  It was only down for a few months. I have read that other people
  are running the website these days.It has degraded a bit but
  essentially it works fine most of the time.
 
  Strom - 2 hours ago
  What do you mean by again? Was it blocked by your ISP previously,
  or do you mean that it used to redirect to others like .se?
  Because I'm pretty sure the .org domain has continuously worked
  for me since 2004 when it was registered.
 
marcoperaza - 4 hours ago
And why shouldn't the US have pressured Sweden to take down the
Pirate Bay? The people running that site are openly and proudly
flouting copyright laws and allowing American-owned (among other)
content to be downloaded without payment to the owners.Very large
portions of the US economy are dependent on international
enforcement of copyright and patent law. If the US isn't using its
leverage over other countries to make them enforce intellectual
property laws, then it is failing to protect its citizens' economic
security.
 
  Strom - 2 hours ago
  Yes it might be very much fine from the US perspective to do
  this. Things change however once you look from the other side. It
  can easily be in the economic interest of other countries to not
  pay the US copyright holders, especially 100 years after
  something was created.So this is not so much about claiming the
  US is doing something against the interest of US citizens. This
  is about other country politicans/judges/police being corrupt,
  taking benefits from USA and acting against the best interests of
  the people they promised to defend.
 
  praxeum - 3 hours ago
  Not only that, but the people running TPB has earned millions
  from advertising revenue, literally earning money off other
  peoples' work.
 
jesperlang - 6 hours ago
Wow, 10 years ago already? This was quite big here in Sweden back
when it happened. It's scary how quickly these things slip out of
our conscience (at least mine). It's chilling what you can get away
with by just staying cool for while... Or is the short term damage
in PR not worth waiting it out for the long?
 
coldtea - 5 hours ago
>At the time there were some rumors that Sweden would be placed on
the US Trade Representative?s 301 Watch List. This could possibly
result in negative trade implications. However, in a cable written
April 2006, the US Embassy in Sweden was informed that, while there
were concerns, it would not be listed. Not yet at least. ?We
understand that a specialized organization for enforcement against
Internet piracy currently is under consideration,? the cable reads,
while mentioning The Pirate Bay once again.Typical, not so subtle,
blackmail.One wonders what would happen if, say, the leader of some
disclosure website was residing in Sweden and a superpower wanted
him...(From a comment below on TPB case: "The judge was Thomas
Norstr?m. Swedish public radio revealed that the judge, Thomas
Norstr?m, is a member of several copyright protection associations,
whose members include Monique Wadsted and Peter Danowsky ?
attorneys who represented the music and movie industries in the
case. According to the report, Judge Norstr?m also serves as a
board member on one of the groups of which Mrs. Wadsted, the Motion
Picture Association of America?s attorney, is a member." -- hurray
for independent justice in any case..)
 
  marvin - 2 hours ago
  The best part: The vast majority of all Scandinavians honestly
  believe that we have almost no corruption and that out justice
  system is so close to perfect that it is hardly necessary to
  discuss improvements.
 
  robert_foss - 3 hours ago
  Overall the whole series of events was pretty offensive, and once
  again it paints the picture of the US being a schoolyard bully.
 
    RobertoG - 2 hours ago
    Business as usual, but better the bully than the
    psychopath.From Wikipedia's "1954_Guatemalan_coup_d'?tat":"[..]
    The United Fruit Company (UFC), whose highly profitable
    business had been affected by the end to exploitative labor
    practices in Guatemala, engaged in an influential lobbying
    campaign to persuade the U.S. to overthrow the Guatemalan
    government. U.S. President Harry Truman authorized Operation
    PBFORTUNE to topple ?rbenz in 1952; although the operation was
    quickly aborted, it was a precursor to PBSUCCESS."Reading about
    those things, one get the impression that the Department of
    State works for the Camber of Commerce, instead of the USA
    citizens.(1).
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1954_Guatemalan_coup_d%27%C3%A...
 
      paganel - 1 hours ago
      > Reading about those things, one get the impression that the
      Department of State works for the Camber of Commerce, instead
      of the USA citizens.If I'm not mistaken the first permanent
      "embassies" were set up by the Venetians (mostly) and the
      Genovese, and their role was essentially just that, i.e.
      protecting the economic interests of their "home" entities.
      It so happened that most of the time protecting the citizens
      who happened to reside in foreign countries also meant
      protecting their home-city economic interests, but that
      mainly happened because the citizens involved were traders
      themselves. So, in a way, you could say that what the
      Department of State is now doing is just the continuation of
      the initial idea of a "foreign embassy".
 
        RobertoG - 1 hours ago
        Surely, the role of the embassy of a power, ruled by a
        oligarchy of merchants and aristocrats, it's very different
        from the expected role of the embassy of a democratic
        federal republic.Just joking. As you say, business as
        usual.
 
realusername - 6 hours ago
I remember the piratebay trial being a gigantic farce where some of
the judges had ties to copyright organisations. It's crazy how much
power have these mafia-like organisations.(edit: spelling)
 
  erikb - 5 hours ago
  > mafia-like organisationsWhy not write "governments"? It's much
  shorter.
 
    [deleted]
 
  draugadrotten - 5 hours ago
  The judge was Thomas Norstr?m. Swedish public radio revealed that
  the judge, Thomas Norstr?m, is a member of several copyright
  protection associations, whose members include Monique Wadsted
  and Peter Danowsky ? attorneys who represented the music and
  movie industries in the case. According to the report, Judge
  Norstr?m also serves as a board member on one of the groups of
  which Mrs. Wadsted, the Motion Picture Association of America?s
  attorney, is a member.That this passed without causing a conflict
  of interest is astonishing. https://www.csmonitor.com/World
  /Global-News/2009/0423/pirate...Also worth mentioning is that the
  lead investigating police got a job from Warner Brothers very
  soon after the trial was successful. Thank you, job well done.
  https://techcrunch.com/2008/04/18/officer-who-investigated-p...In
  recent news, the chair of Swedens Supreme court judge Stefan
  Lindskog has been implied in shady financial transactions, and is
  under investigation by the police. The belief we once had that
  Sweden had a low level of corruption can be put to history.  And
  of course even having a low level still means there is some
  corruption. https://www.expressen.se/nyheter/polisen-utreder-
  hogsta-doms...YMMV.
 
    paradoja - 5 hours ago
    It is my impression that corruption measures usually indicate
    corruption available or actively done by normal people without
    power (eg. bribing officers to get licenses or similar
    things).Corruption by big corporations and similar things is
    usually another thing (although if things are corrupt in the
    low level, they will for sure be in the higher levels).
 
    marksomnian - 5 hours ago
    Nitpick: "without causing a conflict of interest" is incorrect,
    as there most definitely was a CoI. You probably meant to say
    "conflict of interest scandal" or words to that effect.
 
    Cthulhu_ - 4 hours ago
    > Also worth mentioning is that the lead investigating police
    got a job from Warner Brothers very soon after the trial was
    successful.Can you blame them? Thanks to that case the guy got
    a lot of experience in the area of copyright violations and
    online piracy, that's valuable knowledge to have and they could
    use someone to advise them.You're implying that he did it for
    the cushy job he got for it, but I have my doubts. Maybe if you
    can prove he got the offer before the investigations started?
 
      tonyedgecombe - 3 hours ago
      It's hard to prove but there is still a dirty smell around it
      all.
 
ckastner - 3 hours ago
It never ceases to amaze me how much influence the MPAA has.Movies,
while extremely popular, don't generate that much money: in 2016,
total box office results in the US were under $12bn [1]. That's the
entire industry.Apple alone makes that much money in three weeks'
time.Amazing, that you can apply such pressure to politics, with so
little.[1] https://www.statista.com/statistics/187069/north-
american-bo...
 
  wellboy - 3 hours ago
  What about licences for when the movies come out on dvd and are
  shown on the numerous tv channels in 100+ countries. I can
  imagine then this figure amounts to a multiple, maybe $40B?That's
  a large industry definitely and a powerful one.
 
    FanaHOVA - 3 hours ago
    And streaming rights for Netflix/Hulu/Whatever other platform
    there is (lots of them). TV royalties are also paid every time
    the movie is aired.
 
      wellboy - 40 minutes ago
      Indeed and this per year. So, you're looking at $400B over
      ten years.
 
  ekianjo - 3 hours ago
  > Movies, while extremely popular, don't generate that much
  money: in 2016, total box office results in the US were under
  $12bn [1]. That's the entire industry.It's underestimated since
  it's a global business, plus they there's a very long tail for
  every movie to turn a profit, DVD/BR releases, TV, and online
  reselling, renting, etc... and the fact movies remain their
  property for 75 years+, and for some companies like Disney they
  retain the copyright forever, and keep sellings goods like
  cupcakes as well.
 
  astura - 2 hours ago
  American box office results are far from the only source of
  revenue for movies. Their is foreign box office, DVD/Blueray
  sales, digital sales, digital rentals, streaming fees, and
  broadcast fees.In Blockbuster's heyday their revenue alone
  surpassed American box office sales.
 
    samwillis - 2 hours ago
    Don't forget product placement, in film advertising,
    endorsements (both in film and around its marketing)...Oh and
    merchandising... that's a big one!
 
  digi_owl - 3 hours ago
  It's because so few care about copyright. It is seen as something
  dry and stodgy that only affect artists and their
  publishers/labels.This perhaps because once the cassette
  recorder, never mind the VCR, came to be, most nations on the
  western side of the wall decided to not go full police state and
  thus added a "friends and family" clause to their copyright
  laws.This meant that a person could create a copy, if it was
  meant for a direct friend or a relative. This avoided having to
  park a copyright cop in every home in the nation.Never mind that
  producing analog copies from tape to tape cause of a noticeable
  loss of content with each generation removed from the
  original.But the computer, never mind the internet, changed all
  that. It made mass copying not something that required massive
  machinery in a warehouse, but something every kid could do in
  their own home. Especially as bandwidth and storage capacity kept
  improving at a massive rate.And digital copies do not degrade
  like an analog one does.
 
    icebraining - 2 hours ago
    The organizations also play a game of the Boy Who Cried Wolf.
    Remember Home Taping Is Killing Music? By their propaganda, the
    music industry should have died multiple times in the past few
    decades.
 
spodek - 2 hours ago
The framers of the U.S. Constitution knew the risks of the
government creating and granting monopolies, however limited. The
incentives are to remove the limitations and expand them.The
industries formed by these government-granted and defended
monopolies have removed most of their limitations and keep growing.
We see the benefit to them. They make big blockbusters that people
enjoy watching, so we see that benefit.The costs keep growing too,
such as this article and the deprivation from the public domain of
nearly a century of work. Meanwhile, technology has lowered the
costs of production and distribution, making investment for most
works unnecessary, obviating the need for a monopoly.Have the costs
grown to outweigh the benefits? The monopolists' power can maintain
the monopolies past when that point so it's hard to tell, and
people with different values will disagree, but this article points
in that direction.
 
wimagguc - 5 hours ago
To remove pirated movies from the interwebs there are two options
really: either attack content providers / trackers etc, or, find
the users directly.In Germany, as soon as you start a torrent
client, your traffic is being monitored by bots and agents, and if
you upload something inappropriate you (or your host) will get a
letter from a law firm with a heavy fine. (I know of two friends
who had to pay $600 and $3000.)
 
  _Codemonkeyism - 5 hours ago
  "In Germany, as soon as you start a torrent client, your traffic
  is being monitored by bots and agents"How is traffic monitored
  when I start a client? Don't I need to download/upload something
  to get monitored? Is the monitoring connected to trackers I
  download from or ISP monitored?"[...] with a heavy fine."Was it a
  fine or some kind of fee? ("Abmahngeb?hr")
 
    wimagguc - 5 hours ago
    I'm not familiar with the German legal system but the sum did
    depend on what they've uploaded. (It was detailed in the
    letter, if I remember correctly, $600 for half an episode-of-
    whatever and $3000 for multiple movies.)As for the traffic
    monitoring, indeed, I'd imagine it to be honeypot tracker where
    all content/traffic is visible rather than something installed
    on the ISP side.
 
      JohnStrange - 5 hours ago
      No it's not the tracker, it also works for magnet links and
      people get letters for downloading.There are companies who
      join the download swarm and register all other downloading
      parties. That's very easy with bittorrent, since the protocol
      is (originally) designed for fast download sharing without
      any regard to anonymity or pseudonymity.[1] The process is
      not reliable for providing evidence of copyright
      infringement, though, and the German system mostly works by
      scare tactics of lawyers - many people don't want to risk a
      lawsuit even if they could win it.[1]
      https://torrentfreak.com/thousands-of-spies-are-watching-
      tra...
 
        zaarn - 5 hours ago
        These companies are the scum of the scum, tbh, I recall I
        once got a letter claiming I must pay about 6000? for
        illegally downloading "Debian 5 Linux Netboot ISO" and
        "Ubuntu 12.04 x86 Full ISO" or something along those
        lines.They sent some awfully scary letters for what amounts
        to legally obtaining an ISO file.
 
          notzorbo3 - 2 hours ago
          I used to run an abandoned warez site when I was young. I
          received a lot of cease and desist letters from
          "lawyers". They usually failed to identify the infringing
          material, failed to show they had the right to act on the
          copywriters behalf and a staggering amount of them
          confused trademark infringement with copyright
          infringement. Also, ever last one I received via email.
          Yeah, right, like that's going to hold up. I ignored all
          of them and never got even so much as a follow up.In
          other words, such things are considered low-hanging fruit
          by these companies. Just throw it out there and see what
          sticks.
 
          zaarn - 1 hours ago
          Luckily the german system is less strict than the DMCA,
          you can fact-check any letters you get, you only need to
          act if you know (for certain) it's illegal
 
      akerro - 4 hours ago
      > $600 for half an episode-of-whatever and $3000Insane, you
      can get a good VPN from TorGuard, PIA or NordVPN for 10x less
      than half of an episode!
 
    Tepix - 5 hours ago
    I think he is saying that there are companies monitoring the
    trackers.
 
  scandinavegan - 3 hours ago
  At least a few years ago in Sweden, all cases where someone had
  payed a fine for downloading pirated material due to such letters
  was because the person admitted guilt. The anti-piracy
  organizations had no way of forcing someone to pay, because none
  of the evidence would hold up in court. They tried to submit
  screenshots of IP addresses, but since it's easy to spoof it
  wasn't enough to convict someone.I don't know if this has changed
  in recent years, as I haven't heard anything about it recently.
 
  danielwarna - 5 hours ago
  Copyright holders have been sending those kinds of settlement
  demands in Finland as well. They seem to be monitoring the
  torrent swarm for relevant IP addresses so that they can demand
  that ISPs hand over account holder's names. ISP are by law
  required to hand over this information if the users has shared
  something illegally to "a significant degree".They settlement
  demands have been between 500? and 3000? and they have usually
  been lowered in the cases that have gone to court. A few have
  however ended up footing legal costs in the tens of thousands.
 
    exDM69 - 4 hours ago
    > ISP are by law required to hand over this information if the
    users has shared something illegally to "a significant
    degree".ISP's only hand over data by court order but in the
    past few years, court orders have granted this right to pretty
    much every request from the copyright holders. ISP's are now
    contesting this and there were two recent judgements in the
    courts to allow ISPs not to hand over the data. See this [0]
    (in Finnish).So the situation is now better in Finland,
    partially because the predatory abuse from copyright holders'
    law firms sending out tons of "fines".[0] https://www.turre.com
    /operaattori-voitti-oikeudenhaltijat-tu...
 
  amelius - 5 hours ago
  So no Tor exit nodes in Germany, I suppose ...
 
    zaarn - 4 hours ago
    IIRC there are Tor exit nodes in germany, they also filter some
    traffic but only on the lowest amount of effort they have to do
    legally. Ie the usual suspects: illegal porn, illegal torrents
    (usually also porn) and websites not conforming to strict
    german industry standards.
 
      mrighele - 3 hours ago
      How does the node operator know what traffic should be
      blocked (i.e. that something is illegal porn or illegal
      torrent) ? Is there an official source that says for example
      which website should be blocked and that is enough  ?
 
        r3bl - 2 hours ago
        I have a Tor relay (not an exit node) running in
        Germany.Once I started reading other people's experience of
        running an exit node through that ISP (Hetzner), it turned
        out that the hosting company was the one receiving these
        reports and forwarding them to you. After it, the
        consequences can range all the way from warnings to
        physically shutting down your server until you do something
        ridiculous (IIRC send them a physical mail).Since I didn't
        want to risk my server being shut down for whatever reason
        (there are some other uses of it non-Tor related, and the
        rest of the monthly bandwidth goes towards Tor relay), I've
        decided to just not run the exit node.I'd say it's still
        very useful to the Tor network, since it handles something
        like 400 GB of Tor traffic per day.
 
        Strom - 2 hours ago
        Unlikely that there is a public list, but a node operator
        could certainly compile such a list based on angry letters
        they receive.
 
          mrighele - 2 hours ago
          That would be my approach too, but I was wondering if
          this would be enough to stay out of trouble.
 
          zaarn - 2 hours ago
          Under german law, yes, notice-and-takedown is basically
          all you need to adhere to; if you are aware of illegal
          activities, you must take measures to stop them. (But
          unlike the DMCA for example, you are allowed to verify
          any notices thoroughly before taking action, you only
          have to listen to verified claims)
 
        zaarn - 2 hours ago
        I was sort of joking a bit but I do know that german node
        operators block some traffic.However, it's on a purely
        notice-and-takedown basis, which is the DMCA of germany but
        more broadly applicable; if you are made aware of illegal
        activity on your network you must stop the activity and
        take reasonable measures to prevent future abuse. They can
        also fall under the network operator laws in which case
        they are not responsible for the traffic at all but I'm not
        sure if that is applicable to tor nodes or not.
 
  chrisper - 4 hours ago
  In Switzerland piracy for private reasons (non-commercial) is
  legal!
 
    LaundroMat - 4 hours ago
    In Belgium, you're allowed to download, but not to upload.
 
      chrisper - 4 hours ago
      Hmm... maybe it is like that,too. I'd have to do some
      research.
 
        madez - 3 hours ago
        In Germany downloading is no problem, too. Uploading is
        what they try to get you for.