GOPHERSPACE.DE - P H O X Y
gophering on hngopher.com
HN Gopher Feed (2017-12-14) - page 1 of 10
 
___________________________________________________________________
The Limits to Growth (1972) [pdf]
48 points by lainon
http://www.donellameadows.org/wp-content/userfiles/Limits-to-Gro...
ts-to-Growth-digital-scan-version.pdf
___________________________________________________________________
 
spodek - 2 hours ago
I remember the first time reading this book, or rather the 30 year
update -- https://www.amazon.com/Limits-Growth-
Donella-H-Meadows/dp/19... -- thinking, "this is the approach to
take to understand how the economy, ecology, pollution, and so on
interact."Everything else was just looking at elements. Technology
is important, for example, but exists within a system. They looked
at the system. They had to simplify and assume a lot, which the
media didn't understand (probably benign ignorance) and critics
blew out of proportion (probably maliciously), but I found their
approach the most meaningful.Sadly, I know many people who care
about the environment but don't understand the (relatively simple)
math in their approach, and many people who understand the math but
don't care about the environment, but almost no one who cares and
understands. So in about a decade since reading it, I haven't found
anyone I can talk to about it meaningfully.A great companion by one
of the authors is Thinking in Systems by Donella Meadows --
https://www.amazon.com/Thinking-Systems-
Donella-H-Meadows/dp....Both changed my views more than almost any
other books.
 
  wjnc - 2 hours ago
  With all respect to the authors, the thinking at that point in
  time and the impact it made on the world and you: Much of their
  predictions haven't stood the test of time.-No exhaustible has
  been depleted yet and the price mechanism combined with
  technological progress seems pretty able to set incentives
  straight. Look at what the oil price bubble of the '00s did for
  electric cars and batteries in the now. -The world has seen
  massively more population growth than they modelled, but not the
  accompanying food shortages they predicted. I'd argue the
  shortages of the '80s and '90s are over, although local
  situations obviously have tragic effects (Syria, Venezuela).
  -Material goods production (plastics) is at an all time high.
  -Many more humans alive at lower poverty levels than ever before
  and ever imagined by the Club of RomeThey got the depletion of
  fish stocks right though. Although arguably, that was the
  simplest prediction since the 'tragedy of the commons' is so
  profound in international fishery.The gloom of the club of Rome
  just didn't work out. I guess outside of way we are treating our
  environment, humanity has a lot to be proud of. (I feel the
  environment is going bonkers and we are a plastic-addicted throw
  away society.)
 
    chappi42 - 1 hours ago
    > although local situations obviously have tragic effects
    (Syria, Venezuela) Considering people who came to Europe in the
    last time you can at least add Afghanistan, Pakistan,
    Palaestina, some African countries to this list. And I'd say
    (apart from often atrocious politics) it's b/c there are too
    many young man and no work.> Material goods production
    (plastics) is at an all time high  with worldwide measurable
    effects on the sea. (Immission probably due to only 6 large
    rivers, but still)(many more signs)I fear the Club of Rome will
    work out very well in time
 
    tom_mellior - 1 hours ago
    > No exhaustible has been depleted yetWhat did they predict
    would be depleted by December 2017, and where did they predict
    it? Be specific please.> The world has seen massively more
    population growth than they modelledHas it? What does their
    model predict for December 2017? Be specific.(http://sustainabl
    e.unimelb.edu.au/sites/default/files/docs/M... shows an almost
    perfect fit of population growth predictions and historical
    data until 2014)> Material goods production (plastics) is at an
    all time high.Yes, that's lovely. Where did they predict
    otherwise, for December 2017?> I guess outside of way we are
    treating our environment, humanity has a lot to be proud of. (I
    feel the environment is going bonkers and we are a plastic-
    addicted throw away society.)Agreed.
 
      wjnc - 1 hours ago
      Are you not asking of me a much higher degree of rigour than
      the Club of Rome demonstrated?The simplest: No exhaustible
      has been depleted yet. See table 4. Add the years in columns
      3 or 4 or 5 to 1972. Gold, mercury, silver were predicted to
      be exhausted by 2017. None are.
 
    danmaz74 - 1 hours ago
    With this kind of long term predictions, it's practically
    impossible to get the numbers right - ie the number of years it
    will take for resource X to end, how many billion people Earth
    can sustain, etc. But this doesn't mean that there are no
    limits to growth (on Earth): in the last 40 years we invented
    lots of great technologies that improved the efficiency in how
    we use lots of resources and reduced the pollution created by
    production, but there is no silver bullet in sight that could
    make those disappear.Just like Moore's law, it worked much
    longer than anybody expected, but in the end we still hit many
    limits, and we can say for sure it's not going to last forever
    even if we don't know when it's going to really end.
 
    [deleted]
 
    spodek - 1 hours ago
    You've mischaracterized their work.They didn't predict what you
    said they did. They showed a range of possible outcomes based
    on assumptions, among many. You seem to have picked one outcome
    as their only one and called it their prediction.They created a
    model based on a systems approach whose output depended on
    assumptions on physical properties of the planet and future
    human choices. Given the large uncertainties, they ran the
    model under many sets of assumptions and presented the
    outcomes.The point of the book is to illustrate and promote a
    systems perspective, not just a linear, event-based approach,
    which you seem to prefer.
 
    jk2323 - 2 hours ago
    Hey Dude, keep Bullshitting!"There is No Steady State Economy
    (except at a very basic level)"
    http://ourfiniteworld.com/2011/02/21/there-is-no-steady-
    stat...Limits to Growth?At our doorstep, but not recognized
    http://www.resilience.org/stories/2014-02-12/limits-to-
    growt...Wealth And Energy Consumption Are Inseparable
    http://www.declineoftheempire.com/2012/01/wealth-and-energy
    -...Galactic-Scale Energy http://physics.ucsd.edu/do-the-
    math/2011/07/galactic-scale-e...
 
      vixen99 - 1 hours ago
      Thanks! And are the arguments put forward in these links
      considered at executive level? Seems to me - not at all
      because preset agendas dominate drowning out the logic.
 
  DennisP - 46 minutes ago
  I agree, and for climate economics especially it makes a lot more
  sense than equilibrium models.Something I found especially
  interesting in the LtG model is that the costs of dealing with
  environmental damage and extracting more scarce resources build
  up gradually over time, but the way it works out is that economic
  output keeps growing rapidly for a while, until these costs
  become overwhelming and it all suddenly crashes down. Everything
  looks great until you're on the verge of catastrophe.But to this
  day, people look at our growing economy and think this refutes
  LtG, because they assume it predicts a gradual decline.
 
shoo - 3 hours ago
Here's a paper from 2014 that compares historical data from the 40
years since the limits to growth study was released:http://sustaina
ble.unimelb.edu.au/sites/default/files/docs/M...