GOPHERSPACE.DE - P H O X Y
gophering on hngopher.com
HN Gopher Feed (2017-12-12) - page 1 of 10
 
___________________________________________________________________
A list of ways to "Break the Internet" for the 48 hours before the
FCC vote
45 points by doener
https://www.battleforthenet.com/breaktheinternet/#join
___________________________________________________________________
 
DoreenMichele - 7 minutes ago
TLDR: Would anyone care to explain to me pros and cons of net
neutrality and Pai's plan?Confession: I have never really
understood what net neutrality was about. So I decided to look it
up.[1] And also asked the internet what the FCC plans to do to
repeal it.[2]I am interested in seeing actual thoughtful discussion
of the issue instead of mudslinging, pretty please. I am open to
hearing arguments from both sides. I just would like it served up
without name calling and that sort of thing. You know: Like HN
encourages routinely.Then maybe I can decide in some kind of semi
informed way if I want to help break the internet or not.Thanks.1.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Net_neutrality2.
https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/the-switch/wp/2017/11/21...
 
  jayess - 4 minutes ago
  Prepare to be downvoted straight into hell for even questioning
  the prevailing narrative on HN.
 
    ajkjk - 3 minutes ago
    Well that's not productive at all. If anything, the HN comment
    section is the best place on the internet I know of to actually
    hear reasonable explanation of this.
 
    [deleted]
 
  SilasX - 2 minutes ago
  I don't like to admit it, but I'm in the same boat as you.  I've
  heard NN refer to everything from:1) Throttling sites the ISP
  doesn't like, to2) Any kind of penalty for heavier users, to3)
  Charging for access to special pipes that are faster, when both
  sides want to pay a premium for speed and reliability.Unless I
  ask directly I have a hard time discerning what someone means by
  NN, and even then I don't know how well it maps to what new
  regulations will actually do.
 
ryanwaggoner - 24 minutes ago
I may be alone, but this feels completely hopeless. This
administration is the most corrupt, craven, and citizen-hostile in
our history. Net neutrality is hardly the biggest problem facing
America, and they keep doing much worse things, almost out of
spite. And Congress has proven to be utterly feckless in their duty
to hold the executive branch accountable. So I guess I just don't
really see the point of engaging, because they. do. not. care.
about. us.At the end of the day, we need to flip control of
Congress. I don't think anything else will work.
 
  paulddraper - 21 minutes ago
  > they. do. not. care. about. us.One might wonder how they got
  half the votes when the other side cared. so. much. about. us.
 
    ryanwaggoner - 18 minutes ago
    Actually, they didn't get half the votes. And the tribalism
    that's rampant in our politics today means that many voters are
    making choices based on lies and misinformation.
 
      rdruxn - 16 minutes ago
      But good thing you know for certain you?re above all that!
 
        ryanwaggoner - 11 minutes ago
        I'm not above falling victim to bad sources, confirmation
        bias, or other foibles of human knowledge, but I try to be
        aware of that and guard against it. Not perfectly, I'm
        sure, but that imperfection doesn't mean that we all have
        an equal grounding in the truth.This downward spiral into a
        crisis of epistemology ("who can really know anything for
        sure? there are so many lies out there! there is no way to
        discern truth!") is a fundamental strategy of authoritarian
        regimes (Russia), and it's being put to good use in this
        country.EDIT: typo
 
    blacksmith_tb - 1 minutes ago
    It's clear where this debate is going. But to take us back to
    where we started, I would suggest that it's highly unlikely
    that a Clinton-administration FCC would be preparing to repeal
    the Title II protections for broadband. Not that I don't care
    about plenty of other issues, but the difference on this one
    seems clear.
 
    williamdclt - 1 minutes ago
    As a non-american, both side seem to be equally part of "they".
    H. Clinton is only the "other side" of Trump because the
    american politic system is de facto bipartite. Which easily
    answer one's wonder: "they" did not only get half the vote,
    "they" got all of them.To the question "how did they got the
    vote to be finalist", I'm afraid I don't have a better answer
    that the one that's repeated and repeated so much that it's
    becoming a gimmick: money, media, fear and stupidity
 
  marcoperaza - 20 minutes ago
  Have you considered that maybe there are thoughtful reasons why
  people might disagree with your policy views? If you really can't
  understand conservative policy aside from it being "corrupt,
  craven, citizen-hostile and spiteful", then maybe you haven't
  really given the issues much thought yourself.
 
    jayess - 18 minutes ago
    Disagreement is no longer permitted. No matter which "side"
    you're on, the other side is relegated to a platitude.
 
      ryanwaggoner - 14 minutes ago
      Perfectly said, but ironically, since I'm not on "the other
      side" here from a political perspective. I voted for Bush
      twice, Obama once, didn't vote in 2012 (sadly) but would have
      voted for Romney, and wouldn't be saying any of this if Mike
      Pence was president. But amusingly, you assume that my
      disapproval of Trump means that I'm "on the other side" and
      just spouting platitudes. Ironic.
 
        ColanR - 10 minutes ago
        eh, I only got the impression you were "on the other side"
        when you mentioned flipping control of congress.
 
          ryanwaggoner - 8 minutes ago
          For better or worse (probably worse) we have a two party
          system, and one party has full control of Congress and
          the executive branch. So "flipping control" in this case
          means breaking that lock on power. I don't really want
          Democrats to hold Congress and the White House either.
 
    ryanwaggoner - 16 minutes ago
    My view on this administration is about more than their policy
    positions.For the record, I grew up conservative, my whole
    family is, I'm fairly libertarian in my views, and I didn't
    vote for either major party due to their policy positions. I
    understand conservative policy perfectly well.
 
    lemoncucumber - 4 minutes ago
    I can sympathize with the idea of relying more on market-based
    approaches, but in my view that would require pretty aggressive
    anti-trust enforcement. In other words: I can see an argument
    for allowing monopolies but regulating them heavily (a-la the
    AT&T of old), or for light regulation in a highly competitive
    market (and relying on competition to prevent companies from
    screwing their customers).It seems like most Republicans want
    neither significant regulation nor significant anti-trust
    enforcement, and I just can't see how they would honestly
    expect that to produce any result other than a small number of
    monopolies charging customers whatever they want and ramming
    whatever practices they want down their customers' throats.
 
  40acres - 19 minutes ago
  Agreed.I've been following this administration closely in the
  past year. It appears that they do nothing in good faith. Just
  look at how Congress tried to pass the health care bill and tax
  bills. If you want to fight for net neutrality you better turn
  out to vote for candidates who support your position. At the end
  of the day control of Congress is the only way to ensure this.
 
  llamataboot - 12 minutes ago
  I agree. This fight is already lost.Other than that, I'm not
  going to wade into politics here on HN today (learned that lesson
  the hard way a few times) other than to say I think we are at a
  point where actual representative democracy is at stake over the
  next couple years, and net neutrality, while a huge deal, is
  small potatoes compared to the fights we need to figure out how
  to win.
 
    AnimalMuppet - 6 minutes ago
    Representative democracy is in real danger, if not already
    lost.  To me, what's damaging it is that representatives regard
    themselves as representing Team Red or Team Blue, instead of
    their constituents.I think the coming fight is over
    Constitutional limits to executive power.  If we lose that
    fight, it's game over.  If we win it, we can worry about trying
    to fix representative democracy.
 
      llamataboot - 1 minutes ago
      It's almost tragic poetic justice that all the people on the
      right /and/ left that were trying to convince the middle that
      you don't concentrate so much unaccountable power in the
      Executive Branch during the Obama years only had to wait
      until the next election cycle to see what happens when
      someone truly unfit for that power grabs the reins.
 
  dhimes - 11 minutes ago
  Not to defend this administration, but we had to fight Obama on
  this too.
 
    ryanwaggoner - 7 minutes ago
    Obama's administration got a lot of things wrong too, but at
    least we won that fight, right? At least they eventually
    responded to their constituency? I may have the facts wrong
    though, please correct me if so!
 
    mmanfrin - 7 minutes ago
    We had to fight Wheeler, who then bowed to both public pressure
    and pressure from Obama to support net neutrality
    rules.https://www.politico.com/story/2015/01/tom-wheeler-net-
    neutr...
 
  wyager - 11 minutes ago
  > we need to flip control of Congress.Yes, that will fix
  everything.
 
    ryanwaggoner - 9 minutes ago
    Nothing will fix everything. But that wasn't my claim, so I'm
    having trouble seeing how your comment is being made in good
    faith. Is this just a "whataboutism" to imply that Democrats
    are just as bad so it doesn't matter?
 
  AnimalMuppet - 8 minutes ago
  Congress was feckless when the Democrats controlled it, too.
  Congress has been growing increasingly useless for the last 30
  years at least.Something is breaking in US politics.  Or, rather,
  several things are breaking - decency, civility, honesty, common
  sense, and probably several other things.  I don't know what the
  root cause is, or even if there is only one.
 
  noncoml - 7 minutes ago
  I would say don't blame the administration. Blame the corps and
  don't wait to vote every 4 years in the elections, vote every day
  with your wallet.To start, be reactive, switch to T-Mobile or any
  telco that is pro-net neutralityThen start being pro-active. Look
  for bad patterns in companies and punish them. For example,
  Google says they support net-neutrality but are happy to block
  amazon devices from playing youtube. Maybe it is time to give a
  clear message to Google that behaviors like this are not accepted
  by you?Replace Google with any X company. Don't be surprised if
  in 20 years X-company will only allow you to access X-stuff on
  X-devices running on X-network.Money is what makes the world go
  around. Use your money to steer the world to the direction you
  want.Or, you know, just keep using Google and Verizon because it
  is more convenient. But in this case you lose your right to
  complain.
 
    llamataboot - 3 minutes ago
    The problem with that argument, is it's damn near impossible to
    simply buy your way out of a rigged system. It's a nice
    premise, shopping ethically, but much like recycling isn't
    going to stop climate change, there's only so much power an
    individual consumer has in a large and complex system with
    perverse incentives.
 
    jerkstate - moments ago
    T-Mobile promotes a service called "Binge On" which is anti-
    net-neutrality: https://www.t-mobile.com/offer/binge-on-
    streaming-video.html Paying for a "fast lane" is anti-net-
    neutrality regardless of whether or not it is "pro-consumer"