GOPHERSPACE.DE - P H O X Y
gophering on hngopher.com
HN Gopher Feed (2017-12-12) - page 1 of 10
 
___________________________________________________________________
How to get your first 100k active users
137 points by annekate
https://blog.winnie.com/how-to-get-your-first-100k-active-users-...
ve-users-909fa4292a27
___________________________________________________________________
 
miradu - 1 hours ago
The advice to not only rely on push and native mobile hits home
hard - despite it being cool - email, text, and the web still work
really well to bring the customers in!
 
  annekate - 44 minutes ago
  Long live the web!
 
notaboutdave - 11 minutes ago
Best takeaways from the article (no particular order):  - Retool
ads as a way to test for and identify demand.   - Bait people with
truly useful content where they're already looking, and then direct
them to your app.   - Simple changes in wording or flow of UX can
increase shares dramatically.   - Get featured in app stores. How?
- Integrate with latest device features being pushed     - Adhere
to vendor design standards   - Email is still very effective.   -
Have 10 enthusiastic users that will spread their enthusiasm before
you start.  That last point is good to know, and perhaps the most
important, but it's way easier said than done. Especially if you
aren't a social butterfly.Also, the "don't use cross platform"
preached in the article isn't very convincing. You can get
excellent performance with well-coded cross-platform build tools,
and in far less time.
 
fabianuribe - 47 minutes ago
I love this kind of posts, by sharing the anecdotes of what worked
and what didn't, they provide a glimpse into the inner workings and
strategies for one of the biggest challenges for any startup, plus
most likely will generate a considerable influx of new users from
the post itself. Everybody wins.
 
amitmathew - 4 minutes ago
"Grow even before you launch" and "Go big or go home" really
resonate with me.We were able to sign up a few thousand people to
our waitlist with two main channels: exhibiting at conferences and
answering questions on Quora. In the past, I would have just done a
small beta with friends, but I guess I'm getting a little wiser
over the years :)Going big from the beginning is really a tough
one. I already got burned at a previous startup by not narrowing
the focus enough, but it really depends on the market and the type
of product you are building. We're building a product for college
students, which is a big group, so it's a toss-up whether to go
after a certain category of students or go after them all. We're
casting a wide net for now with the idea that our product will
resonate with certain subgroups which we can focus later.
 
greggarious - 43 minutes ago
You could just use fake users like Reddit
did.https://venturebeat.com/2012/06/22/reddit-fake-users/
 
ryanwaggoner - 1 hours ago
Not that you need my vote, but I agree with all of this. In
particular:- Go true native, not hybrid- Use ads for testing ideas-
Don't forget about email!I'm also intrigued by your approach of not
going market-by-market like a lot of local-focused marketplaces do.
Your approach seems to make sense, and obviously worked for you. I
particularly like that you had a different onboarding flow for
users in new markets, that's smart.But still, I'm not sure that
this approach would make sense for a lot of local-focused apps? I
think the fear would be that it would be relatively easy to get
100k users but they'd be spread out so thin that they'd find little
utility in the app and stop using it. So you'd have 100k users in
your database, but a tiny fraction of that in terms of actual
active users. But maybe that doesn't even matter, since you
wouldn't have had all those inactive users anyway?Could you speak
to that? I'd love to hear how many of those 100k users are DAU or
MAU, but understand if you can't share that :)Congrats!
 
  annekate - 1 hours ago
  Sure, of course! So this is one thing that might be unique to
  Winnie ? local data is one of our value props (and the best one)
  but it's not the only one. We discovered pretty early on that
  even in the local communities people were asking not-local
  questions like "what's the best diaper?". This told us that there
  was some demand to be part of a parenting community, even if it
  wasn't giving you particularly local insights. This is one
  feature of Winnie that works anywhere in the world, and we do
  have an active cohort of users who just use us to talk and get
  advice from other parents.We also did something that I forgot to
  mention in the article that helped us grow nationally before we
  had a lot of proprietary data. One of the nice things about
  starting a company in 2017 is that there are tons of great
  resources available to you. Free or cheap services that solve
  what used to be really hard problems are readily available. One
  such service is Foursquare. When we launched Winnie, if you
  opened the app in an area where we didn't have data, instead of
  showing you nothing we instead showed you results from
  Foursquare. This was admittedly not the best experience, but it
  gave people affordance to still find places and write
  reviews.Refusing to go market-by-market also forced us to build a
  bunch of proprietary and very cool infrastructure that collects
  data at scale. One early system we built could actually figure
  out which restaurants had changing tables and highchairs,
  nationally and instantaneously, at a VERY low cost. I can't say
  how we did that but you'd be surprised at what's possible if you
  have the will and ambition :)
 
  ythn - 43 minutes ago
  > - Go true native, not hybridWhat about for games? Unity is
  extremely tempting, especially when the alternative is to write
  the game twice in two different languages...
 
    annekate - 32 minutes ago
    Games are the exception to this rule. Apple and Google have no
    problem featuring games built in Unity as long as they are
    performant and polished.
 
      samschooler - 4 minutes ago
      Isn't this true for all apps? If an app is performant and
      polished, while also following UI/UX guidelines, it has just
      as good of a chance to be featured if is React vs Native? Is
      there anything that goes against this? Or is the idea its
      much harder to follow UI/UX guides while using a hybrid
      system?
 
    StavrosK - 23 minutes ago
    I don't think there's native for games. You're going to use a
    game engine and almost none of the OS UX conventions, so go
    with Unity. I don't think there are any developers that don't.
 
  onion2k - 25 minutes ago
  Go true native, not hybridUsers don't care. Most of them can't
  tell.
 
    firloop - 19 minutes ago
    The OP wasn't talking about users, but rather best practices on
    how to get the App Store makers to feature you. I've heard the
    App Store editorial team specifically give the "go native"
    advice.It's definitely not required, it just helps. Our app got
    featured in one of the App Store's daily stories despite it
    being written in React Native.
 
annekate - 1 hours ago
BTW, I'm the OP and am happy to answer questions here. My expertise
is obviously in consumer internet products but I spend a lot of
time thinking about growth. It's my superpower!
 
  jqbx_jason - 1 hours ago
  What's a "very modest spend" when it comes to advertising? How
  much is enough to validate whether and ad is or isn't working in
  your experience? Also did a majority of your new users come from
  being featured on app stores or was it primarily through turning
  the modest spend into a serious spend once the ad was converting?
 
    annekate - 55 minutes ago
    Enough to get statistically significant data. There are
    programs to get $100 AdWords or FB Ads credit and that's more
    then enough to get a few thousand to 10k impressions on your
    ads and give you decent data about how well they perform. I
    would usually set a testing campaign to spend about $10/day for
    5-7 days, and would shut it down early if it was looking
    particularly bad.Our app is free, so we aren't eager to pay for
    installs at any price, and paid aq is not a major channel for
    us. The lion's share of our new users come from organic search,
    social sharing, and word of mouth.
 
      jqbx_jason - 50 minutes ago
      Can I ask for a ballpark of what # of users it took to get to
      that inflection point when SEO and word of mouth takes over?
      At least in my experience getting to there has proven to be
      the main challenge.Also- thanks for taking questions and
      congrats on your success :)
 
        annekate - 34 minutes ago
        It entirely depends on the domain so there's no good answer
        for this.Our growth has been remarkably steady, with minor
        seasonal factors. If the majority of your acquisition
        channels scale with the number of users (SEO, social,
        viral) then you should see a steady accumulation of
        momentum over time, even from a very small number ? perhaps
        the low thousands.We've had a strong word of mouth factor
        from the very beginning, but I attribute that mostly to the
        brand and the fact that this is an underserved market.
        Parents have traditionally been invisible to tech companies
        and they are delighted someone is finally building for
        them.
 
  forkLding - 1 hours ago
  Canadian here, great to hear about your success, I'm on google
  play store and couldn't download, guess its US-only at this
  point?
 
    annekate - 45 minutes ago
    The Android app is US only, but you can also sign up on
    Winnie.com. We do have some Canadian users :)
 
  forkLding - 1 hours ago
  As well, got other questions, but understand if you don't want to
  answer, what did you think was the most important problem you
  solved for your users and how did you get people to really
  download your app after the beta stage?This also sounds like a
  good link that can go on indiehackers.com
 
    annekate - 46 minutes ago
    Thanks, I'll check it out.We solve an huge number of extremely
    important problems for our users. Some things just off the top
    of my head:- Find local daycares that have spaces available,
    which is pretty important when you need to work- Find a nearby
    restroom or changing table when you need one RIGHT NOW (and
    when you need one, it's usually RIGHT NOW)- Get parenting
    advice in real time on just about any topic- If you're someone
    who doesn't fit in with traditional parenting groups (mostly
    moms, mostly married, etc), connect with a community of parents
    like you (single parents, stay home dads, etc)- Find places
    where you can nurse or pump safely- Get suggestions for things
    to do with your kids, because they are bored and you need to
    get out of the house- Locate family-friendly restaurants and
    businesses when travelingEtc. In some ways this is actually a
    challenge as there's no single, dead-simple value prop that we
    can use. But I love Winnie. We're genuinely helping people be
    less stressed and more successful as parents.
 
  dna_polymerase - 39 minutes ago
  Regarding the part about native apps, would you go as far as even
  restraining from publishing any app, if native app developers are
  not available (or not in the budget) in the beginning?
 
    annekate - 29 minutes ago
    Depends on the product. Winnie's target demo is millennial
    parents who are mobile power users, so we knew the apps had to
    be best-in-class and we were prepared to invest in them.Not all
    products need to invest in amazing apps or apps at all, but if
    you don't have a decent app than ASO and featuring are not
    going to be available to you. This may or may not be important
    to your business.
 
    liquidise - 23 minutes ago
    I'll share an anecdotal opinion contrary to the article. I've
    been running the engineering team at a startup for 3 years now
    and our app is still 100% cordova. We passed 100k actives over
    a year ago.There are many benefits to native apps from the
    experience polish to the community and resources surrounding
    them. There are 2 major negatives to native: dev time and
    cost.The Native vs Cordova/SomethingElse discussion is going to
    have different answers depending on your use case. Let me
    restate that for importance. Your use case will dictate which
    is "correct" early on.For us, the rapid product tests we were
    looking to run, in both web and mobile platforms with a very
    small engineering team all but required a cordova app. As our
    product has grown more mature, and major client features change
    less frequent, the appeal of native has grown. But despite that
    appeal, we remain firmly in cordova and will for at least
    another 6 months.
 
  username223 - 1 hours ago
  I think this page completely embodies your core values and
  primary onboarding flows.  It should be your homepage.
 
danielskogly - 31 minutes ago
This evening we got our 171st user for our wishlist-service. When
we launched it 1 year ago we tried to get it out on different
channels like Reddit and HN without much success, while we _did_
see success in just talking about it to friends and family, and had
just over 100 users in January this year.Since then, we've done
close to zero marketing, and it's been amazing to see new signups,
wishlists and items being created - seemingly out of the blue. I
made a simple Slack-bot to post those events to a channel with
their ID, and these are the stats from it was added late March
until now: 53 new users, 74 new wishlists, and 482 new items.As we
do no sort of analytics, we have no clue who these people are, but
boy does it make me happy to see those "A new user was just
created!"-messages nonetheless!
 
  adventured - 16 minutes ago
  I have a suggestion for wishy (if you're not doing this already
  of course).Extract out the most popular items that people are
  sharing (no identifying information connected, only extract out
  super items that you can identify well, like "Wonder Woman on blu
  ray"), or similarly build your own curated lists based on what's
  popular right now (eg a new PS4 game). Build some categories that
  they belong to ("video games" or "clothing"). Then enable people
  to quickly browse for things within those segments to add to
  their wish lists. It should boost wishlist item adding
  substantially over time and give people new ideas. You could also
  build a gently curated top 10 or 20 item list in a given week or
  month (manually reviewed for potentially inappropriate items).
  You can track various metrics for what's moving socially right
  now for a link/item to get an improved idea on what matters to
  provide some further ranking (eg facebook sharing acceleration or
  deceleration).
 
  annekate - 25 minutes ago
  You can't get from 0 to 100k without passing through 171 first.
  :) Congrats and good luck!
 
    danielskogly - 8 minutes ago
    Very true! :) Thank you, and likewise - pretty sure there's
    more than 100k information-hungry parents out there, so
    wouldn't be surprised to see the "100k to 500k"-post in the not
    too distant future!
 
    quickthrower2 - 6 minutes ago
    Maybe you can if you get multiple users sign up at once :-)
 
mkalygin - 28 minutes ago
This is very interesting strategy. Thanks for the good
article.Could you elaborate on the content-growth strategy? I'm
really curious since in some business ideas I'm usually stuck with
"chicken and egg" kind of problem. I believe there is no universal
strategy here, but what worked for you except this special
onboarding flow for users in new markets?
 
  annekate - 15 minutes ago
  It's in the article. Provide the supply yourself (content) while
  you build demand (users). Do things that don't scale.One specific
  example is that we saw a lot of demand for information on child
  care, so we researched over 5000 local daycares & preschools and
  created very comprehensive pages for all of them. This sounds
  like a lot of work but it actually wasn't that bad. Once we had
  done that we were instantly the best place in the SF Bay Area to
  research daycares and find open spaces. Word spread like wildfire
  and we climbed the Google rankings quickly as well. Now, we no
  longer have to collect data manually, because the daycare
  providers come to us to reach their audience of customers. So it
  delivered growth on both sides of the network in a sustainable,
  ongoing fashion, and only required a one-time upfront investment
  in content creation.
 
    mkalygin - 8 minutes ago
    Got it. So it was mostly manual investigation and content
    generation at first, and then users started to add their own
    content. Great, thanks for the answer.
 
dboreham - 1 hours ago
"Relying on push notifications alone"Yeah no. Apps using push
notification for marketing/dark purposes is super irritating and
for that reason I block notifications by default from all apps.
 
  annekate - 40 minutes ago
  Funnily enough, we also sort of failed to capitalize on push. We
  didn't even ask for push permissions in the first version of our
  app! Eventually we found the right push product for our users,
  but it's still the case that a lot of people have them off by
  default or prefer to be contacted by email.