GOPHERSPACE.DE - P H O X Y
gophering on hngopher.com
HN Gopher Feed (2017-12-12) - page 1 of 10
 
___________________________________________________________________
SEC Shuts Down Munchee ICO
300 points by LearnerHerzog
https://techcrunch.com/2017/12/12/sec-shuts-down-munchee-ico/
___________________________________________________________________
 
azernik - 6 hours ago
Related to this bigger HN submission from yesterday ("Statement on
Cryptocurrencies and Initial Coin Offerings"):
https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=15902054That statement was
released on the same day as the Munchee decision, and the Munchee
decision is linked from the statementContext (the Munchee decision
is in footnote 6): "I urge market professionals, including
securities lawyers, accountants and consultants, to read closely
the investigative report we released earlier this year (the ?21(a)
Report?)[5] and review our subsequent enforcement actions.[6]"
 
elmar - 6 hours ago
What about CryptoKitties? is it a security using the "Howey Test"?
 
  Buttes - 4 hours ago
  I'd say they're more like trading cards than anything.
 
  RexetBlell - 6 hours ago
  Yes, because they pay dividends in the form of new baby crypto
  cats.
 
    shawabawa3 - 6 hours ago
    That's not how it works.The kitty tokens are more like a
    product than a security I think as each kitty token is unique,
    but I'm not a lawyer
 
      joering2 - 5 hours ago
      That's considered collectibles.Take this difference, for
      example: if you buy a collectible Ford Shelby GT from 1964
      and you pay 10x more what the previous owner paid, you do so
      with hopes that its a good investment into collectible that
      eventually someone will give you a better price in the
      future. Your asumption/feeling of security (hence name
      "securities" btw) is not guaranteed by anything more than
      hope that someone will eventually pay more (they never may be
      such person).Meanwhile if you buy Ford stock with the same
      purpose of re-selling it later down the road for hopefully
      higher price, you are being reassured aka "secured" by the
      company financial standing, their technical analyze, current
      market value, future strategy for the corp, etc. If these are
      phony then hopefully/supposedly SEC steps in to protect you
      from what most likely will turn out to be scam. Collectibles
      (genuine one of course) do not come with guarantee/security
      that their current value (what you personally gave for) will
      remain in the future, or be repriced higher.
 
        SilasX - 4 hours ago
        Thank you for the explanation -- I was wondering how
        securities law is written to exempt the classic-Ford case,
        when "investors" expect a gain in value that isn't e.g.
        related to dividends but rather popularity quirks.  Your
        distinction makes sense.
 
          joering2 - 4 hours ago
          You welcome!
 
  stale2002 - 5 hours ago
  No. Crypto kitties exists right now. They aren't using the money
  to fund future development. They aren't making promises about
  what the money will be used for. What you see is what you get.
 
  whataretensors - 5 hours ago
  It's almost as if they shouldn't be using a test invented in the
  40s on new technology.
 
thisisit - 6 hours ago
> In short, Munchee was undone by two things: depending on the
token sale as a vehicle to raise cash for operations and using the
typically spammy and scammy marketing efforts most ICO floggers use
now, tactics taken directly from affiliate marketing handbooks.It
seems that most ICO do both the things. If not a self-inflicting
post about the token growth but at least the raising cash for
operations part.
 
  pm90 - 5 hours ago
  > It seems that most ICO do both the things.That doesn't make it
  OK. I think what's happening here is that ICO's are raising large
  enough funding to finally warrant involvement by the SEC.
 
option_greek - 5 hours ago
I don't get how the SEC differentiates between ICOs and
kickstarters (not considering the ICOs that promise their token
value to increase over time). How can there be any kind of
innovation in fund raising space if the SEC wants every thing to be
registered as securities. What bugs me the most is that many ICOs
are funded by virtual currencies (btc or eth) and still SEC
considers it self to have jurisdiction over the transactions that
grown-up individuals do. Instead of considering $1mil net worth
investors are accredited, SEC should have a certification test that
an individual can take to prove he understands finance. If someone
has $1mil, it doesn't prove a damn thing. It could very well be
that they inherited it or won in a lottery.
 
  proaralyst - 5 hours ago
  I think it's because ICOs give you a tradeable token; kickstarter
  contributions cannot be traded for profit.
 
    option_greek - 5 hours ago
    Contributors can as well sell their future orders as backorders
    on ebay or amazon or directly. Many successful kickstarters had
    their products sold at much higher prices after they are
    received (mainly the early bird ones).
 
      tptacek - 4 hours ago
      If the marketer of a Kickstarter promoted their product as an
      investment-grade asset, they could indeed have legal
      problems. People forget that a big chunk of what the SEC is
      concerned about is marketing and promotion.
 
      justrobert - 5 hours ago
      In that case, the original buyer is the one who is receiving
      the goods and then sending to their counterparty.
 
  matthewaveryusa - 5 hours ago
  I'm relatively ignorant but I think it's a matter of fungibility.
 
  zemo - 5 hours ago
  when you back a kickstarter you don't receive a store of value
  that you can re-sell to another party. That's a vague statement
  to be sure; you could say the same thing about beanie babies, for
  example. But Ty did not sell beanie babies to people under the
  auspices of resale value. Therein lies the rub: the crime is not
  in selling a thing that has value that can be resold (since that
  describes all property), it's advertising your product as an
  investment vehicle.
 
  austenallred - 5 hours ago
  Well kickstarters aren?t securities, while many coins are. That?s
  a pretty straight forward distinction. And the SEC has
  jurisdiction if some part of the transaction or company is in the
  United States. Also pretty simple.
 
  dabockster - 4 hours ago
  > How can there be any kind of innovation in fund raising space
  if the SEC wants every thing to be registered as securities?That
  regulation protects the layman who doesn't know that an ICO is a
  glorified trust.
 
  delinka - 5 hours ago
  I believe Kickstarter projects are "pre-orders" and not
  investment instruments.
 
  slg - 5 hours ago
  >and still SEC considers it self to have jurisdiction over the
  transactions that grown-up individuals do.Umm, isn't that the
  entire purpose of the SEC or even more broadly the purpose of all
  contract, finance, and commerce laws?  Just because someone is
  moving bits around instead of pieces of paper doesn't mean the
  law doesn't apply to them.
 
  dragonwriter - 4 hours ago
  > SEC considers it self to have jurisdiction over the
  transactions that grown-up individuals do.The SEC considers
  itself to have such authority because the laws passed by Congress
  explicitly give it that authority. If you have a problem with
  that authority existing in the SEC, your complaint should be
  directed at Congress, not the SEC?s factually accurate belief in
  the existence of its legal authority.
 
emodendroket - 4 hours ago
It's about time.
 
vasilipupkin - 5 hours ago
why is ethereum itself not a security by this logic.  Clearly the
purpose of buying ETH in the ICO was appreciation, no?
 
  bluesign - 4 hours ago
  as long as they don't promote 'increase in value' and 'gain on
  your investment' they are safe.
 
    vasilipupkin - 3 hours ago
    but did they not make any statements implying an increase in
    value?  why would you have participated in ETH ICO if you
    didn't expect an increase in value?
 
      bluesign - 2 hours ago
      You can expect increase in the value, actually even everybody
      can expect, but as long as there is no marketing of increase
      in value, or misdirection it is fair game.If you are
      investing in real estate, you have an expectation in increase
      in value, but if the real estate agent is promising you,
      increase in the value, and promising you to do the all
      marketing, etc and selling part. Then it is something
      else.The point is basically intentionally misleading
      investor.
 
        vasilipupkin - 2 hours ago
        where in the howey test does it say anything about
        marketing?It is an investment of money There is an
        expectation of profits from the investment The investment
        of money is in a common enterprise Any profit comes from
        the efforts of a promoter or third party
 
PatientTrades - 6 hours ago
The hype will die down as the SEC gets involved and regulations are
pursued. Smart time to take profits in my opinion. Many will be
left holding the bag as we see a correction to more sustainable
levels. Bitcoin is here to stay, but these prices are not rational,
driven purely off of emotion.
 
elmar - 5 hours ago
What Is the Howey Test? - FindLawhttp://consumer.findlaw.com
/securities-law/what-is-the-howey..."The final factor of the Howey
Test concerns whether any profit that comes from the investment is
largely or wholly outside of the investor's control. If so, then
the investment might be a security. If, however, the investor's own
actions largely dictate whether an investment will be profitable,
then that investment is probably not a security."Howey Test
https://youtu.be/9lTS1Zofw8w
 
  delinka - 5 hours ago
  This seems, to me (a layman), to indicate that most any ICO will
  fall under "security." Can anyone provide an example where an ICO
  would not be a security as defined by the Howey Test?
 
    oskarth - 2 hours ago
    Interestingly, cash would seem to be a security under this
    definition. Except it is explicitly exempted:> The term
    ??security?? means any note, stock, treasury stock, security
    future, security-based swap, bond, debenture, certificate of
    interest or participation in any profit-sharing agreement or in
    any oil, gas, or other mineral royalty or lease, any
    collateral-trust certificate, preorganization certificate or
    subscription, transferable share, investment contract, voting-
    trust certificate, certificate of deposit for a security, any
    put, call, straddle, option, or privilege on any security,
    certificate of deposit, or group or index of securities
    (including any interest therein or based on the value thereof),
    or any put, call, straddle, option, or privilege entered into
    on a national securities exchange relating to foreign currency,
    or in general, any instrument commonly known as a ??security??;
    or any certificate of interest or participation in, temporary
    or interim certificate for, receipt for, or warrant or right to
    subscribe to or purchase, any of the foregoing; but shall not
    include currency or any note, draft, bill of exchange, or
    banker?s acceptance which has a maturity at the time of
    issuance of not exceeding nine months, exclusive of days of
    grace, or any renewal thereof the maturity of which is likewise
    limited.From The Securities Exchange Act of 1934 (N.B.
    IANAL).So, will cryptocurrencies, possibly including ICOs, be
    exempted? Only history will tell.
 
      munk-a - 2 hours ago
      I wonder if you were to declare an intent to establish a new
      nation in the Antarctic (say by purchasing some of Chile's
      land) and to fund raise for fees associated with this new
      nation you offered to sell people dollars of your soon-to-be
      currency at some fixed price below the expected value, would
      the SEC disapprove of such an action?(assuming it was
      actually done in good faith and not discernibly a scam)
 
        cptaj - 1 hours ago
        The SEC would not have any jurisdiction there.
 
          azernik - 1 hours ago
          If you're doing the fund-raising in the US, they would
          absolutely have jurisdiction.
 
      lallysingh - 1 hours ago
      We'll probably need better criteria for what's actually a
      proper crypto 'currency' vs 'security' vs whatever else
      first.
 
      stale2002 - 2 hours ago
      Nobody is saying that crytocurrencies 'in general' are going
      to be declared securities.This is about ICOs. IE, a tokens
      that are a 'FUTURE' promise for something that doesn't exist
      yet.If Bitcoin was a security, the statement from the SEC
      head would be very different.
 
        oskarth - 2 hours ago
        > Nobody is saying that crytocurrencies 'in general' are
        going to be declared securities.I agree with you, but the
        fact is plenty of people do. Maybe not in the corner of the
        world, but look broader. This also wasn't the point.
 
        [deleted]
 
    michwill - 2 hours ago
    I don't think you're right. Under this impression, most of
    cryptocurrencies are securities. However, SEC said, they're
    not: https://twitter.com/mikebutcher/status/940487575491497985
 
      Alex3917 - 2 hours ago
      "It has been asserted", i.e. that assertion is false and most
      ICOs are securities.
 
        [deleted]
 
        michwill - 40 minutes ago
        https://www.technologyreview.com/the-download/609756/as-
        it-t...
 
    TDL - 3 hours ago
    The SEC Chairman released a statement this morning about
    cryptos & ICOs.  There is a mention of how an ICO can fall
    outside of the securities designation in the
    memo.https://www.sec.gov/news/public-statement/statement-
    clayton-...
 
      Sangermaine - 1 hours ago
      The Chairman just reiterates what's long been the case in
      securities law: whether an ICO, like any other instrument, is
      a security depends on the facts of the case.
 
    jMyles - 5 hours ago
    Imagine it's a network-connected resource like server time or
    file hosting.  Those aren't securities right?So now just
    imagine a token that has the same functionality.You receive a
    token that does something useful.  Do you use that token
    wisely?  Or do you make bad business decisions?There are tokens
    that people are buying to use, not just to HODL.
 
      yazaddaruvala - 4 hours ago
      Imagine a piece of paper. Like what you'd find in a notebook.
      Those aren't assets right?So now just imagine a token that
      has the same functionality.You receive a token, it's made of
      paper like the notebook but does something useful.Should that
      token, the piece of paper be regulated? Lol yes, it's now
      money! And all other assets or securities are regulated.
 
        debacle - 4 hours ago
        Paper has utility outside of its value. Most coins do not.
 
          crankylinuxuser - 2 hours ago
          I'd counter specifically with Ethereum or Filecoin.They
          both represent either computation-time or file-storage-
          and-bandwidth time.Ethereum could easily represent time
          on a distributed AWS Lambda. And FileCoin can represent
          an AWS S3 storage.It just so happens that they both are
          also cryptocoin.It gets even uglier that the turning-like
          machine in Ethereum/Solidity also exists, kind of, in
          Bitcoin. In fact it was because it worked in Bitcoin they
          developed Ethereum. So technically even Bitcoin can do
          processing work. Makes everything a bit murkier to be
          honest.
 
          debacle - 2 hours ago
          You're not countering anything. I'm aware of both. The
          SEC is going to have to decide if these coins having
          utilities makes up their value.These aren't new concepts.
          People have been trying to get around regulation for
          thousands of years.
 
        hobbyjogger - 4 hours ago
        Why do you not consider paper to be an asset?Pretty much
        anything that can be bought and sold is an asset. Yes, that
        includes notebooks and paper.
 
        gamblor956 - 4 hours ago
        Your metaphor doesn't make sense. Are you saying that the
        token lets me write on it and make toy airplanes? Because
        if so, then the token wouldn't be regulated...If you're
        saying that the piece of paper represents ownership of
        something, then the paper is most likely a security or
        derivative, in which case it is already subject to
        regulation.  A token with the same functionality as this
        piece of paper would be regulated, and vice versa...
 
      tptacek - 4 hours ago
      Which is it? Is it that these tokens aren't really
      investments, but rather utility instruments people are buying
      to obtain restaurant reviews? Or is it that it's so unfair
      that the SEC requires these kinds of companies to register
      before selling to the public like everyone else? It looks to
      me like your argument is oscillating a bit.
 
        jMyles - 4 hours ago
        Well, the exciting part might be that the line between
        investment and utility instrument is blurring.  It seems to
        me that these two categories needn't be separated by a
        bright-line.
 
          tptacek - 4 hours ago
          A particular instrument might blur the lines in terms of
          how it's packaged and promoted, but the underlying
          activities aren't blurry at all. People who acquire an
          asset in the hopes that its price will rise so they can
          resell it on a secondary market are speculating
          ("investing"), full stop.Obviously, this isn't the first
          time we've had offerings ostensibly taking these forms.
          People used to buy comic books in the hopes of their
          appreciation. Ty sold Beanie Babies to people who were
          stockpiling them for eBay.The reason Ty didn't get in
          trouble, but Munchee did, was that Ty was never stupid
          enough to record videos extolling the once-in-a-lifetime
          opportunity people had to 9x their investment in
          restaurant review coupons. Again: a very significant
          component of the SEC's concern is about marketing and
          promotion.
 
          stale2002 - 1 hours ago
          Are you arguing that beanie babies and comic books are
          securities? How about bars of gold?They are certainly
          speculation. But I doubt the SEC would ever claim that
          literal bars of gold (not notes, physical bars of gold)
          are securities.
 
          tptacek - 1 hours ago
          They are not, but the reason they are not is instructive.
 
      gamblor956 - 4 hours ago
      If the coin represents ownership of a resource (or a right to
      a resource), it can be a security (though it might be a
      derivative instead, governed by a similar but entirely
      separate set of rules).Being a security does not mean it
      can't also be something useful; it just means that the
      security aspects of it are potentially subject to securities
      laws.EDIT: Beanie babies aren't securities because you
      actually the beanie baby.  However, a piece of paper
      entitling you to ownership of a beanie baby could be a
      security.
 
        michwill - 3 hours ago
        All right, but if the coin is inseparable part of the
        resource, it cannot be a security. There is a thin line
        here.Imagine a coin securitizing Bitcoin miners ("cloud
        mining coin"). Yes, that's a security.Now imagine Ethereum.
        It was ICO'd, talking in today's terms. Is it a security?
        (hint: SEC just admitted it's not)
 
          Animats - 2 hours ago
          The SEC's position on the DAO was that they were not
          going to apply their guidance retroactively to that one.
          Going forward, though, they're cracking down.
 
          joosters - 1 hours ago
          Where did the SEC say the ethereum ICO wasn't a sale of
          securities?
 
          gamblor956 - 2 hours ago
          All right, but if the coin is inseparable part of the
          resource, it cannot be a security. There is a thin line
          here.True, but then you're limited to things which can be
          stored in a blockstream in the space allocated to a
          single coin.  There aren't many useful resources that
          could fit into that space, even fewer that would
          scale.Now imagine Ethereum. It was ICO'd, talking in
          today's terms. Is it a security? (hint: SEC just admitted
          it's not)Unless there is something about Ethereum that
          I'm not aware of, it does not represent any sort of
          ownership interest in another asset, it is the asset.
 
    nostrademons - 4 hours ago
    A pure payment system within an app.  Say that someone builds a
    social network that lets you easily get in touch with people
    who have need of skills that you possess.  They then introduce
    a token system - call it "karma", maybe - that you can grant to
    people who perform good deeds for you, and then if your karma
    is positive, you can grant it to others in exchange for favors
    or services.  Since you only receive karma for actions you
    perform and it doesn't rise in value based on the efforts of
    the social network, it's not a security.  It is a currency,
    however, and could fall afoul of laws governing currencies.BTW,
    a number of games successfully have things like this, eg.
    Linden dollars in Second Life, gold in WoW, or tokens in
    FarmVille.
 
      tonysdg - 3 hours ago
      Isn't that exactly how bounties work on the StackExchange
      websites?
 
      philipodonnell - 3 hours ago
      > Since you only receive karma for actions you performThat
      wouldn't really be an ICO, though, right? You have to be able
      to convert it back and forth between another currency, not
      just "earning" it through use of the software to be spent
      only there and never changing hands.
 
        detaro - 2 hours ago
        You could bootstrap initial distribution through an ICO
        (e.g. if people need an initial stock to be able to
        distribute it to others). And e.g. in-game currency
        commonly can be bought, but not sold through official
        channels.
 
    paulmd - 3 hours ago
    >  This seems, to me (a layman), to indicate that most any ICO
    will fall under "security."Pretty much, yes.  Securities are
    defined very broadly in the US.Why does it surprise you that
    these are securities?  They very obviously are selling a
    security to investors, who are purchasing it because they
    expect the price to increase.  Open-and-shut case.The fact that
    there's crypto involved is irrelevant.It really sounds like
    people are trying to pretend these laws don't apply because
    they disagree with the laws in question.  Which is fine, but
    let's not pretend like there's any ambiguity here, because
    there's not.  It's extremely clear that almost all ICOs are
    securities, and if you asked a lawyer I'm 100% sure that's what
    they would tell you.
 
      michwill - 3 hours ago
      You're not correct. I think, less than 50% of ICOs are not
      securities. But the way to prove is exactly this: ask a
      lawyer
 
        dc_gregory - 28 minutes ago
        I think if you hold a non-obvious position like this, it'd
        be great to explain your reasoning. I am def. curious as to
        what you think here!
 
    elmar - 5 hours ago
    I would dare to say that even Ethereum and some other alt-coins
    should be considered securities using this test.
 
      anonymous5133 - 5 hours ago
      Most are. Thats why it is so important that crypto startups
      leave the usa to be outside the jurisdiction of the sec.
 
        shafyy - 5 hours ago
        Do you think it's better for the economy overall if they
        are not regulated by the SEC?
 
        jmalicki - 3 hours ago
        Sometimes they're commodities, not securities, depending on
        the particulars of the transaction (still regulated, just a
        different set of regulations)https://www.coindesk.com/cftc-
        no-inconsistency-sec-cryptocur...
 
        vkou - 4 hours ago
        Most countries have securities laws that are similar to
        those of the United States.It's arguably easier to be in
        compliance in a single market of 350 million people, then
        in multiple markets, each governed by their own laws.
 
        krrrh - 4 hours ago
        There?s an assumption being made that the SEC has a vastly
        different way of looking at investor protection than
        securities regulators in other jusrisdicions. I?m sure
        there will be some regulatory arbitrage going on, but if an
        ICO is a security it doesn?t make it automatically illegal,
        it just means they have to follow rules established that
        are mostly there to legally bind the organization to
        disclose information to investors and follow certain
        governance standards.Some jurisdictions also don?t require
        normal stock offerings to follow rules as strict as the SEC
        does. It doesn?t stop the US from having many of the
        largest stock markets in the world, and a very high level
        of public participation in equity investing.
 
        gamblor956 - 4 hours ago
        It wouldn't matter if they're located outside the US. The
        SEC has jurisdiction over all securities that are sold to
        US persons, and most countries where you'd want to be
        located have similar laws.
 
      tptacek - 5 hours ago
      Sure, they could be.
 
  motbob - 5 hours ago
  That quote is slightly misstated. It makes it sound like gold
  bars would be securities (since any profit from reselling gold
  would be "largely or wholly outside of the investor's control"
  since the market for gold is so large and relatively
  volatile).Rather than asking whether the potential profit is
  outside of the investor's control, the question is whether the
  profit is within the control of some other person or group.The
  example that sticks in my mind is the idea that fruit trees can
  be securities if they are maintained and harvested by non-
  investors and the fruit sale profits go to the investors.
 
    jdmichal - 2 hours ago
    The fruit tree itself would not be the security. It's the thing
    which gives the investors the right to their share of profits
    which would be the security. Or, in other words, a security
    secures your right of ownership to something else. In a
    company, we typically call those things "shares". You either
    own the tree directly, or you hold a security which secures
    your right of ownership of the tree.So, if you own gold, you
    don't own a security. You own the actual gold, and that chunk
    of metal does not secure ownership of any other item. It can be
    exchanged, of course, for ownership of something else, but
    that's a function of its value as an object. Now, if you own a
    share of a gold ETF, that is a security that describes your
    rights to some chunk of metal.
 
  elmar - 1 hours ago
  On the video "Howey Test" the most interesting part for me is at
  the end (2:55)https://youtu.be/9lTS1Zofw8w?t=175Where if no
  single person or group is in charge, and decisions are taken by
  all, is no longer considered a security. This little detail makes
  the difference from security to not a security.
 
mrwong - 6 hours ago
Thats a good thing, more companies will leave US Jurisdictions
faster to take advantage of the funding liquidity the open Token
markets provide.Just like Mathematicians and Engineers were leaving
the soviet union in droves to pursuit a better future.
 
  ceejayoz - 6 hours ago
  These rules aren't new in the slightest. Anyone who thought ICOs
  would allow them to evade the SEC was always deluding
  themselves.Despite these long-standing rules, the US still seems
  to do just fine attracting new corporations.
 
  bunderbunder - 6 hours ago
  Most these companies are very clearly focusing on a US market
  first, so their pool of likely coin buyers is Americans. I'm
  guessing that many of them also want to keep the option of
  getting additional rounds of funding by selling equity rather
  than scrip.If leaving US jurisdiction reduces the capital markets
  that are most important to them, then I doubt they will decide
  that it's worthwhile to do so just for the sake of being able do
  ICOs.
 
  hyprCoin - 6 hours ago
  I don't think this is a good thing.  We are going to lose some of
  the brightest next generation startups to lesser jurisdiction
  areas due to regulation created in the 40s.I really do not care
  for the accredited investor scam.
 
    s73ver_ - 5 hours ago
    The JOBS Act changed some of those thresholds. However, there
    is exactly zero reason why the reporting and transparency
    regulations should be thrown out, regardless of whether you're
    doing a paper security or a crypto coin.
 
      hyprCoin - 5 hours ago
      Why should a global decentralized currency be beholden to
      local regulation?I guess the lesson is to do a fair launch
      and run nicehash to control a large percentage of the
      network.  Then you don't have to abide by SEC regulation as
      the coin does not represent a centralized organization.
 
        s73ver_ - 1 hours ago
        I've not heard any reason why these ICOs are any different
        than any other security. Simply being "on a computer" never
        should have been enough for patents, and it most definitely
        isn't enough here.
 
          hyprCoin - 1 hours ago
          Look at chain coin.  A crypto currency that was a scam
          coin, people lost a lot of money and the original
          developer dumped his supply.It did not die, different
          people are now picking up the chain and making it a more
          valuable currency.The point is not that these currencies
          are "on a computer", the point is that they represent a
          collective interest that lives beyond borders.
 
          s73ver_ - 1 hours ago
          And why couldn't that happen without the scam component?
 
          hyprCoin - 1 hours ago
          It likely wouldn't exist without the scam component.  The
          original developer never intended to follow through with
          his vision, but it was a good enough vision that many
          people decided it was worth investing in and working
          towards.My point was that there are regularization
          factors in the market that exist without a centralized
          organization rubber stamping actions.  Of course, that
          doesn't fit the narrative that people, especially the
          poor and intelligent, must be protected from themselves.
 
        PeterisP - 4 hours ago
        A local currency should be beholden to local regulation.A
        global decentralized currency should be beholden to every
        local regulation in which it is used, since the users fall
        under that jurisdiction - if it's not compatible with local
        regulation, then it should stay away from that locality and
        the people there.In particular, ICOs should care about USA
        regulation if they want to attract money from people in
        USA; they can freely ignore SEC iff they keep their
        activities outside of USA and don't attempt to market their
        "investment" to customers in USA.
 
        eropple - 4 hours ago
        > Why should a global decentralized currency be beholden to
        local regulation?Because people, who are the important
        factor here and not your burnt CPU cycles, live in those
        localities and have generally agreed to live in this thing
        called "society" where regulations are made within that
        society's jurisdiction.
 
        chickenfries - 3 hours ago
        > Why should a global decentralized currency be beholden to
        local regulation?I dunno why can't you declare your house
        an independent country and live under your own rules?
 
    orthecreedence - 4 hours ago
    If it means people who welcome scams with open arms all go off
    to an island somewhere, then yes this is a good thing.I love
    how quickly people forget history then come crying to daddy
    government when they get the paddling they so richly deserve
    from a silver tongue devil who parted them with their money.
 
  JumpCrisscross - 6 hours ago
  You post a variant of this drivel on every regulatory- or China-
  related thread [1].[1]
  https://news.ycombinator.com/threads?id=mrwong
 
    mrwong - 4 hours ago
    So what?
 
      JumpCrisscross - 4 hours ago
      > So what?You're shouting baseless opinion. Over its
      repetitions, moderated [1] and  well-cited [2] responses [3]
      have been repeatedly [4] levied against it [5]. Yet the
      outburst never changes. You're talking for the sake of
      talking, not to discuss.[1]
      https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=15791135[2]
      https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=15766911[3]
      https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=15791454[4]
      https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=15791143[5]
      https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=15766440
 
        [deleted]
 
          chickenfries - 3 hours ago
          if you can?t make your point without personal attacks I?m
          not going to be very persuaded.
 
  pmarreck - 5 hours ago
  "Regulation is damage and the Internet will route around it"
 
philfrasty - 6 hours ago
?Munchee was able to return all $15 million to the 40
investors...?Is this number correct? 40? 375.000$ on average seems
unlikely...
 
  albertgoeswoof - 4 hours ago
  Probably, this is one reason why a lot of the ICOs are being
  scrutinised.A small number of investors buy up the tokens, the
  ICO then sells out in record time and looks like it?s some kind
  of amazing hot tech.As soon as the tokens become tradeable, the
  value is immediately several times higher (due to the hype) and
  the original investors cash out a large portion of their
  investment.Due to the immense amount of capital they can then
  rinse and repeat on every token sale and spread out their
  portfolio across the entire crypto space. If a token does
  skyrocket they?re invested enough to still profit.
 
  fludlight - 6 hours ago
  They probably had a lead investor who put in $10m, two or three
  who put in $1m, and so on.  The last 20 probably contributed less
  than $20k each.
 
  oh_sigh - 5 hours ago
  A lot of people have a ton of btc and don't really view it as
  real money
 
  igorgue - 6 hours ago
  Decentraland probably had 2 investors, Tezos god knows... So yeah
  it's not that unheard off in the ICO market.
 
  pcmonk - 3 hours ago
  The article is very misleading here.  The cease-and-desist letter
  is clearer[0].  They intended to raise $15 million, but the SEC
  stopped them within a day of their ICO launch, when they had only
  raised about $60,000[0]
  https://www.sec.gov/litigation/admin/2017/33-10445.pdf Fact 27
 
rthomas6 - 2 hours ago
These rules will only apply to companies within the jurisdiction of
the SEC, correct? Hypothetically, I don't see how the SEC could
shut down ICOs from companies registered outside the US, even from
Americans.
 
  itake - 2 hours ago
  companies run into problems if American citizens "invest" in
  them.
 
zachruss92 - 1 hours ago
Honestly, i'm kind of annoyed by everyone offering an ICO for
[insert irrelevant product here]. It's creating a misleading
advertising scheme built on top of a current tech _craze_ that will
likely leave a lot of "investors" out of money.The problem is that
you're giving money to a relatively unknown company while
speculating that the company will create inherent value. Unlike
with stocks, you don't have ownership in the company or any voting
rights. There is nothing stopping the company's creators from
distributing the ICO money to themselves (there might be a board,
but since the company isn't public who knows who the board is).In
this case the SEC is right to step in so there aren't a ton of
unregulated securities going around and a lot of consumers
potentially getting screwed.Even with cryptocurrencies like
Bitcoin, it can be scary. You're literally getting into the ForEx
market, which is known to be one of the riskiest markets in
existence. With other currencies, at least they're backed by a
government that (at least at least attempts) to regulate it's value
and protect it from manipulation. With bitcoin, I saw that 40% of
all coins in existence are owned by less that 1,000 people. How do
we know that the current price inflations aren't a manipulation (or
collusion) to jack up the price, sell for USD, then crash the
market? It's not illegal/collusion because Bitcoin isn't
regulated.This is definitely a rant, but I have some serious
concerns as to where this market is going. Would love to hear
other's thoughts.
 
  Hermel - 1 hours ago
  ICOs are in a hype. But there is real value. First, they can be
  used to bypass a lot of (but not all) regulation. This is good,
  because the financial sector is overly regulated (and wrongly
  regulated). Second, there are applications that are not possible
  in the traditional financial system. For example, the smart
  contracts behind the Bancor system (another overvalued ICO)
  provide automated market-making on the blockchain. These smart
  contracts have a capital buffer no one can touch and that is used
  for completely transparent market making, thereby ensuring that
  you can always buy or sell shares. I won't go into detail, but it
  basically solves the liquidity problem for penny stocks.In the
  medium run, I see ICOs as a light-weight alternative to IPOs, but
  not as a seed-funding instrument. This is non-sense.
 
    workthrowaway27 - 1 hours ago
    The SEC isn't going to let them be used to bypass regulation.
 
    Sangermaine - 1 hours ago
    >First, they can be used to bypass a lot of (but not all)
    regulation.It's entertaining that many seem to believe this for
    no apparent reason, but the SEC (and other regulators around
    the world) doesn't seem to agree.
 
    exelius - 1 hours ago
    Agreed there is real value, but creating a shadow banking
    system that is governed by unregulated actors isn't the
    solution. What's to stop a sophisticated bad actor like say,
    North Korea from manipulating cryptocoin markets in order to
    scam a bunch of Americans out of US Dollars? I know there is
    some belief that they're behind the recent Bitcoin rally...
 
  Obi_Juan_Kenobi - 1 hours ago
  You mean an ICO that operates in an extremely competitive market,
  has no product to speak of, and doesn't leverage decentralized
  networks in any way, shape, or form isn't a good investment?  Who
  would have thought?!> that 40% of all coins in existence are
  owned by less that 1,000 peopleThat was a terrible piece of
  reporting.  The reality is that 1000 addresses hold about 40% of
  coins.  Addresses are not identities; one person can have as many
  addresses as they want, and businesses (like exchanges) may have
  a single address that holds the vast majority of their cold
  storage.  The upshot is that we don't know how well Bitcoin is
  distributed.Some of those large addresses are exchanges, and are
  indicated as such on many sites, or held by institutions.  They
  hold large amounts of coin, yet represent the holdings of
  thousands of individuals.  There are also several large addresses
  that are very similar (i.e. each containing a given number of
  coinbase rewards) and are very likely to be held by a single
  early miner.  There are also some number of "Satoshi" coins held
  by the creator of Bitcoin.  Some estimate that Satoshi mined
  ~1million coins, though there is nothing definitive about this
  figure.  There are probably at least 100,000.Bitcoin market
  'manipulation' falls into two categories: 'legitimate'
  manipulation that requires buying and selling coins in a bid to
  move market sentiment in their favor, and 'illegitimate'
  manipulation that requires inside knowledge of an exchange, such
  as full view of orderbooks for stop hunting, etc.  The first kind
  exposes the manipulator to significant risk (especially from
  other 'whales', and is far less lucrative than many would
  believe.  For a net gain, they must move the price in the
  opposite direction from their net buys/sells.  The 'illegitimate'
  manipulator can only affect particular exchanges (insider
  trading, or else hacking), and thus you can choose an exchange
  you trust the most.
 
    zachruss92 - 50 minutes ago
    Makes sense about 1000 addresses not 1000 people. I didn't
    consider that.The cold storage aspect is interesting. What
    happens if the drive is corrupted? Can this type of content be
    raid(ed)/duplicated?
 
      ifdefdebug - 45 minutes ago
      drive is irrelevant, as long as you have the private key on a
      piece of paper you can reconstruct your wallet anywhere
 
bluetwo - 3 hours ago
What is the world of blockchain going to look like in a year?
 
jMyles - 5 hours ago
I'm disappointed in us, HackerNews.  A thread about an ICO being
shut down and most people in the thread are luke-warmly celebrating
the SEC.  Is this the compassion, sophisticated society we're
working to build?The SEC, like the rest of the state, is focused on
keeping wealth in the hands of the wealthy.  This action does not
protect anyone's freedom or agency.  Instead, it ensures that the
only people who benefit from good ICOs (and none of us can now know
if Munchee was going to be one) are "accredited investors".  This
is an insidious phrase which simply means "have a net worth of at
least $1,000,000, excluding the value of one's primary
residence."This is just another action to divide-and-conquer by
class.  The internet will not tolerate these hijincks; it will
simply shift economy and influence elsewhere.  But will we?
 
  ryanwaggoner - 4 hours ago
  Instead, it ensures that the only people who benefit from good
  ICOs are accredited investorsIt also ensures that the only people
  who lose money from bad ICOs (the vast, vast majority of them)
  are accredited investors.
 
  cookiecaper - 4 hours ago
  There is a major difference in what people say and what people
  do. It is easy to say "I don't mind losing $10k" when you believe
  that there's a non-negligible chance you will come out with $10M.
  When that $10k gets lost and the $10M never shows up, the tune is
  different. Humans will always deflect blame.When this happens to
  a substantial number of people, the discontent is palpable enough
  to threaten social stability and the civil order. The SEC was
  formed specifically to prevent, mitigate, and respond to such
  incidents before they have the opportunity to escalate.Call this
  what you will and take offense if you must, but the consequences
  of anarchy are not at all as rosy as most "anarcho-capitalists"
  imagine in their thought experiments.
 
  drawkbox - 3 hours ago
  The SEC is one of the US's best institutions.  It was created in
  1933/34 as a reaction to investment/banking scams that led to the
  Great Depression.The Securities Exchange Act of 1934 [1] IS the
  best thing that ever happened to US markets being trustworthy,
  looking out for smaller investors and the meteoric rise of our
  markets since 1934.Yes it is a layer or wall for innovation at
  times, and have failed to catch all fraud/scams at times, but
  overall people should be glad the SEC is there to make sure
  people aren't being taken left and right on investments. The only
  people that are usually dealt a blow from the SEC are
  scammers/sketchy investments. Even if some financial innovation
  is delayed or harder it is always better to be trustworthy than
  not.  The SEC makes US investments trustworthy.[1]
  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Securities_Exchange_Act_of_193...
 
    jMyles - 1 hours ago
    That an agency was necessary when it was created - and that it
    has done good in the intervening time - is not in itself a
    sufficiently compelling reason for it to continue to exist.In
    this particular case, I think it's clear that the SEC (as well
    as the FDA, to which it is being compared throughout this
    thread) will be decreasingly necessary as our species moves
    into the information age.
 
    chickenfries - 3 hours ago
    Thank you. I really get the feeling that the people pleading a
    special case for ICOs are really lacking historical knowledge
    and perspective. They ask questions like "why can't the market
    decide what a trustworthy investment is" like we didn't already
    have a period where that was the case.
 
  tptacek - 4 hours ago
  You can sell stock to anybody. My kids can (and have) bought
  stocks. The SEC is not trying to keep securities out of the hands
  of the little people.Rather, what's happening here is that
  operators of ICOs would like to exempt themselves from the
  disclosure rules that apply to all other publicly traded
  companies. They don't want to register with the SEC. They don't
  want to spend $5k-$10k a quarter on publishing their financials
  (those financials would probably be on the cheaper end of the
  scale, since they'll be disclosing basically no meaningful
  revenue).Congress and the SEC went out of its way to make
  streamlined public trading for new enterprises possible with the
  JOBS act and Title IV. Over a billion dollars of new issuances
  have apparently happened under Title IV's "mini-IPO" rules, which
  exclude the most financially onerous costs of IPO for issuances
  under $50MM (that is: for virtually all ICO-scale raises).Tech
  startups haven't used Title IV because, by and large, they can
  get better deals from venture capitalists. That's not a
  conspiracy; it's simple statistical selection. The best companies
  have access to the most reliable capital. The flip side of that
  coin (no pun intended) is adverse selection, which is what you
  have when a trivial restaurant review application tries to raise
  $15MM on a new cryptocurrency dedicated to funding restaurant
  reviews.ICO enthusiasts want to paint this as retail investors
  being excluded from "10000%" gains. They're betraying themselves
  right there, by arguing with a straight face that there are
  10000% gains to realistically be had by retail investors. Really,
  what they're making is a special-pleading argument: the companies
  they back don't have their shit together enough to raise large
  amounts any other way, and they sure would like to be exempted
  from the rules that apply to everyone else.
 
    paradroid - 4 hours ago
    It says - right there in the SEC statement - that their top
    priority is essentially to protect Main Street.
 
    beering - 4 hours ago
    GP writes specifically about how the SEC "does not protect
    anyone's freedom or agency", which is a typical libertarian
    viewpoint. I.e. that the gov't shouldn't regulate anything
    about disclosures, published financials, etc.E.g. if a company
    wants to sell and promote a new radical weight loss drug, it
    should be up to each individual consumer to decide whether it's
    trustworthy, not the FDA.Not agreeing or disagreeing with this
    line of thinking, but I think you're arguing from a different
    angle.
 
    malvosenior - 4 hours ago
    For me it?s much simpler and more fundamental than that. I
    think people can make their own choices and it?s not the
    state?s place to meddle in those choices. If someone wants to
    get a second mortgage on their house to buy an ICO, I say more
    power to them. Why shouldn?t people be able to take risks
    they?re comfortable with? Some of those risks might pay off.
    Regardless, even if it was the equivalent of flushing money
    down the toilet, I don?t see it as anyone?s right to interfere
    with that personal sovereignty.
 
      pjc50 - 4 hours ago
      > Why shouldn?t people be able to [invest in pyramid
      schemes]https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Albanian_Civil_War"The
      Albanian Civil War, also known as the Albanian rebellion,
      Albanian unrest or the Pyramid crisis, was a period of civil
      disorder in Albania in 1997, sparked by Ponzi scheme
      failures. The government was toppled and more than 2,000
      people were killed."
 
        malvosenior - 4 hours ago
        All meaningful progress comes with some risk. You can argue
        that the status quo is worth preserving but some of us will
        never agree with that.
 
      tptacek - 4 hours ago
      Why can't people make their own choices and purchase any
      cancer drugs they choose, regardless of whether the FDA has
      vetted them at ludicrous expense?Why can't people make their
      own choices and buy poultry off the back of a van rather than
      from an FDA-inspected distribution chain?Why can't people
      make their own choices and dine at restaurants that can offer
      lower prices in exchange for not undergoing inspections, or,
      for that matter, city building code inspections? Believe it
      or not: having invested in more than one local food venture,
      those expenses are intimidating and a blocking issue.You can
      believe all regulations are pointless and that the market
      would handle those issues better than the state. I don't
      agree, but you'll have an intellectually coherent
      argument.Otherwise, you should find an argument specific to
      the particular regulation that's troubling you today.
 
        malvosenior - 4 hours ago
        I would make all of those arguments so I guess I?m
        intellectually coherent:)
 
          wilg - 3 hours ago
          How does your argument handle the issue that it's not
          possible to ask every single person in the country to
          understand how cancer drug safety works, how food safety
          for poultry works, what makes a restaurant kitchen safe,
          and how to properly construct a building that won't fall
          on your head? All those in addition to the hundreds of
          thousands of other things I'd have to deeply understand
          in order to keep myself safe?It is not possible or
          reasonable to expect people to have enough information on
          all of these topics in their heads at every moment they
          might make a decision.Not only that, the people who want
          to open a restaurant in an unsafe building or sell you
          tainted meat have a clear incentive to hide that
          information from you and from everyone else.In this
          world, how could anybody make a good decision on the
          thousands of things we buy or use during daily life? Even
          with perfect information, which is strongly
          disincentivized?Regulations solve this issue by hiring
          the government to figure out and enforce the best way to
          prevent these issues so that every time we go out to
          dinner we don't have to ask the waiter "Which of these
          walls is load-bearing?".
 
          malvosenior - 2 hours ago
          Reputation and expert advice cover this. Check Yelp to
          see if anyone got crushed to death before you dine and
          you should be fine. Snark aside, there?s a lot more
          transparency now than when these laws were designed. A
          lot more competition too. The market will weed out truly
          bad actors.
 
          tptacek - 4 hours ago
          That's totally fine. I do not even a little bit agree
          with you, but it's fine to be a hard libertarian or an
          ancap. But most people aren't ancaps, so a persuasive
          argument against ICO regulation is probably one that
          doesn't depend on your audience themselves being ancaps.
 
          malvosenior - 4 hours ago
          I think you?re greatly overestimating the popularity of
          your opinion. If a ton of people didn?t agree with me the
          SEC wouldn?t need to step in and put a stop to it. It?s
          that so many people want to do this that they are now
          meddling.
 
          tptacek - 3 hours ago
          I absolutely agree that lots of non-ancaps think the SEC
          should stay out of ICO regulation. But so far as I can
          tell, they haven't these arguments through. I've seen
          only two forms of pro-free-ICO argument on this
          thread:(1) Special pleading arguments that suggest that
          despite the fact that tech startups have little to no
          inventory, trivially simple expenses, no financing
          obligations outside their equity raises, and, for the
          forseeable future, no significant revenue --- that is,
          despite the fact that tech startups have virtually none
          of the attributes that make producing audited financials
          expensive --- they should be exempt from SEC disclosure
          rules.(2) Arguments suggesting that adults should be free
          to enter into contracts without protections because
          regulations have been obsoleted by the Internet.Argument
          (2) I get, and acknowledge. I do not agree with it, but
          fine.Argument (1) though makes no sense, and if someone
          would take the time to pursue it carefully, I'd be
          thankful.
 
          malvosenior - 3 hours ago
          I agree with you. Argument 1 makes no sense.
 
      orthecreedence - 4 hours ago
      > Why shouldn?t people be able to take risks they?re
      comfortable with?Because when enough of these nimrods makes
      the wrong decision at the same time, you get catastrophic
      failure and the rest of society is left holding the bag.They
      then go whining to the government which, in turn, enacts
      regulations to keep these things from happening again.
 
        tptacek - 4 hours ago
        If we're just recapitulating the statism-vs-anarcho-
        capitalism argument, we can probably put a bow on this part
        of the thread and everyone agree to disagree.
 
          orthecreedence - 3 hours ago
          I don't think I'm arguing against rugged individualism as
          an ideology, moreso the belief that the choices we make
          as individuals don't affect the people around us, which
          seems to be the repeating mantra from anarcho-
          capitalists.
 
        malvosenior - 4 hours ago
        You can go to Vegas right now and blow your life savings.
        Should that be illegal too? We need to stop the
        mollycoddling and let people make their own decisions (and
        yes not bail them out if those decisions turn out to be
        wrong).
 
          tptacek - 3 hours ago
          You can indeed do that. But very few people do, because
          when you try to mortgage your house to bet your life's
          savings at a craps table, your spouse refuses to sign the
          paperwork, because everyone knows that for a working
          class family, spending $10,000 at a casino means you have
          a problem.The same is not true of investments, which can
          be very persuasively marketed to normal people without
          gambling problems. Which is why the SEC cares so much
          about how securities are marketed and promoted, and why
          you can sell stock in virtually anything as long as you
          (1) register and (2) publish audited financials
          documenting how crazy your business idea is.
 
          malvosenior - 3 hours ago
          If the ?problem? is marketing then the solution is
          counter-marketing, not regulation. Ideas should compete
          against each other and not be forced with the threat of
          violence (the state).You?re right in that we
          fundamentally disagree so won?t go anywhere here. I
          appreciate you arguing in good (enough) faith though.
 
          orthecreedence - 3 hours ago
          > you get catastrophic failure and the rest of society is
          left holding the bag.You didn't respond to what I said.
          When enough people make a large mistake, the effects go
          beyond just the individuals. At that point, it's no
          longer a "personal choice," it's damaging to the whole.
 
          malvosenior - 3 hours ago
          I did: ?and yes not bail them out if those decisions turn
          out to be wrong?Of course any action at scale will have
          impact beyond the individual. I do not believe the state
          (or anyone else) can determine what?s best for everyone.
          Such a thing is not possible and instead is used as cover
          to remove personal freedom.
 
          orthecreedence - 3 hours ago
          Ah, I'm sorry, I missed that part of your response. In
          that case, your point is taken (I disagree, but that's
          fine).
 
    jMyles - 4 hours ago
    Man, as usual, you make some good points but summarize your
    position with an out-and-out strawman:> ICO enthusiasts want to
    paint this as retail investors being excluded from "10000%"
    gains.If this is your best impression of the intentions of
    token developers, I really think that you need to engage in
    better listening.Obviously our perspectives differ re: the role
    of the state in the information age.  Over the past - what has
    it been, three years - I haven't yet convinced you that the
    state is subject to deprecation by dint of the connectivity of
    the internet.  I may yet.But even if I can't, I really think
    that you will benefit from realizing that much of the crypto-
    blockchain experimenting is about finding ways to replace
    functionality of the state, or to subvert its more violent and
    insidious tendencies.To use the current example, I can imagine
    something like MUN eventually replacing the various regimes of
    inspection and regulation around food service.  Perhaps you
    gasp, and say, "how can we do that?!  The streets will run with
    the blood of the dead from e. coli!"However, this both assumes
    that the state does a good job at regulating food (it doesn't)
    and that a decentralized solution won't (it can).  The state
    exacts nothing short of brutality on our food supply, from
    effectively subsidizing factory farms to forcing farmers at
    gunpoint to destroy raw milk [0].  That last event happened
    down the road from my partner's family, by the way.Now, I have
    no idea of the impact that MUN may have had - perhaps it wasn't
    going to do any of the good in the world that I'm imagining.
    But neither do you!  Neither does anybody!I don't want the same
    thing to happen for GRMD and cannabis, for SPANK and adult
    services, and so on.  These are good ideas that deserve a
    chance to work in the world if they can.It's no secret that I'm
    working on a blockchain-driven KMS, NuCypher.  And I put a lot
    of heart into my work.  I'm very excited about what it can mean
    for people who want to share secrets in a key-managed way but
    don't want to trust the likes of Amazon and Google.When I put
    in the extra hours, I'm largely motivated by the thoughts of
    who might benefit: Chinese dissidents who need a safe place to
    chat online.  Medical providers who want to share records in a
    trustless way.  File-sharing applications who color outside the
    lines of the stone-age IP infrastructure present in much of the
    world.This is exciting stuff, and I much prefer to bring it to
    life without needing to constantly be in a confrontational
    position re: three-letter agencies.  It's seriously time to re-
    evaluate the role of the state and make sure that we focus on
    reducing the violence that it brings to our world.0:
    https://www.theorganicprepper.com/michigan-dept-of-agri-forc...
 
      tptacek - 4 hours ago
      This is all fine, but if you want to be persuasive outside of
      niche sites, you'll find arguments that make sense to people
      who aren't anarcho-capitalists.
 
kelvin0 - 4 hours ago
Seems to me they were not engaged in anything different from video
games which allow you to purchase ingame virtual currency. What's
the difference? Genuine question.
 
  tptacek - 2 hours ago
  If you promoted an in-game currency as an opportunity to profit
  on resale, you would have similar legal problems. Especially if,
  like Munchee, you did it for a video game that didn't really
  exist yet, so that your in-game currency had no plausible value
  other than for speculation.
 
  haldean - 4 hours ago
  For one, there isn't a market where you can buy and sell them;
  usually the developer decides on the price, and you can't
  exchange them back into USD.
 
    cwkoss - 3 hours ago
    Also, the terms of service usually forbid sale between
    individuals
 
eximius - 7 hours ago
For better or worse, this sets a fairly clear precedent. Will be
interesting to watch people try to get around it.
 
  deweller - 6 hours ago
  I am a co-founder in the cryptocurrency space.  Our lawyers were
  smart and advised us against releasing a utility token ICO
  because they predicted that these SEC actions would be coming.Our
  approach to "get around" this is to file all the necessary
  paperwork for a legal security and then only sell the token to
  accredited investors.
 
    Nursie - 5 hours ago
    Yeah that doesn't sound so much a workaround as it does "doing
    things properly"
 
    IncRnd - 6 hours ago
    Did they discuss Title IV of JOBS with you?
 
    cptaj - 1 hours ago
    What I don't like is the "accredited investors" part. That just
    means its going to be just as hard as getting stock which is
    prohibitive to a lot of investors in the world.
 
    homakov - 6 hours ago
    What are the steps and costs to do same? Who is accredited
    investors btw?
 
      tptacek - 6 hours ago
      https://www.sec.gov/files/ib_accreditedinvestors.pdfGenerally
      : earning over 200k/yr, or having a net worth over 1MM
      excluding your house.
 
        whataretensors - 6 hours ago
        tldr; 10000% returns are limited to club members only
 
          tptacek - 5 hours ago
          tldr; exemption from SEC disclosure laws that protect
          investors of all classes are limited to club members
          only.
 
        komali2 - 5 hours ago
        Wait, and people are arguing that this process isn't an
        arbitrary class lock out?
 
          tptacek - 5 hours ago
          I don't know what "class lock out" means, but the
          restriction is pretty obviously there to prevent people
          from staking their livelihoods and financial futures on
          unvetted offerings.The idea is that people who have high
          incomes or high net worths (a) either are financially
          sophisticated, or can trivially afford financially
          sophisticated advisors, and (b) are unlikely to be
          staking so much on a single deal that their long term
          outcomes will be at risk.
 
          komali2 - 5 hours ago
          How do you correlate existent material wealth with any of
          your claims?What's to stop an inheritor from making a
          poor investment with all their capital? Or a lottery
          winner? Or ANYBODY with that kind of money, really?Why is
          it presumed that at "arbitrary net worth 1 million," a
          person is "financially sophisticated?"If the sec wants to
          I guess "protect people from themselves," why don't they
          have an actual certification system that is based on a
          demonstration of knowledge?Finally, why aren't people
          with a net worth of under 1 million protected from other
          poor financial decisions, since in your mind they are not
          "financially sophisticated" and thus are more likely to
          engage in payday loans or other predatory financial
          institutions?
 
          tptacek - 5 hours ago
          Actually, I agree that the RegD numbers are arbitrary.
          They should be much higher: they haven't tracked
          inflation. A person with 200k in annual income in 2017 is
          by no means necessarily in a position where they can
          safely invest in securities that have exempted themselves
          from disclosure requirements to their investors.
 
          DennisP - 4 hours ago
          On the other hand, someone with $150K income and $800K
          net worth can easily afford a $5K investment, and is
          probably sophisticated enough to not be completely stupid
          about it. It makes more sense to use percentages rather
          than a fixed cutoff (and in fact that's what the JOBS Act
          does).
 
          tptacek - 4 hours ago
          And, in fact, even if you make $50k a year, you can
          invest up to low-thousands in RegCF regulated issuances,
          or even more in a Reg A+ mini-IPO issuance.By and large,
          the entities pursuing 8-figure ICOs are those that (a)
          don't want to spend $10,000-$20,000 to engage with the
          SEC and adhere to their disclosure rules, and (b) aren't
          credible enough to raise from accredited investors.What's
          crazy to me is the notion that a business venture that
          can't scrap together $20,000 should somehow obviously be
          entrusted with $15,000,000 of retail investor money.
 
          dahdum - 3 hours ago
          > 'Why is it presumed that at "arbitrary net worth 1
          million," a person is "financially sophisticated?'It's
          not so much proving they are financially sophisticated as
          it is saying they have enough that "they are on their
          own". For instance, I  can't recall many people caring
          about the wealthy who lost so much in the Madoff scandal.
          Most opinions seemed to be "they should have known
          better".> 'If the sec wants to I guess "protect people
          from themselves," why don't they have an actual
          certification system that is based on a demonstration of
          knowledge?'You can actually be exempt from the
          income/wealth requirements if you are an investment
          advisor / registered broker. I believe you can be an
          executive at the issuer and be exempt to.> 'Finally, why
          aren't people with a net worth of under 1 million
          protected from other poor financial decisions, since in
          your mind they are not "financially sophisticated" and
          thus are more likely to engage in payday loans or other
          predatory financial institutions?'SEC doesn't regulate
          those. I agree predatory lending should be reigned in
          though.
 
    dangero - 5 hours ago
    But how are you going to make the coin available for liquid
    trading in the future?
 
    Alex3917 - 6 hours ago
    > Our approach to "get around" this is to file all the
    necessary paperwork for a legal security and then only sell the
    token to accredited investors.How does this square with the SEC
    commissioner's statement yesterday that not a single ICO has
    registered to do a security offering?
 
      Kubuxu - 6 hours ago
      By requiring all investors to be accredited you are exempt
      from the long registration process with SEC. The law in
      question is "Rule 506(c) of Regulation D", see:
      https://www.sec.gov/fast-answers/answers-rule506htm.html
 
        [deleted]
 
    sillysaurus3 - 6 hours ago
    Can you give a brief checklist (or notes, or anything at all)
    regarding the necessary paperwork? What's involved?
 
    [deleted]
 
    s73ver_ - 5 hours ago
    Can I ask why you'd still go ahead with a token after all that,
    instead of doing a normal security? With all the same reporting
    and other regulations as a security, what does being a token
    get you?
 
    subroutine - 5 hours ago
    You mean, exactly like authorized shares of common stock?How is
    this any different than traditional corporate
    capitalization?Did you set aside a large pool of tokens for a
    potential investor who prefers convertible equity?A reserve for
    an option pool? How will employee stock
    options..erm..sorry..'token options' plan work?If your company
    is successful, and a great offer comes up to exit, what's the
    plan for M&A using tokens?Most importantly, why would investors
    want coin over stock? Are they given all the same legal company
    equity rights as traditional stock?
 
    52-6F-62 - 6 hours ago
    So basically, follow the existing law that governs securities
    and investments. I personally don't see a big problem with
    that, considering the laughable scams that have occurred over
    the past six months.I am curious, though, how that works with
    proposed international investors. (I'm not well educated in the
    financial space)I hope that these actions clear house of the
    scams, and open room for good projects to exist without some
    shade of doubt cast over them?at least not for the reasons
    there exists some kind of shade now.
 
      erikpukinskis - 6 hours ago
      > I personally don't see a big problem with thatIt protects
      the monopoly the investor class has on investments like
      these.
 
        kordlessagain - 5 hours ago
        > It protects the monopoly the investor class has on
        investments like these.False.If anything, it exposes
        consistently larger "chunks of value" to the risk involved
        in the investment. Given accredited investors are used to
        evaluating risk it simply allows the to participate freely
        in the unknown risks of these types of investment vehicles
        without getting smaller investors involved in the mix. (It
        also prevents them from using their position against lower
        investment amounts made by lower accredited
        individuals.)The "protection" afforded here is to the
        common investor, who by definition does not carry a large
        store of value with them. By preventing them from investing
        directly, by way of limiting their involvement based on
        their stored values, the SEC is protecting the "collective
        stored value" of the lower classes. And, this makes sense,
        given the dollar's value is based in part on what people
        are willing to pay for a given set of objects. This is the
        responsibility of the Fed to US.An analogy would be the Yap
        allowing their children to go and mine Rai Stones by
        themselves. No sensible society would allow this to occur,
        given the dangers. And, yes, I'm comparing lower accredited
        investors to children, when considering the amount of
        knowledge they may carry with them regarding risk.
 
          jrs95 - 5 hours ago
          Who the hell in the "lower classes" is investing their
          money? Even a good share of middle class Americans have
          no investments at all or so few that their net worth is
          either negligible or negative. The idea that the SEC
          needs to be "protecting" these people when buying lottery
          tickets and cigarettes is legal is laughable.
 
          justrobert - 5 hours ago
          And yet anyone can buy 3x leveraged ETF/ETNs and not
          understand how the products are structured.  Some of
          those products, due to the structure, will always lose
          value over time as the futures used to replicate them are
          normally in contango.So some financial products where
          they will always drift to zero are fine, but investments
          in companies that have a chance to profit aren't allowed.
 
          tptacek - 4 hours ago
          You can create a company that has ludicrously limited
          opportunities to return its capital, and sell those to
          the public. You simply have to comply with the SEC's
          registration and disclosure rules --- in particular, you
          have to publish quarterly audited financials confirming
          your limited prospects.That is the difference between the
          "3x leveraged ETF" and the "company that has a chance at
          profit" in your example, not some weird value judgement
          the SEC is making.
 
          njarboe - 3 hours ago
          But you can bet $20,000 on the single spin of the
          roulette wheel and the expected value is negative.If you
          are allowed to do investing when young and at low levels,
          like many other things in life, you could learn some
          great lessons and maybe you won't sell your 1/2 million
          dollar IRA investments for 1/4 million in a market
          downturn.
 
        ChuckMcM - 3 hours ago
        That phrase, and the combination of 'monopoly' and
        'investor class' tends to jar me because as I see it the
        truth is exactly opposite to the sentiment expressed.
        Rather than protect the 'investment class' it protects
        people who can't afford to lose all of their
        investment.Part of the problem is a sort of systemic
        survivor bias where the accredited investors rarely talk
        about all the times they lost all of their investment, and
        instead focus on the ones where they made money (the more
        disproportionate the better). The reality is the most of
        the investment opportunities that are offered only to
        accredited investors lose money, and what that translates
        to is that most people, if allowed to invest in these
        things, would lose money they couldn't afford to lose.It
        can be hard to see that when an angel investor crows about
        a huge payday from someone they helped get started. And in
        hindsight it is "easy" to see how that deal made perfect
        sense. But imagine if you were allowed in on Uber's last
        fundraising round and now they are in danger of a 40% 'down
        round' courtesy of SoftBank? That second mortgage you took
        out on the 'hottest startup in the bay area' starts looking
        like you're going to have to pay it back by your own
        labor.Another argument I have heard made is "Hey, it's my
        money and who are you to tell me how to invest it?" (note
        told in the first person even though the 'you' reading this
        or commenting on it may have never made such an argument).
        I totally understand and resonate with that argument, but
        when you do invest it with someone who was very slick and
        had you completely believing that they could turn dog poo
        into gold, and it turns out after you lost your entire
        investment that they never really could and there was
        evidence in their books or history that, had you known, you
        never would have invested. Then you want them punished some
        how, but for what? Lying through omission and tricking you
        out of your money?  And we have a system for that, its a
        bunch of regulations, imposed by the SEC, which allows the
        SEC to fine or jail people who violate them. And they
        include things like FD or Full Disclosure rules which
        demand they cannot lie to you by omission or it is on them.
        And if an investment is legit and they want to offer it to
        non-accredited investors, then the person selling the
        securities will go through the necessary hoops and there
        won't be an issue selling them to you.
 
          hackinthebochs - 3 hours ago
          > Rather than protect the 'investment class' it protects
          people who can't afford to lose all of their
          investment.The problem is that this isn't a binary. To
          protect the hapless grandparents from losing their
          retirement, it also restricts knowledgeable but not rich
          people from making informed decisions for themselves.
 
        bdcravens - 3 hours ago
        The "investor class" are prepared to handle loss. This
        isn't free money that oligarchy are keeping from the poor.
        Perhaps the floor is currently too high, but you should
        absolutely have savings before you consider investments
        where you stand to lose. In other words, an "investment
        class".
 
        itamarst - 6 hours ago
        And by "investments" you mean "worthless and fraudulent
        garbage", if we're talking about ICOs. Honestly garbage is
        probably worth more, might be recyclable or
        compostable.More broadly, there's a whole set of finance
        research showing that the investments that accredited
        investors get access to (private equity, VC, etc.) aren't
        any better that normal investments on a risk-adjusted
        basis.
 
          sillysaurus3 - 6 hours ago
          And yet, that worthless fraudulent garbage is one of the
          few ways to get rich.If Oculus had done an ICO instead of
          a kickstarter, my $400 wouldn't have been merely a
          preorder. The $400 would've become quite a handy sum by
          the time Oculus got acquired.That requires integrating
          ICOs into the existing startup structures, but it's worth
          trying.
 
          wpietri - 2 hours ago
          > And yet, that worthless fraudulent garbage is one of
          the few ways to get rich.They are a much, much better way
          to get poor. There's a reason we have the laws we do: a
          long history of amateurs getting taken to the cleaners by
          professional fraudsters.
 
          mikestew - 5 hours ago
          And yet, that worthless fraudulent garbage is one of the
          few ways to get rich.The worthless fraudulent garbage is
          an even a better way to get poor. Which is why there is a
          financial test to make such investments: ?does this
          person have that kind of money to piss away??
 
          DennisP - 4 hours ago
          But that should be a percentage of net worth, rather than
          a binary function that flips at an arbitrary $1M.
 
          mikestew - 4 hours ago
          As Mason said to Dixon, ?ya gotta draw the line
          somewhere?. Percentage of wealth as a measure misses one
          key aspect: accumulating a million dollars isn?t that
          hard. You can either work a middle-class job and not piss
          away every penny as fast it comes in, or you?re so loaded
          that a million dollars is what you keep in the checking
          account for emergencies. In the former case, you don?t
          get $1MM being an idiot at finances. Yeah, that leaves
          out the gal with $900K, but see first sentence. For the
          latter, you lose $500K, who cares? You?ll still eat
          tomorrow.Of course there are numerous counter-examples.
          Rap artist M. C. Hammer comes to mind. A rich person can
          afford a bad investment or two, but not a string of them.
 
          teraflop - 2 hours ago
          > You can either work a middle-class job and not piss
          away every penny as fast it comes in"Middle class", using
          the conventional definition of 67%-200% of median
          household income, is about $40k to $110k a year. The
          median within that range is about $65k. Let's say you pay
          about 25% in taxes, and manage to save 1/3 of what's
          left. That's about $16k/year, which means it would take
          that household an entire lifetime to save up a million
          dollars.
 
          jonknee - 1 hours ago
          > That's about $16k/year, which means it would take that
          household an entire lifetime to save up a million
          dollars.~23 years if you add $16k a year and compound at
          8% (below average S&P return for our lifetimes). If you
          increase contribution along with pay increases the time
          to a million will be less, small changes in return % also
          make a huge difference.Not exactly overnight, but also
          completely doable.
 
          mikestew - 2 hours ago
          which means it would take that household an entire
          lifetime to save up a million dollars.Well, then, I guess
          they best not be pissing away what little they have on
          dodgy ICOs. I mean, perhaps I?m wrong on the math, but
          you still haven?t convinced me of the case that those
          making $65K/year should get to dump their retirement
          money into dodgy investments. Rather, you?ve furthered
          the case against.
 
          dabockster - 4 hours ago
          The line of thinking here seems to be that, to get to
          $1M, you probably have learned a lot more than someone
          making only $50-60k a year. So not only would you have
          the capital, you'd also have the common sense not to make
          a poor investment.
 
          crankylinuxuser - 2 hours ago
          But it also continues the idea "Only the rich may get
          richer. These things are not for the little guy."Unless
          we want to equate "Not having a great deal of money as
          someone who is too stupid to know how to invest."
 
          saalweachter - 2 hours ago
          Frankly I think there's also some sort of "sympathy
          level" in the law.If a little old lady living on a fixed
          income loses all her meager savings to a huckster we feel
          a lot worse for her than if a Wall Street 1%er with three
          houses loses all his savings to the same huckster.Which
          might not be the fairest or most logical way to
          legislate, but laws are about feelings as much as
          anything else.
 
          Gargoyle - 1 hours ago
          People with a million dollars are no better at detecting
          bad investments than people without. If anything, they're
          worse because they imagine themselves to be far more
          sophisticated than they actually are. I've witnessed this
          time and again.
 
          dabockster - 4 hours ago
          > If Oculus had done an ICO instead of a kickstarter, my
          $400 wouldn't have been merely a preorder. The $400
          would've become quite a handy sum by the time Oculus got
          acquired.And Oculus could have just as easily took your
          $400 and vanished without a trace. Or you could have
          unknowingly purchased shares that were worthless to begin
          with.
 
          ryanwaggoner - 4 hours ago
          And yet, that worthless fraudulent garbage is one of the
          few ways to get rich.Historically, this has not been
          true. Depending on your definition of "rich", very few
          wealthy people have gotten there by investing in other
          people's companies where accreditation was required. Most
          wealth is built by via ownership of your own company,
          real estate (which is a type of company), or by investing
          in public markets. These pathways are all still available
          to you, and almost certainly still represent a better
          long-term risk-adjusted return than ICOs.If Oculus had
          done an ICO instead of a kickstarter, my $400 wouldn't
          have been merely a preorder. The $400 would've become
          quite a handy sum by the time Oculus got acquired.This
          actually is an interesting point, but it does require
          some serious cherry-picking. I'd be interested to see the
          data behind a scenario where all the funded startups for
          the last decade had been ICOs instead of venture-backed.
          I doubt it'd look so rosy in that scenario, especially
          when you consider that many more failures would likely
          have been funded, based on how easy it is to raise money
          from an ICO based on nothing other than a pretty website
          template.
 
          kekeblom - 2 hours ago
          Considering that an ico in oculus?s case would mean that
          they would issue a token which could be exchanged against
          a device, I fail to see how the token could increase in
          value in any significant way.
 
          ryanwaggoner - 1 hours ago
          I guess I was thinking more of Oculus as platform than as
          device.
 
          cstejerean - 5 hours ago
          Why would your ICO have been worth anything at all during
          an acquisition? If it isn?t tied to equity in the company
          (to avoid securities violations) then what exactly would
          have given it value in an acquisition? Who would have
          bought it from you for more money and why?
 
          sillysaurus3 - 5 hours ago
          I meant conceptually. If the startup ecosystem embraces
          ICOs, then that type of thing can happen.Right now we'd
          just have to settle for "If Oculus got acquired, the
          price probably would have gone up." But you could imagine
          starting a company that promises to incorporate tokens
          into the structure somehow: Perhaps the founder would say
          they'll only sell to acquirers that are willing to offer
          token holders $x, where $x is based on the price over the
          last month before being acquired. Then it'd be in the
          founder's best interest to sell as little of the token as
          possible to cover operations, since otherwise it reduces
          their chances of getting acquired -- just like normal
          investment.Also it incentivizes founders to make the
          company do well: if they can tap into funding when needed
          (because they have premined coins they can sell), they're
          less beholden to the valley. That means a smart 18 year
          old can single-handedly launch and fund a company; no
          permission needed from some cabal of investors.Moot was
          15 when he launched 4chan. If you believed in its future,
          you could've (a) supported it by buying their token, and
          (b) possibly made some return on that belief.Obviously,
          all of the normal caveats apply: most investments don't
          work out. But everyone knows that.If I want to put $2k
          into a company, why is the government stepping in to stop
          me? I can go waste $2k at the casino or squander it
          however I want. It's my money.Bitcoin itself can be
          thought of as an ICO. When people buy Bitcoin, we're
          buying into Satoshi's vision for the future. It's not
          merely because it's useful. So why is that legal, but
          ICOs aren't?The overall point is that this is a powerful
          model, and it could become even more powerful. The rest
          of the world is embracing it, so the US could find
          themselves left out by getting too draconian.
 
          [deleted]
 
          dkersten - 5 hours ago
          If the ICO tokens are tied to some reward on acquisition,
          then how is it any different from other securities? May
          as well just sell equity at that stage (perhaps through
          something like seedrs, which accepts small investments
          too). If it?s basically just a security like any others,
          why should it bypass the regulations?If it walks like a
          security and it quacks like a security, then everything
          else is just a technicality: it?s a security.Also, what
          benefit does using a cryptocurrency even buy you here
          other than as a technicality to attempt to sidestep the
          laws?Maybe the laws should be relaxed to open it up to
          more laypeople, but given how easily people get burned
          and scammed at this stuff, I?m not fully convinced (penny
          stocks anyone? Or even Bitcoin: yes some people got rich
          and others will get rich in the future, but there?s a
          very high chance that a lot of laypeople who bought in
          recently because of the price surge are going to lose a
          lot of money). The point of ?accredited investor? is that
          they can afford to lose their investments.
 
          DennisP - 4 hours ago
          Someone with $800K in savings who makes $150K/year can
          easily afford to lose a $5K investment, but is not an
          accredited investor.That's why we have the JOBS Act now.
          I'm hoping some ICOs start using it.
 
          jonknee - 5 hours ago
          Or maybe your Oculus ICO would have been worthless
          because it wasn't an equity offering...
 
          zeroxfe - 5 hours ago
          > And yet, that worthless fraudulent garbage is one of
          the few ways to get rich....for the founders of said
          fraudulent garbage and perhaps a small number of very
          lucky people.
 
          tptacek - 5 hours ago
          There is a reason you need to be an accredited investor
          to buy startup stock, and it isn't because the elite
          banksters are trying to protect their monopoly (startup
          venture capital for early-stage --- anything prior to,
          say, a B-round --- startups is a rounding error).Changing
          the word "stock" to "coin" doesn't change any of the
          underlying dynamics.
 
          mbesto - 3 hours ago
          > it isn't because the elite banksters are trying to
          protect their monopolyTo quote The Dude "Well, that's
          just like your opinion, man". I think your point is that
          the intention of the law is so that people are
          manipulated into buying securities they can't afford
          (e.g. scams). This is true, however some would argue
          that this legislation is yet another reason the rich
          continue to stay rich, which is a legitimate argument. So
          I wouldn't be so dismissive of that opinion.
 
          cycrutchfield - 3 hours ago
          The laws exist for a good reason, and it's because
          historically many folks with insufficient means lost
          their shirts due to such scams. A judgment was made that
          between restricting such risky schemes to those with the
          means to handle that risk ("the rich") and letting people
          lose their shirts, restricting such risky schemes was the
          lesser of two evils.And I tend to agree.
 
          tptacek - 3 hours ago
          Can we be clear that the law does not restrict "risky
          schemes", but rather "schemes that refuse to follow
          disclosure laws"? There are thousands of publicly traded
          companies and a lot of them are batshit. What allows them
          to trade without SEC molestation is that they (a)
          register, (b) publish audited financials, and (c) follow
          the SEC's rules about promotion.The difference between a
          restaurant review coupon ICO and a pink sheet biotech
          firm isn't risk. Both will almost certainly fail. The
          difference is that the ICO refuses to publish audited
          financials, and demands the right to shoot Youtube videos
          extolling a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to 9x an
          investment.That's what the SEC is protecting retail
          investors from.
 
          tptacek - 3 hours ago
          I do not understand the underlying logic of this
          argument. It seems to suggest that but for pesky SEC RegD
          rule, there'd be 10,000% appreciation opportunities for
          everyone, not just the wealthiest investors.How do people
          making this argument think money works? People that can
          commit $20,000,000 to an investment with the stroke of a
          pen are going to get the best opportunities no matter how
          they're structured: they can offer better terms.
          Literally the only thing retail investors could
          conceivably offer to compete with them is "willingness to
          be screwed over without recourse".Stipulate a future in
          which essentially no ICO is regulated, and most new
          venture raises happen with publicly traded ICOs. Follow
          that thought to its conclusion and explain to me how the
          best opportunities are going to provide 10,000% gains,
          rather than markets acting the way all logic in either
          direction about ICOs dictates they must act, and pricing
          risk and opportunity accordingly?I see how, in the post-
          free-ICO world, you'll be able to bet that restaurant
          review coupons will 10x your money. Coupons for
          everything. 10x your money on dog washing and cat
          sharing; that'll happen too.What I don't see is why the
          truly credible teams doing truly important work with a
          real chance of success are going to offer securities on
          those same terms. How does that work? How stupid would
          you have to be to look at a market where restaurant
          review coupons are worth $15MM because they're certain!
          to 9x your investment, and then go to market with the
          next generation of, say, the Cisco Catalyst 9400 switch
          on those exact same terms?Aren't restaurant review
          coupons in some sense the ceiling on how too-good-to-be-
          true these ICO deals can be? I mean: that business is
          obviously not going to work. A reasonably sophisticated
          person can only put money on it in the hopes that someone
          dumber will buy it off them in a week or two.
 
          sillysaurus3 - 2 hours ago
          Aren't restaurant review coupons in some sense the
          ceiling on how too-good-to-be-true these ICO deals can
          be? I mean: that business is obviously not going to work.
          A reasonably sophisticated person can only put money on
          it in the hopes that someone dumber will buy it off them
          in a week or two.Your argument hinges on the assumption
          that the government should protect people from this
          outcome. If they make a bad bet, it's their bet to
          lose.Right now, churches ask for thousands of dollars via
          mail. People send them with the hopes that they are
          "planting a seed" and to "watch that seed grow." All of
          this behavior goes on without society collapsing.What's
          the key difference? Why do people need to be protected
          when suddenly they have a chance of winning real returns,
          however remote?
 
          tptacek - 1 hours ago
          View few people mortgage their houses and send the
          proceeds to a church expecting to pay for their kids
          college tuitions.
 
          mbesto - 41 minutes ago
          > I do not understand the underlying logic of this
          argument.Just because you don't understand the logic of
          the argument doesn't invalidate it.
 
          tptacek - 32 minutes ago
          That's obviously true, but doesn't get us anywhere.
 
          pishpash - 3 hours ago
          Is there any access at all, even through other funds? If
          not then there is a problem. Maybe prohibiting
          advertising and soliciting is enough. Maybe place some
          limits. But there are no good reasons I can think of to
          blanket prohibit investment itself to the "non-
          accredited".
 
          tptacek - 3 hours ago
          Yes; the money venture capitalists invest comes from
          other funds, among them things like pension funds.A fact
          people seem to overlook in these discussions is that
          unless you can see the future, you can't just invest in
          Google and Airbnb; you invest in a sample of the whole
          tech startup market. And when you do that, by and large,
          you underperform the S&P 500.Funds and endowments invest
          as VC LPs not simply because they want access to the
          insane deals that startups provide, but because they want
          decorrelated investments: they want some of their money
          allocated to investments that will perform differently
          than the market as a whole. When you have billions under
          management, it makes total sense to throw tens of
          millions at tech startups.
 
          ShabbosGoy - 5 hours ago
          Aren?t ICOs covered under Reg CF of the JOBS Act though?
          That was the whole point of the JOBS act: to provide
          access to capital that an entrepreneur normally wouldn?t
          be able to obtain.An ICO is not a bad alternative to pre-
          seed funding.
 
          tptacek - 5 hours ago
          I don't know how many other restrictions apply, but
          apparently for RegCF, you can only take small amounts
          from non-accredited investors, and you have to raise less
          than 1MM.
 
          philipodonnell - 3 hours ago
          This perspective is... naive. When accredited investors
          became a thing it may have started as a paternalistic
          "protect the poor from themselves", but now it merely
          serves to limit the supply of investors (read:rich) to a
          relative few who can dictate more favorable terms to
          those seeking that capital (read:poor).When the primary
          determination is whether you already _have_ money, rather
          than education, professional history, earning potential,
          or a history of demonstrated ability to make informed
          investment decisions... it becomes extremely difficult to
          argue that its anything other than an artificial class
          barrier.
 
          caust1c - 2 hours ago
          > When the primary determination is whether you already
          _have_ money, rather than education, professional
          history, earning potential, or a history of demonstrated
          ability to make informed investment decisions...This is
          the case because many regulations (Tax code, laws) favor
          the wealthy.  If we didn't have the SEC regulations, then
          the clever and wealthy would prey on the poor and
          uneducated.  This is textbook what happened in the
          20s.Honestly, the SEC is probably one of the last decent
          regulatory bodies of our government.
 
          tptacek - 3 hours ago
          What I think is naive is the idea that opening investment
          in something up to the public would somehow harm the
          financial sector, rather than generating billions in
          profits for it.
 
          sillysaurus3 - 2 hours ago
          http://www.paulgraham.com/divergence.htmlVC funding will
          probably dry up somewhat during the present recession,
          like it usually does in bad times. But this time the
          result may be different. This time the number of new
          startups may not decrease. And that could be dangerous
          for VCs.When VC funding dried up after the Internet
          Bubble, startups dried up too. There were not a lot of
          new startups being founded in 2003. But startups aren't
          tied to VC the way they were 10 years ago. It's now
          possible for VCs and startups to diverge. And if they do,
          they may not reconverge once the economy gets better.This
          logic works in reverse, too: if funding becomes
          dramatically easier thanks to ICOs, startups have no
          reason to court VCs anymore. And that could be dangerous
          for VCs.
 
          tptacek - 2 hours ago
          Who cares about the VCs? VCs are an insignificant
          component of the financial system. I don't agree that
          ICOs would be harmful to VCs, but even if they were: the
          larger financial system would profit enormously from
          retail investment in fly-by-night startups.
 
          sillysaurus3 - 2 hours ago
          This subthread was about class barriers and investors.
          You expressed ICOs might not be harmful to them, so I
          mentioned a way they might be. Not sure where the
          financial sector topic came from.What exactly would the
          problem be with letting people crowdfund startups (i.e.
          equity)? Why not follow Filecoin's lead? I've been
          reading your arguments and you haven't really articulated
          your concerns; just persuasive cases that the status quo
          should be maintained.The next Google/FB/Netflix might
          very well start using the model here, if you let it. But
          only if they have access to capital. And right now, that
          means VCs.
 
          tptacek - 1 hours ago
          Again: you're suggesting that when we talk about the
          interests of rich financiers, we're talking about the
          VCs. I'm sure not. If there's a financial power center to
          be concerned about, it's Goldman Sachs, not Sequoia. The
          fact that ICOs might somehow impact some tiny corner of
          the finance industry doesn't matter if it's going to
          juice things for the giant investment banks.
 
          jakelazaroff - 2 hours ago
          Why would ICOs make startups less reliant on VCs, other
          than the fact that (for the time being) ICOs let startups
          skirt investment regulations they'd otherwise have to
          adhere to?I agree with tptacek's general thesis here:
          there's not any inherent difference between ICOs and
          "normal" early-stage investing that justifies an utter
          lack of regulation of the former but not the latter.
 
        indubitable - 5 hours ago
        This also deters entrepreneurship from otherwise less
        established entities. The risk with regulations like this
        is that in attempting to keep out the scammers, you also
        end up keeping out smaller by otherwise completely
        authentic entities.In the worst case you end up keeping out
        smaller players, yet the scammers find creative ways around
        the system. Take, for instance, patents. They were
        initially envisioned as a way for independent inventors to
        ensure their ideas were not stolen. But a century of
        absurdly complex rules and regulations paired with extreme
        fees mostly keeps out very small scale inventors. On the
        other hands, the scammers are seemingly as active as ever
        and completely inappropriate patents are still regularly
        granted. So what have we truly accomplished?
 
          s73ver_ - 5 hours ago
          If you're deterred by this kind of thing, then perhaps
          you're the kind of "entrepreneur" that should be
          discouraged. We absolutely do not need any more scammers
          in this space.
 
          [deleted]
 
          indubitable - 4 hours ago
          SEC compliance comes with extensive fees, delays, and a
          century of legalese. Coin offerings do not have to fall
          in the tens of millions of dollars. It's a practical way
          for smaller startups to raise small amounts of money. For
          instance the first company that started Musk's rise was
          Zip2 - and it was started with money that was in the 5
          figures. A coin offering instead of angel investors could
          have been an interesting option for a similar company now
          a days. For companies on this scale, having to hire a
          legal team to ensure compliance is a significant
          burden.How much do you think this will end up costing
          companies to comply with? Ultimately we'd all like to
          have 100% honest ICOs. But you have to balance the cost
          of compliance with the expected results. Many ICOs
          already block American investors and that was before
          this. How will this effect the rates of scams? How will
          this effect the rate of perfectly up and up ICOs that are
          not made available to US investors?
 
          s73ver_ - 1 hours ago
          If you're only focusing on the costs of compliance, then
          you're looking at the wrong thing."Coin offerings do not
          have to fall in the tens of millions of dollars."The
          amount of money does not matter; a scam is a scam."For
          companies on this scale, having to hire a legal team to
          ensure compliance is a significant burden."That sucks for
          them. But the alternative is far, far worse."A coin
          offering instead of angel investors could have been an
          interesting option for a similar company now a days."Why?
          If the only reason is that they don't have to comply with
          the reporting and transparency regulations, then it's not
          a good reason."But you have to balance the cost of
          compliance with the expected results."Why? And, quite
          frankly, why should an ICO be treated any differently
          than any other security? They are exactly the same; and
          have absolutely nothing differentiating them from
          traditional securities."How will this effect the rate of
          perfectly up and up ICOs that are not made available to
          US investors?"I'm going to say it won't. Perfectly up and
          up ICOs will be able to get compliance, and will thus be
          open to all.
 
          chickenfries - 3 hours ago
          If an ICO is perfectly up and up they should abide by the
          same regulation as other securities. If you can?t afford
          the regulation then you can?t afford to sell securities.
          It seems like ICO boosters have a hard time believing
          that everyone isn?t a libertarian who wants there to be
          no regulation on ICOs.
 
          kodablah - 2 hours ago
          > If you can?t afford the regulation then you can?t
          afford to sell securities.People are growing tired of the
          pay-to-play barriers to entry. Why can't we have the
          regulations without the financial burdens? (Hint: the
          answer is not about following the regulations themselves,
          but artificially limiting supply to make for easier
          enforcement. Otherwise there are too many to meaningfully
          regulate.)
 
          s73ver_ - 1 hours ago
          "Why can't we have the regulations without the financial
          burdens?"If you can find people willing to work for your
          without pay, you can.
 
          kodablah - 1 hours ago
          I'm questioning the amount of work required as the
          burden, not the humans. IIRC, the SEC filings require
          multi-thousand dollar fees. Many government services do
          not (or not at that level). Do you believe all of those
          other government services are making people work without
          pay? I don't think it's fair that you blindly assume the
          fees are equal to the administrative costs when it seems
          clear to me they are set at a level to detract the
          action.
 
          s73ver_ - 1 hours ago
          If you've got evidence to back up that claim, feel free.
          Remember, however, that the people the SEC employs for
          doing this are expensive.
 
          chickenfries - 1 hours ago
          How many government services require hours of work by
          lawyers per application?If you can't cough up a few
          thousand dollars or take our a small business loan to
          hire some lawyers, why should I believe that you're
          trustworthy enough to skirt regulations?
 
          kodablah - 1 hours ago
          I'm saying the application shouldn't require hours of
          work by lawyers any more than filing for an LLC or my tax
          filings require individual lawyer review.In my head, I
          read the last statement like "why should the law trust
          you if you don't have enough money, and why should you be
          allowed to do something without the law's trust?" I
          believe enforcement should be reactive on regulation
          skirting within reason. Akin to an audit, an arrest, or
          anything else. You agree to abide by laws, you may even
          sign something or fill out a form to that effect. That
          there is an extra step to see if you "really" agree seems
          to be a way to artificially limit filing counts. I admit
          I am not that knowledgeable on possible history where too
          many did fraudulent filings requiring this individual-
          lawyer-review preemption.
 
          chickenfries - 1 hours ago
          No I think people in general are quite happy with the SEC
          and  pay-to-play barriers. The boosters looking to make
          money of ICOs and such may be tired of the SEC, but
          that's like saying unlicensed drivers are tired of the
          cops.
 
          kodablah - 1 hours ago
          > I think people in general are quite happy with the SEC
          and pay-to-play barriersI think you are probably right.
          But as crowdfunding (er, "crowd investing") becomes more
          available to the masses and the SEC cracks down on it
          more, a whole group of people that otherwise were
          unfamiliar w/ these rules aren't going to remain happy. I
          would not be surprised to see the barriers relaxed (but
          not the regulations of course).
 
        antr - 6 hours ago
        you call it "investor class monopoly" (if such thing
        exists), I call it protecting citizens who can be easily
        duped
 
          jMyles - 5 hours ago
          It's basically "think of the children!" except you extend
          childhood to all of life.  Perfect, really.
 
          tptacek - 5 hours ago
          You can sell securities to anybody, including
          (presumably) children. You simply have to register them
          with the SEC and follow the disclosure rules all the
          other thousands of publicly traded companies have to
          follow.Heck, after the JOBS Act, it got even easier to do
          this under Reg A+, which allows for a lightweight IPO for
          raises under 50MM --- which describes most ICOs.What's
          happening in this thread is simply special pleading for a
          particular type of enterprise to be exempt from those
          rules.
 
          vkou - 4 hours ago
          It's mindboggling how people are perfectly OK with
          raising 50-200 million dollars with an ICO, when they
          don't have a team, or a working product, but they can't
          possibly afford the expense and hassle of compliance,
          auditing and disclosure.
 
          michwill - 3 hours ago
          There are two things here:* It's not OK to raise 200M
          with no team and product;* Compliance only creates
          obstructions, not protection.
 
          tptacek - 2 hours ago
          RegA+ companies don't require SEC proxy statements,
          director and 10% stockholder reporting, SOX independent
          audits, SOX internal controls documentations, or SOX CEO
          certification. Pretty much all they're required to do is
          create a quarterly audited financial report. How is that
          "obstruction, not protection"? What kind of company that
          ordinary people should invest in can't produce an audited
          financial report? Charities and nonprofits product
          audited financials!
 
          vkou - 49 minutes ago
          Thanks for bringing this up. I didn't realize just how
          lax the rules regarding being a Regulation A Plus company
          are.You don't need to be an accredited investor to invest
          in one. You just need to limit your investment to no more
          then 10% of your salary, or net worth, whichever is
          greater.There are currently over 150 Reg A+ companies in
          the United States. I am eagerly waiting for people
          lambasting how the accredited investor rule keeps out
          little people... To explain why little people aren't
          falling head over heels to invest in RegA+ corps.
 
          michwill - 2 hours ago
          Reg A+ is indeed easier than an IPO. I've seen some
          companies doing that, and it's 1 year pushback, to say at
          least.One year is an insanely long time these days!
 
          antr - 5 hours ago
          Except the majority (let's say 99%) of all adults have
          zero financial literacy
 
          pishpash - 3 hours ago
          Yet they are expected already to operate as if they do.
          What's one more thing?
 
          whataretensors - 6 hours ago
          Yet they don't protect people from pay day loans or from
          gambling.  They only 'protect' intelligent people from
          getting out of the system they've rigged.They also don't
          protect workers from getting worthless secondary 'common'
          stock.Keep regurgitating their lies.  It's working for
          them.
 
          mrep - 5 hours ago
          That's completely different.  Those are regulated so you
          know the exact deal you are getting up front.
 
          option_greek - 5 hours ago
          The common stock is one of the most direct way of
          screwing workers. I guess anything is okay as long as it
          is part of fine print.
 
          tptacek - 5 hours ago
          When you take out a mortgage to bring more capital to a
          craps table, literally everybody involved knows you have
          a problem. The same is obviously not true for securities
          and speculative assets.
 
        igorgue - 6 hours ago
        It's almost predictable how people will respond here to a
        comment like this...You're 100% right.
 
          bdcravens - 3 hours ago
          Indeed. "Investor class" just means having enough saved,
          or enough income, that you are prepared to make
          investments where you can lose money. It's like saying
          those with FICO's over 480 have a monopoly on the ability
          to get a car loan, or that those with basic math skills
          have a monopoly on programming jobs.
 
          kodablah - 2 hours ago
          > It's like saying those with FICO's over 480 have a
          monopoly on the ability to get a car loan, or that those
          with basic math skills have a monopoly on programming
          jobs.Wrong. It's like saying there is a LAW requiring a
          certain credit score or a certain set of math skills. I
          don't have anything to add on whether investor
          accreditation is fair or not, but comparing federal law
          and regulations to loan or hiring opinions/choices is
          disingenuous. The comparison to predatory loan
          regulations or legal certification requirements for
          hiring would in fact be more apt.
 
          bdcravens - 1 hours ago
          That makes sense.
 
      gst - 5 hours ago
      > I hope that these actions clear house of the scamsWouldn't
      the scams just get launched from other countries that don't
      have to care about the SEC?
 
        thrill - 5 hours ago
        Just like the valid entrepreneurial efforts will.
 
        abritinthebay - 5 hours ago
        Sure, and they?ll join Nigerian Email Scams where they
        belong
 
      tarsinge - 6 hours ago
      Good projects which will then be only available to accredited
      (i.e. already rich) investors? This defeats the purpose for
      me
 
        sdenton4 - 5 hours ago
        If you're smart enough to tell a good investment from a
        scam, why don't you have enough money to be an accredited
        investor?Or, in other words, by the time the plebes are
        jumping in on crazy new financial scheme X, you're well
        enough into bubble phase that restricting investment is
        probably fine.
 
          hackinthebochs - 3 hours ago
          >If you're smart enough to tell a good investment from a
          scam, why don't you have enough money to be an accredited
          investor?Do you not see the obvious chicken-and-egg
          problem here?
 
          tarsinge - 4 hours ago
          Have you seen the requirements to get accredited? How do
          you get there starting with a modest capital without
          taking insane risks?But beyond that I don?t understand
          why regulation on investment is seen as ok, but
          regulation in loans to prevent people to drown in debt
          (which is kind of worse) is frowned upon. I?m not even
          the most liberal person, but if people are free to lose
          more than they have (or buy guns, or destroy their health
          with sugar, or what else) then why are they not free to
          put their money where they want?
 
          chickenfries - 3 hours ago
          Because lots of people losing all of their money on bad
          investments has effects on the whole economy, see the
          Great Depression.
 
          tarsinge - 3 hours ago
          But when it?s institutions like in 2008 it?s ok?
 
          chickenfries - 3 hours ago
          No, that's a problem too? Why does everyone respond with
          "oh so you think payday loans and subprime mortgages are
          OK?"Do you actually want to go back to a time before the
          SEC. That's how you get a Great Depression.
 
  bluesign - 4 hours ago
  Will be easy, i think to evade:- setup a system that looks like
  it will increase value of your token over time(as MUN case: ?As
  more users get on the platform, the more valuable your MUN tokens
  will become?)- don't make any promises about increase in
  value/income about your token.- let people discover and share, or
  promote on side channels.IANAL but as far as I searched, I guess
  as long as you don't make any value increase claims etc, you are
  totally safe
 
  pmarreck - 5 hours ago
  Good news: ICO's are now technically a security!Bad news: ICO's
  are now technically a security!
 
Kiro - 3 hours ago
Is CryptoKitties a security then?
 
[deleted]
 
KyleTokenReport - 4 hours ago
To put this in perspective, Token Report analyzed its database of
ICOs and found each one that currently uses similar language to
Munchee; or, promises returns to investors.
https://medium.com/tokenreport/token-report-whos-been-breaki...
 
nickbauman - 2 hours ago
I keep hearing pundits talk about cryptocurrencies as being
"outside the regulation of any government" over and over. They need
to stop saying this.
 
nugget - 6 hours ago
I'm confused; if you can't use ICO proceeds to fund operations,
then what can you spend them on?  Where is the money supposed to
go?
 
  CPLX - 6 hours ago
  The money for funding operations is supposed to flow through a
  registered or otherwise legal security instrument, which this ICO
  was not. The law hasn't changed, just the supposedly innovative
  ways of pretending the law doesn't exist.
 
  csomar - 6 hours ago
  Nope. You can use the ICO like the IPO. You just need to follow
  the regulation required. Obviously, they opted for an ICO to
  avoid that.
 
  PeterisP - 6 hours ago
  The money can (and probably should) go to fund operations,
  however, you're supposed to register such ICOs with the SEC and
  follow the proper process just as any other release of securities
  to investors.
 
  mc42 - 6 hours ago
  I believe this is part of their announcement on how the SEC will
  be handling ICOs, but
  IANAL.https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=15902054