GOPHERSPACE.DE - P H O X Y
gophering on hngopher.com
HN Gopher Feed (2017-12-05) - page 1 of 10
 
___________________________________________________________________
Microsoft launches Windows 10 on ARM
213 points by OberstKrueger
https://www.anandtech.com/show/12119/microsoft-launches-windows-...
-windows-10-on-arm-always-connected-pcs
___________________________________________________________________
 
StreamBright - 2 hours ago
I wish they launched an OS that has bare minimum interruption with
things I do not care about. I seriously do not need anything from
an OS than just a super lightweight interface to interact with
applications and filesystems. Why is it so hard?The mail.app vs
outlook is a great example of useful and useless UI. Both app does
the same.
 
  megy - 28 minutes ago
  Exactly, for most people they want the OS to get out of the way.
  Microsoft never seemed to get that. Constantly interrupting.
 
  jamesgeck0 - 53 minutes ago
  Outlook isn't part of Windows 10. The default Windows 10 mail
  application is actually pretty comparable to Mail.app.
 
  mlazos - 14 minutes ago
  I?ve seen firsthand the amount of work that goes into building a
  complex, scalable system and the problem with your statements are
  that  1) It?s hard to measure at scale what each of your users
  cares about. This is especially true with ?lightweight?
  interfaces - simpler UI means you have to carefully decide what
  you want to expose. 2) Generally the older software is, the more
  bloated it becomes - this is inescapable. The only real solution
  to this problem is full rewrites which rarely happen because
  they?re so expensive and time-consuming. By the time you ship an
  OS it might already have some bloat. 3) People like what they are
  used to. Remember the backlash with the Metro interface? Windows
  users would never get behind a major change to the Windows UI -
  everyone has been using it for almost 20 years now.
 
    FollowSteph3 - 5 minutes ago
    Especially 1). So many different people view what is an MVP
    differently, especially for an OS.
 
TYPE_FASTER - 1 hours ago
It will be interesting to see if this ends up in the
industrial/rugged handheld market, or if Microsoft has conceded
that market to Android for good.I guess it could be up to the
device manufacturers.
 
dest - 2 hours ago
So, as Windows will be available on ARM, we will have more laptops
with ARM, more than just Chromebooks. This seems like a win for
users.
 
  greenhouse_gas - 2 hours ago
  But with a locked bootloader, so not necessarily
 
    neilalexander - 13 minutes ago
    This might be a non-issue. The only people who are likely to
    care about installing alternative operating systems are power
    users, and power users may still prefer to buy more powerful
    Intel systems.
 
  gambiting - 1 hours ago
  But it already was, not long ago(Windows RT) and those laptops
  didn't sell at all. I don't understand why Microsoft is even
  trying again.
 
    chipperyman573 - 1 hours ago
    Windows RT could only run metro apps. This can run x86 apps on
    ARM
 
      undersuit - 1 hours ago
      Windows RT was only allowed to run Metro apps. We'll see how
      much of x86 we're allowed to run when we get our hands on it.
 
        jamesgeck0 - 31 minutes ago
        "Allowed" is a funny way of phrasing this. The technology
        Microsoft has built to run x86 Windows apps on ARM didn't
        exist when Windows RT was released.
 
          khedoros1 - 2 minutes ago
          I think that "allowed" is correct. A developer couldn't
          just recompile their desktop-style app into an ARM binary
          for RT, for example. They'd refuse to run, and not
          because of the CPU architecture. The only way to get
          third-party apps was through the Windows store, which
          only supports Metro apps. Metro apps had a limited API
          available to them.
 
Nullabillity - 2 hours ago
From Microsoft's Secure Boot OEM policy[0]:> The firmware setup
shall indicate if Secure Boot is turned on, and if it is operated
in Standard or Custom Mode. The firmware setup must provide an
option to return from Custom to Standard Mode which restores the
factory defaults. On an ARM system, it is forbidden to enable
Custom Mode. Only Standard Mode may be enabled.[0]:
https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/windows-hardware/design/com...
 
  nandhp - 2 hours ago
  > Applies to:> Windows 10 for desktop editions (Home, Pro,
  Enterprise, and Education) x64> Windows 10 for desktop editions
  (Home, Pro, Enterprise, and Education) x86> Windows 10 Mobile
  ARM> Windows 10 Mobile x86> Windows Server 2016 x64It's not clear
  to me that this document has been updated to reflect this
  release. Windows 10 Mobile is the successor to Windows Phone 8.1,
  while the article suggests that this product might better
  described as "Windows 10 for desktop editions ARM".From The
  Verge: "HP and Asus' devices will include Windows 10 S, designed
  to only run apps from the Windows Store, but users will be able
  to upgrade to Windows 10 Pro free of charge (for now) to get
  access to the full desktop apps."
  https://www.theverge.com/2017/12/5/16737288/microsoft-window...
 
  appleflaxen - 2 hours ago
  what does this mean? it will prevent users from installing an
  unapproved OS?
 
    Nullabillity - 2 hours ago
    Yes. Custom Mode is the override that normally allows you to
    disable their whitelist.
 
    nolok - 2 hours ago
    Devil's advocate here (but not really): it means it prevents
    your pc from booting on unsecured code, that it doesn't
    recognize. It's how you can fight stuff like the kernel root
    exploit that were starting to plague the windows world.The
    issue here is that Windows at first was asking not to provide a
    way to disable it back on x86, we got a compromise (we can
    disable it, and big distros could get signed).Now Microsoft is
    trying the same over ARM, so the fight starts again. Microsoft
    holds over ARM is mostly nothing though they're newcomers here
    and there are far manufacturers, so I'm sure they will end up
    losing their bet again.
 
      geofft - 2 hours ago
      Yes. From a computing freedom point of view, the only way I
      have freedom over my computing is if I control the code
      that's running on it. If I'm running code that I don't have
      source for, I don't quite control it as much as I'd like to.
      But if someone else is running code that I don't have source
      for, I sure as heck don't control it!Running a closed-source
      bootloader on a platform with firmware enforcement of signed
      bootloaders is not good. But the problem is not the signature
      requirement, the problem is the closed-source bootloader. The
      signature requirement is only a problem in the case where (as
      on Windows-logo machines running ARM) it requires you to run
      a closed-source bootloader, or even an open-source one that
      you do not have the ability to make changes to. If you want
      to ensure your computing freedom, the best thing to do is to
      have your firmware ensure that you and you alone, or someone
      you trust and them alone (e.g. a vendor of a free OS that you
      think is reputable), can boot code on your computer.
 
        nolok - 1 hours ago
        Oh I absolutely agree with you.But in the windows  kernel
        rooting exploit were really everywhere before that started
        being deployed.We can blame "everyone runs root all the
        time" and "disabling uac is a common tip on all windows
        site because users are used to be super administrator", and
        they all come back to Windows security model and default
        being complete shit until Windows 8 ((7 was still super
        admin as default user right?)), but I certainly won't blame
        Microsoft for finally cleaning that mess.Go back less than
        a decade back and most windows system of everyday users
        would have some kind of crap running as super root, that
        was terrible.
 
      pjmlp - 1 hours ago
      OEMs are pretty ok with it for Android, so I don't see why
      they will do otherwise with Windows.
 
        nolok - 1 hours ago
        Because they're not only trying to make a strong entry into
        the desktop computer, they're also about to finally go and
        fight Intel in servers (because Intel refused to make atom
        not suck)
 
  leggomylibro - 2 hours ago
  So does that mean no dual-booting?If so, sorry MS - this is a
  great step, but no sale yet.
 
    Nullabillity - 2 hours ago
    It's more insidious than that. The big distros have been signed
    and will probably work, but recompiling your kernel, using less
    common distros, or using third-party modules won't.
 
      geofft - 2 hours ago
      If they're signing Ubuntu's ARM shim loader the same way
      they're signing Ubuntu's x86-64 shim loader, you can use it
      to boot an arbitrary kernel in non-EFI mode. I am using this
      on my personal laptop to to boot Debian stable with Debian's
      kernel - grab shimx64.efi + grubx64.efi from Ubuntu, put them
      in the ESP, and write a little grub.cfg that sets $root and
      $prefix to the Debian partition and runs `normal`. Since
      you're exiting UEFI boot services before running unsigned
      code, Microsoft (apparently?) does not care.Also, if they're
      signing any Linux distro's shim loader, shim allows a
      physically present user to enroll their own key or disable
      secure boot. See method 3 at
      https://wiki.ubuntu.com/UEFI/SecureBoot/DKMS .(I don't
      actually know if they are signing any Linux shim for ARM - ht
      tps://wiki.ubuntu.com/UEFI/SecureBoot/Testing#UEFI.2FSecur...
      implies no. Which means you can't use any version of Linux on
      it, unless they change their policy.)
 
        mjg59 - 2 hours ago
        Microsoft won't sign third-party ARM drivers or
        bootloaders.
 
        Nullabillity - 2 hours ago
        AFAIK that's just another way to switch to Custom Mode.
 
          geofft - 2 hours ago
          Which? The first one (the one I'm running on my laptop)
          doesn't involve custom mode at all - I'm using an MS-
          signed bootloader to exit boot services and do some
          stuff, with no changes to SecureBoot or PK or any other
          variables. I have an actual Secure Boot-enabled platform
          with only Microsoft keys enrolled.The rest involve
          changing EFI variables, yes, but my impression is that
          "Custom Mode" refers to a UI in the BIOS which permits
          you to change the variables, and those variables are
          always writable by code running in boot services. The
          requirements say, "On non-ARM systems, the platform MUST
          implement the ability for a physically present user to
          select between two Secure Boot modes in firmware setup:
          'Custom' and 'Standard'." Nothing I'm suggesting involves
          going to firmware setup.
 
        swiley - 1 hours ago
        It makes absolutely no sense to do that. You get no added
        security at the cost of having to use non-free software.
 
      criddell - 1 hours ago
      You can't sign something you compile?
 
        Nullabillity - 1 hours ago
        It has to be signed with Microsoft's key.
 
TazeTSchnitzel - 2 hours ago
Intel lawsuit in 3? 2?
 
  batrat - 1 hours ago
  Maybe dumb questions:1. How can Intel sue MS for emulator, but
  linux(qemu) can get way with it?2. Why MS tries to push the
  emulator, when they can just port their programs (already ported
  to Win RT I think) and provide developers some tools to port
  their apps?
 
molsson - 1 hours ago
It's obviously not easy by any stretch of the imagination to port
something as complex as Windows to a new platform, but I'm still
surprised it took THAT long to finish this.
 
  megy - 14 minutes ago
  Who says that it was just finished recently? There are a large
  number of things that go into projects like this, Windows could
  have been ported years ago, but they were not ready.
 
  com2kid - 1 hours ago
  Windows has been running on ARM for ages. Windows RT was an early
  go, but even before that internal builds of Windows for ARM were
  kept around.Windows Phone 8 ran on the Windows 8 kernel, and
  Windows 10 Mobile ran on the Win10 kernel.It seems like the hard
  part here was doing the seamless emulation of x86 apps. Writing a
  production quality general purpose emulator is hard.
 
  criddell - 1 hours ago
  No kidding. This was announced in 2011, right?NT was available on
  Intel, Alpha, PowerPC, and MIPS chips. I'm surprised it was that
  hard to add ARM. Or is this something different?
 
    poizan42 - 50 minutes ago
    What do you think the Surface was running? After it got
    jailbroken people even compiled lots of different Win32
    applications and ran it on it.
 
ngsayjoe - 2 hours ago
I thought Intel threatened to sue if Windows run x86 apps with
Intel emulation on ARM?So QCOM is being sued right and left (Apple,
Intel, and governments all over the world)?
 
  microcolonel - 2 hours ago
  > So QCOM is being sued right and left (Apple, Intel, and
  governments all over the world)?For what it's worth, if you do
  competitive business like Qualcomm does, there will most likely
  be at least one pending lawsuit against you at any given time.
 
  mtgx - 1 hours ago
  Empty threats, I think. Either way, I think Intel is long overdue
  another anti-trust lawsuit from the EU for its GPU bundling in
  laptops, as well as other things. Don't worry, the EU has an
  anti-trust case against Qualcomm already.
 
throwaway613834 - 2 hours ago
Does anyone know if/when Windows 10's x86-on-ARM thing might come
out for phone(s)? I don't really care for the emulation on laptops
but I need to upgrade my phone and this is a factor.
 
  TazeTSchnitzel - 2 hours ago
  Combined with the Continuum thing for Windows Phone
  (https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/windows/Continuum) this would be
  incredible. You could use your phone as a desktop
  replacement.Unfortunately, it seems like Microsoft has given up
  on Windows Phone already.
 
    lebrad - 1 hours ago
    Microsoft gave up on Windows RT to go back to the drawing board
    and build Windows on ARM. It's the same with phones: they gave
    up on Windows Phone so that they can have a "Surface Phone" do-
    over in the future. This allows them to introduce hot "new"
    products rather than updated versions of failed products. There
    are many examples of Microsoft doing this.
 
    snarfy - 17 minutes ago
    Possibly, but they have not given up on Windows.  They came out
    with Linux for Windows.  I can see them coming out with
    something like Windows for Android - a compatibility layer
    allowing e.g. Office for Windows ARM to run on Android phones.
 
    throwaway613834 - 2 hours ago
    I thought it was supposed to be for phones. That's what I read
    last year: "I'm hearing this Cobalt [x86-on-ARM] technology is
    aimed at phone and possibly tablet/desktop devices." [1] I'm
    confused when it became a laptop thing at all.[1]
    http://www.zdnet.com/article/microsofts-x86-on-arm64-emulati...
 
      WorldMaker - 1 hours ago
      It's always been something of a laptop thing? Microsoft since
      Windows 8 has made it somewhat clear they think Windows needs
      a strong presence on ARM tablets to A) avoid Intel hegemony,
      B) remain competitive with the iPad in that space. "It
      doesn't run any of my apps," was perhaps the biggest
      complaint about Windows 8 ARM tablets, so it makes sense that
      x86-on-ARM was a big strategy push before the next
      attempt.Beyond that, rumor has it that Microsoft hopes
      selling tablets/laptops with ARM will open the Windows ARM
      space enough in the meantime while the Windows team is
      finishing the next version of key Windows shell components
      (nicknamed the "Composable Shell" or CShell), which would be
      make the Continuum experience for say Phones stronger because
      instead of switching entirely different shell applications
      (start menu, taskbar, et al) between form factors, the same
      applications responsively adapt themselves.
 
        throwaway613834 - 1 hours ago
        I'm confused, I just quoted an article from 2016 saying it
        was about phones and possibly tablets/desktops, and you say
        it's always been a laptop thing? Anything you can quote
        from 2016 to that effect?
 
          WorldMaker - 11 minutes ago
          The Verge's article from 2016 says "laptops are expected
          to be the first devices", and brings up Windows RT as the
          predecessor, just as I mentioned
          it:https://www.theverge.com/2016/12/7/13866936/microsoft-
          window...
 
      TazeTSchnitzel - 2 hours ago
      Microsoft announced they were going to make vanilla Windows
      10 run on Snapdragon.
 
        throwaway613834 - 1 hours ago
        Yeah but does that imply phones? Or is it about Snapdragon
        tablets or something?
 
bhouston - 49 minutes ago
What is the performance on the cross compiled apps?  What about
directx or opengl support?  Benchmarks please for chrome or ie or
Firefox.
 
  Raphael - moments ago
  Something tells me Edge will have an advantage, at least for
  awhile.
 
TekMol - 49 minutes ago
Do the devices that it runs on make good linux machines?I would
love something as light as the Galaxy Tab S2 (Less then 400g!!)
that I can use with Linux and a type cover.I would be able to work
everywhere I go. Because carrying around 400g with me all the time
would be worth it.
 
  Raphael - 3 minutes ago
  You can run Linux on Chromebooks.
 
cjsuk - 1 hours ago
Windows RT 2. We know where that went.
 
ChuckMcM - 2 hours ago
I hope and expect Apple to watch this closely. Playing with the iOS
11 on an iPad pro 10.5 suggests a bit what a Macbook Air might look
like in 'appliance' mode with one of their customized ARM
processors.The really interesting bit however is whether or not ARM
notebook computers can become a 'thing' for real. There have been a
couple of runs at it by people without the resources to do
something competitive with the thin and light laptops of today,
doing it "for real" has always seemed a bit out of reach.It becomes
more and more clear to me that something like a Chromebook type OS
and a walled garden app store is a really attractive proposition
for people who don't do development on their machines.
 
  tomaskafka - 1 hours ago
  Try RDPing from iPad to Windows 10, for me it feels amazing, and
  I'd gladly buy iPad-like device with Windows 10 for working on
  the road.
 
    esturk - 11 minutes ago
    Which app were you using for this? the MS RDP app? I was trying
    it but couldn't get it to work in my LAN when my windows 10 was
    using usb tethering. Maybe I'll try again with a proper access
    point.
 
greywolf - 46 minutes ago
great! garbage on smallest of platforms...
 
TheCoreh - 2 hours ago
Hopefully this partnership will allow Qualcomm to bring the
Snapdragon performance on par with the Apple CPUs.
 
  ricw - 2 hours ago
  This is unlikely. Apple's CPU budget for it's devices is likely
  much higher than anything Qualcomm's customers are willing to pay
  (vs the current snapdragon pricing). Apple's CPUs are very very
  large and consequently relatively expensive. As an example, a
  latest gen snapdragon 835 has 3 billion transistors, while
  Apple's A11 has 4.3 billion.
 
    endorphone - 1 hours ago
    Of course competitors want more powerful options, and they
    certainly have the budget for it given the pricing of premium
    Android devices.Qualcomm simply fell behind. While Apple went
    for powerful, enormous cores in small numbers, Qualcomm and
    friends bet on simpler, smaller cores. Apple has started
    copy/pasting their fantastic cores, yielding the enormous
    transistor counts.I admit to being a skeptic when Apple went
    off to do their own thing, sure that a whole industry (and
    options like the Tegra) would make them eat their hat. Apple
    executed and are in a remarkable position now.
 
    Symmetry - 2 hours ago
    And those numbers severely understate the difference since,
    IIRC, a much larger fraction of Apple's SoC transistor budget
    is devoted to its application processors.EDIT:  Found an image.
    More a simple understatement than a severe
    one.https://wccftech.com/apple-a10-fusion-cores-bigger-than-
    comp...
 
  niftich - 2 hours ago
  Why would that be the case? Do you foresee this putting a great
  deal of performance-related pressure on Qualcomm that wasn't
  there before, despite them being a top-shipping smartphone CPU
  vendor?Given Qualcomm's just-announced partnership with AMD [1],
  Qualcomm is clearly pursuing multiple strategies to compete with
  Intel, but they can leverage AMD to cover their weaknesses,
  instead of trying to outpace Apple's A-series in places where the
  market seems fine with the current Snapdragons.[1]
  https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=15855188
 
    microcolonel - 2 hours ago
    Well, Apple and Qualcomm have taken different approaches.
    Having a (successful) desktop/laptop product will cause them to
    make architectural decisions which don't make sense on a
    smartphone in general.
 
    mtgx - 1 hours ago
    > Do you foresee this putting a great deal of performance-
    related pressure on Qualcomm that wasn't there beforePossibly.
    Although I don't doubt Apple may have superior expertise in
    designing ARM chips (which sounds strange when comparing to the
    #1 ARM chip maker), I think one of the main reasons Qualcomm
    hasn't been able to match Apple is that Qualcomm has to
    optimize its chip for a variety of OEM needs.Apple on the other
    hand, could even push the TDP by 20% on its chip, if it know
    that it can make up for that loss of efficiency with more
    optimized software that's developed specifically for that
    chip.The AMD partnership is very interesting. I hope they
    double down on that.Fun fact: Qualcomm wanted to buy AMD in
    2015, but because of some terrible management and engineering
    choices with the Snapdragon 810, which led to a sales slump
    that year, the board was so furious that i wanted to sell
    Qualcomm's chip business! (and sell just modems).Of course,
    that would have been a terrible idea, business-wise, which is
    why if Broadcom buys Qualcomm I hope it does get rid of that
    board and Qualcomm's CEO from day one.Another fun fact:
    Qualcomm's Adreno GPU is AMD's old Mobile Radeon GPU division,
    and Adreno is an anagram of Radeon.I've been hoping someone
    like Qualcomm or Samsung buys AMD. Perhaps it may actually do
    that eventually, with or without Broadcom's help. Then we can
    see some real competition against Intel, and AMD alone simply
    lacks the funds to compete head-on with Intel in many
    areas.Also, now I'm starting to wonder if Broadcom knew about
    this deal and it's why it wanted to buy Qualcomm now.
 
      megy - 20 minutes ago
      > I think one of the main reasons Qualcomm hasn't been able
      to match Apple is that Qualcomm has to optimize its chip for
      a variety of OEM needs.This just makes no sense at all. So
      you are saying some OEM's want slow chips? No, of course not.
      Or are you saying that Samsung S8 has different needs to LG
      V30 or to the Google Pixel? No, of course not. There needs
      are all the same.
 
  matthoiland - 2 hours ago
  The A11 chip is insane for a tablet. Would love to see a Surface
  Pro with this performance.
 
    baldfat - 2 hours ago
    The i5 and i7 of Surface Pros absolutely melt A11's
    performance. The A11 would have run laps for battery life
    though.
 
      bigdubs - 2 hours ago
      Not really according to geekbench.a11:
      https://browser.geekbench.com/v4/cpu/5286336i7 (rmbp):
      https://browser.geekbench.com/v4/cpu/52858994.1k vs. 4.8k
 
        Joeri - 2 hours ago
        Interesting that the multi-core score is a lot lower.
        Probably you're seeing thermal management in that multi-
        core score, meaning a macbook with active cooling should be
        able to reach much higher multi-core numbers.The A11 is way
        too overpowered for a phone or tablet. Apple is clearly in
        the awkward phase where they've almost gotten the right CPU
        to put in their laptops. The A12 will be a no-brainer. Same
        performance as i7, way better battery life, way cheaper to
        produce.
 
          endorphone - 1 hours ago
          Note that the A11 has two "big" cores, and four much
          slower but power efficient "little" cores. If they were
          making an A11 variant for desktop use they would have the
          power profile to use more big cores.
 
          bigdubs - 2 hours ago
          I think hyperthreading with the i7 also gives it an edge
          with multi-core
 
  bitmapbrother - 2 hours ago
  Why would this partnership have any significance on the
  performance of Qualcomm SoC's? Qualcomm doesn't really drive the
  performance of the architecture they license - that would be ARM.
  The next generation Snapdragon, Exynos and Kirin SoC's will all
  use ARM's new A75 and A55 core dynamIQ reference designs and
  their performance will be the same.
 
ateesdalejr - 2 hours ago
Can't wait to see windows on a RPi soon... If windows even can run
on 512 megs.
 
  ghostly_s - 19 minutes ago
  Size aside, I tried installing Win10 To Go on a USB 3 flash drive
  recently (just a typical 'high speed' flash drive, not the
  external eSATA drives they certify) and the performance was
  beyond unusable. I can't imagine anything would run off an SD
  card.
 
  wlesieutre - 2 hours ago
  There?s been a trimmed down ?IoT? version on RPi for a few years
  https://www.techrepublic.com/article/windows-10-on-the-raspb...
 
waytogo - 2 hours ago
Something I wanted from Apple.First time Microsoft seems to be more
focused than Apple (which works on semi-innovations like
touchbars).
 
  cjsuk - 1 hours ago
  None of MSFT?s innovation actually works properly though. If they
  just invented the light bulb you?d have to replace it once an
  hour.
 
    tinus_hn - 47 minutes ago
    Joke?s on you. Actually you only have to remove it from the
    socket and turn it back in!
 
    simplyinfinity - 1 hours ago
    That's how light bulbs actually worked way back when. And now
    you have practically light bulbs that live for 10+ years and
    are 10 times more energy efficient.Remember when you had to
    reinstall windows XP every few months? Yeah, i haven't
    reinstalled my windows since windows 8 came out. I've done
    upgrade to 8.1, 10, 10 CU without re-installation or "refresh".
 
      giancarlostoro - 54 minutes ago
      Even with Vidta and 7 I never had to reinstall my OS. I had
      the same Windowd 7 install from 2012 till 2015 ~ and I think
      I stopped because I wanted to use Linux from then on instead.
 
  kosinus - 1 hours ago
  I expect Apple would either switch entirely, or not. But
  fracturing the desktop doesn?t seem like something they?d do. ARM
  would have to be the clear path forward.
 
    listic - 1 hours ago
    I dunno, it seems a lot to ask to not fracture the entire
    desktop.Matching the perfomance of 91W-class i7's found in
    iMacs would take a lot of ARM. 45W-class i7's in Macbook Pro's
    are quite powerful, too.
 
akhilcacharya - 38 minutes ago
The 24-hour, always connected battery life dream may be a reality
by this time next year.
 
joelthelion - 2 hours ago
So what are people going to use this for? Servers? Tablets?
 
  solidr53 - 2 hours ago
  IoT
 
  david-cako - 2 hours ago
  I think Microsoft is just realizing what Apple realized 8 years
  ago: ARM is the next x86 for the type of devices that people want
  to buy.
 
    jazoom - 1 hours ago
    I think you forgot about Windows RT.
 
      neilalexander - 10 minutes ago
      Windows RT was not a failure because of ARM, or because the
      hardware was not capable. Windows RT was a failure because,
      once again, Microsoft showed that they are completely
      incapable of reading the market. They tried to market a
      Windows experience to consumers and then did not deliver on
      the Windows experience.
 
  mtgx - 2 hours ago
  Low-end PCs in China, India, etc. Intel is selling even its Atom-
  based Celeron and Pentium chips for laptops at quite the premium
  (about $110 and $160 MSRP, respectively).I wouldn't expect these
  very first devices target that market, though, possibly because
  Qualcomm wants to be associated with more premium devices, but I
  think we'll see these chips in lower-end cost-competitive
  devices, too.
 
LeoPanthera - 2 hours ago
The difference between this and Windows RT is that this will
emulate an x86 chip to allow you to run apps compiled for Intel.
 
  asniper - 2 hours ago
  so I guess AMD compiled apps don't work? :P
 
    microcolonel - 2 hours ago
    Yeah, AMD64 applications don't yet work on this, only Intel
    ones. I think the stuff for a standard AMD64 machine isn't
    quite yet out of patent.
 
      yuhong - 2 hours ago
      The Intel patents for up to SSE2 should expire soon, and
      hopefully the AMD64 patents should be licenseable from AMD
      (if they are interested in that). I would not be surprised if
      this already emulates up to SSE2, given the likely release
      date and the fact that recent versions of MSVC already enable
      /arch:SSE2 by default.
 
        microcolonel - 2 hours ago
        > I would not be surprised if this already emulates up to
        SSE2, given the likely release date.Yeah, even if they
        could be sued, they could settle for a couple years damages
        max, or quite possibly win, since they're doing DBT (no
        different from QEMU or loads of other x86 + SSE2
        emulators).
 
      e1ven - 2 hours ago
      Somewhat amusingly, it provides one of the best reasons to
      continue to provide an x86 version of apps, rather than going
      64-bit only.
 
      jimrandomh - 2 hours ago
      I don't see any mention of x86_64/AMD64 in the article. I
      would expect a version of Windows which can't run x86_64 apps
      to result in a lot of nasty compatibility surprises--it's
      been awhile since developers had to support 32-bit-only
      hardware--so I'd expect Microsoft to support it if at all
      possible.
 
        yuhong - 2 hours ago
        On the other hand, this is mostly for legacy desktop apps,
        not server apps or the like.
 
        niftich - 2 hours ago
        You're right, the posted Anandtech article does not mention
        x86_64; however, other prior and recent coverage of this
        topic does confirm that x86_64 is not supported, such as
        this Ars Technica article [1] from the same day.[1]
        https://arstechnica.com/gadgets/2017/12/hp-asus-announce-
        fir...
 
        TazeTSchnitzel - 2 hours ago
        There's still a lot of Windows devices that run x86
        Windows, and new devices still ship with it, mostly low-
        memory or low-disk-space devices. Thus apps need to support
        it.
 
        microcolonel - 2 hours ago
        I think most Windows applications which are truly 64-bit
        only are either too large to run on a machine like this, or
        likely to be rebuilt for AArch64. For the time being, I
        think IA-32 support is enough to tide them over, and it has
        the benefit of being thoroughly out of patent (except some
        fairly common extensions, like SSE2, which will expire
        soon).
 
  adamjcook - 2 hours ago
  I wonder how Microsoft eventually dealt with this:
  https://arstechnica.com/information-
  technology/2017/06/intel...Intel seemed to indicate at the time
  that it was really interested in any licensing around the x86
  ISA.
 
    Joeri - 2 hours ago
    As far as I understand, they don't emulate the x86 instruction
    set, but instead cross-compile it to ARM native instructions.
    That means that whatever implementation details are behind the
    patented x86 instructions are irrelevant, since there is no
    emulation of those instructions, they are just replaced by
    equivalent ARM instructions. Intel will probably still sue, but
    I expect them to settle out of
    court.http://www.techradar.com/news/a-closer-look-at-
    windows-10-s-...
 
      mr_toad - 23 minutes ago
      "The real-time ?Just-In-Time? transcoding emulation that
      converts x86 instructions to ARM is done the first time you
      run the software, and then it?s cached by Windows"Still
      sounds like emulation to me.  It's a pretty fine line.
 
      cm2187 - 2 hours ago
      But can they patent the instruction set rather than their
      implementation? Feels like a repeat of the google java
      lawsuit.In fact weren?t the IBM compatible PCs in the 80s
      doing exactly that?
 
      rossy - 37 minutes ago
      Isn't that equivalent to emulating it? Like emulators for
      video game systems that have both an interpreter and a JIT
      recompiler, the latter is just an optimization of the former.
      They both must interpret the instruction set of the target
      and run equivalent instructions on the host.
 
    rbanffy - 2 hours ago
    "It's a nice market you have with high-margin enthusiast
    desktop CPU's, Intel. It'd be a shame if Windows stopped
    supporting them"
 
      loeg - 1 hours ago
      Windows cannot possibly cut support for x86.
 
  alkonaut - 37 minutes ago
  Is it a "full" windows, or a "modern windows" like RT was? I.e.
  does it run Win32/x86 apps or just the UWP/Store ones?
 
stonewhite - 2 hours ago
I'm curious about how that battery life would be like with a linux
installed.Also, I wonder the internals of that x86 emulation, if a
linux program can leverage it?
 
  mtgx - 2 hours ago
  Linux has supported x86 emulation on ARM chips for many years
  now, I think even before Android started supporting x86 chips.
 
    mjg59 - 1 hours ago
    Eh kind of? qemu can be used with binfmt-misc to do CPU
    emulation while still passing syscalls to the running kernel,
    but it's a long way from perfect - there's various corner cases
    that cause problems.