GOPHERSPACE.DE - P H O X Y
gophering on hngopher.com
HN Gopher Feed (2017-12-02) - page 1 of 10
 
___________________________________________________________________
Philadelphia write-in candidate: I won with one vote
55 points by LeoJiWoo
http://thehill.com/homenews/campaign/362934-philadelphia-write-i...
a-write-in-candidate-shocked-by-surprise-victory
___________________________________________________________________
 
timthelion - 47 minutes ago
"Judges in the city are paid $100 per election they preside over"
For a days work, that's not much for a one off job even by central
European standards. It seems to me, that the pay should be
increased.
 
pmoriarty - 43 minutes ago
Were electronic voting machines used here?In past elections,
whenever the issue of extremely hackable and vulnerable electronic
voting machines was brought up, objections were raised that their
use was too limited to make a big enough difference in the
election.  Well, here that's clearly not the case: the difference
was so slight that such fraud could have tipped the scales.
 
johnnyo - 1 hours ago
Ironically, a judge of elections using his first act to call for
impeachment of a candidate likely running in an election he will
preside over is extremely inappropriate.
 
  make3 - 48 minutes ago
  you should've campaigned against him/found him a competitor.
 
  kbenson - 1 hours ago
  Although when the same sentence ends with "... and also now every
  Tuesday in Manayunk is officially Taco Tuesday." it's easy to
  interpret it as in jest, which I think was the point.Depending on
  your views, you might also think it's inappropriate for this
  position to even joke about that, which I can sort of see.  I
  don't think it was a serious suggestion though.
 
    cabaalis - 48 minutes ago
    I would bet that he was indeed serious about the call for
    impeachment. If anything, it represents the current state of
    the public's awareness of appropriateness in politics.
 
      kbenson - 41 minutes ago
      > I would bet that he was indeed serious about the call for
      impeachment. If anything, it represents the current state of
      the public's awareness of appropriateness in politics.Would
      you also bet he's serious about Taco Tuesday?  Because you
      have exactly as much evidence for one as the other.Although I
      do take your comment and apparent inability to extend the
      benefit of a doubt as fairly negative indicator of the
      public's ability to work through the current political divide
      productively. :/
 
      aseipp - 24 minutes ago
      "I would definitely bet he's serious because it totally
      fulfills my preconceived notions about how he behaves, and I
      don't have to do anymore work to justify that." The tweet
      before the quoted one, made less than 10 minutes before the
      impeachment one, is:> Please move to Manayunk, where I now
      rule and now plan to secede from the United States.There are
      also nearly a dozen tweets following that of the same form
      (e.g. "The weird thing is, I demanded people always call me
      Judge Garcia, way before this even happened!")It's also quite
      laughable to chatter about "appropriateness in politics"
      referring to America, considering a bunch of idiot
      republicans drafted a tax bill in the middle of the night
      with scribbles in margins and passed it as law in our country
      without reading it, less than 24 hours ago (as of the time of
      writing this comment.)"Appropriateness" is a code word for
      "it's ok to make things measurably worse, if you just smile
      while doing it." But if you make a stupid joke about the Sex
      Crime President on Twitter, apparently -- that's just not
      cool, maaaaan, and it like, you know, like, tells us tons
      about the lame politics of the people, maaaaaaaaaan, it's
      soooooooo obvious, so easy to see. That's why I'm a genius of
      political analysis.
 
  aphexairlines - 32 minutes ago
  There is no such thing as appropriate in US politics anymore.
 
  pornel - 28 minutes ago
  Why? That's exactly what his voters wanted.
 
[deleted]
 
  dang - 1 hours ago
  Please don't post unsubstantive comments here.
 
bkohlmann - 30 minutes ago
It?s concerning that he wants to use the election judge role to
?advance progressive causes.?Election judges should be the most
non-partisan role in government.
 
  ringaroundthetx - 13 minutes ago
  two votes to get him impeached, after getting 20 signatures
 
isostatic - 1 hours ago
"being elected as an election judge"Is America unique in having so
many elections and positions? This job title reminds me of the
"Fuse alarm fuse" (which was the fuse for the alarm that checked if
a fuse had blown)
 
  johnnyo - 1 hours ago
  It?s a pretty minimal responsibility.  It?s basically the person
  whose job it is to setup the polling place, collect the ballots,
  and make sure there is no funny business.  You literally work 2
  days a year, and have no other responsibilities.
 
    anigbrowl - 47 minutes ago
    That's not responsive to the question that was asked. Yes,
    America is unique in having so many public offices filled by
    election.
 
    CaliforniaKarl - 20 minutes ago
    I was a polling place Inspector in Orange County, CA for around
    six years.In the lead up to an election I?d work, first up was
    ~2 hours of training.  We were the ones in charge of the
    polling place, so we were the ones who needed to know all the
    processes and procedures.The weekend before the election, I
    would pick up the supplies.  Probably around 40-50 pounds of
    stuff.  You aren?t allowed to leave In in your car: Once you
    sign the chain of custody for it, the next time you get out of
    your car is when you?re parked at home, ready to unload.In the
    weeks before the election, I also would be getting in touch
    with whomever is in charge of the polling place site.  You
    think it?s fun dealing with an HOA as a resident?  Well, try
    dealing with them as an outsider.So, leading up to the election
    (that is, prior to E-1), I would?ve logged about 7 hours, most
    of which was during a business day (training could be daytime
    or evening, as there were always multiple sessions available,
    and supplies pickup was always on a weekend).Oh, and I was also
    responsible for managing the other people would be at the
    polling place.On E-1, if I got prior OK from the property, I
    would set up some time during the evening.  Sometimes one or
    two of my clerks would be available to help, but not always.
    Anything non-sensitive and nonessential was set up (so, no
    breaking seals yet!).On E-Day I would be waking up around 4:30.
    Polls open precisely at 7, so I had to be at the polling place
    by 6.  I would take attendance, administer the oath, go through
    the same oath myself, and then do all the seal verification and
    equipment setup.  Then, the flood began.If I had a full board,
    I could give everyone (and myself) a lunch and a break.  If we
    were short, then we would do what we could.  Luckily, we all
    got some sort of break!There would be quiet times during the
    day, but it would often be nonstop during the morning (there
    was always a line at opening) and after 4.Polls close at 8.  We
    then had to do full packing, space cleanup, and all of the
    accounting.  It was a win for us if we left by 9.I then had to
    go to drop off everything, with a clerk driving behind me (to
    make sure I went directly to the drop off point).  If anything
    was missing, I was on the hook for it.  It was a win for me if
    I was out by 10.Finally, on E+1, I?d have to return the
    facility key.  Then I was truely done.It was a drawn-out
    process, but almost everything we did had a very good reason.
    Yes, the hours were long, and the work was often not fun, but I
    took a _great_ deal of pride in it.
 
      javajosh - 7 minutes ago
      Thank you for your service, Karl. Perhaps you might share
      some more light on your experience "administering the vote"
      as a polling place inspector. As a technologist, what do you
      see as the major error modes of the American system of
      polling? Do you think fraud is wide-spread? Is it even
      possible to measure fraud (since, by definition, if you
      detect it you eliminate it)? Are there other methods of
      polling that might work better? It seems like a really hard
      problem, and I've wanted to ask someone "on the inside" for a
      while now, and this seems like a good opportunity. Thanks in
      advance.
 
  greglindahl - 1 hours ago
  There's a long running joke in the US, dating back to the 1880s,
  that involves so many positions being elected:https://en.wiktiona
  ry.org/wiki/could_not_get_elected_dogcatc...
 
    quickthrower2 - 38 minutes ago
    Ha ha - that got me down a rabbit
    hole!https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/the-
    fix/wp/2014/06/02/a-...
 
lowpro - 1 hours ago
Jokes aside, I wonder if we're really seeing the long term erosion
of democracy because people just don't care. You can see it in most
aspects of the nation, from the NSA revelations largely being
accepted in a sigh of hopelessness to the several social issues
that have been in the news since 2014 and haven't seemed to move.
People just don't take an interest in the larger issues except to
tweet their thoughts and move on. I wonder if, for example, when
events like 9/11 or Katrina happened people were moved more to
donate or help because they couldn't just say "thinking of the
victims" in a public social media space and move on with their day.
And I don't think mandatory voting is a solution to this issue
because people will default to laziest method, which would probably
be whose name they heard the most. The big picture idea is how to
make people care, and that is probably the biggest unsolved issue
of our day.
 
  LeoJiWoo - 1 hours ago
  I think you are right.  Also people are being worn down by the 24
  hr news cycle and always on social media. It's hijacked our
  emotions into thinking facebooks likes or retweets matter more
  than voting or going out in the world and doing something.The
  other side is most people aren't doing well financially.I know
  tons of people who work all the time, and are just too
  exhausted/demoralized by the end of day for anything but tv and
  beer.The apathy, desperation, political violence/polarization,
  filter bubbles, poor economy for the average person, rise of the
  new alt-right, antifa, and resurgence of the extreme/alt-left all
  make me feel like a collapse is coming.
 
  Swizec - 15 minutes ago
  My pet theory is that a lot of the apathy comes down to modern
  outrage clickbait media. There's a new OMG HORRIBLE NEWS
  EVERYTHING IS FALLING DOWN AND LIFE AS WE KNOW IT IS OVER FOREVER
  emergency seemingly every day. They milk it for a day or two,
  sometimes a week, then they find something new.When everything is
  important and urgent, nothing is.
 
  RandomInteger4 - 57 minutes ago
  It seems to me like a lot of the apathy comes from the
  hopelessness people feel concerning their own situation in life.
  People don't see anything changing for themselves in the near or
  distant future, so that carries over into something they feel
  even more powerless about.
 
  pmichaud - 14 minutes ago
  I wonder if this is "efficient" though, like in the sense that
  it's the correct outcome given the actual incentives. Ie. the
  actual value of the given elected positions is such that everyone
  should correctly ignore that it exists. There is no individual
  benefit to taking on whatever menial responsibility the office
  represents, nor is there a systematic benefit that outweighs the
  personal cost for someone to heroically take on the duty anyway.I
  guess what I'm asking is that if things are rotting upstream of
  these positions, then maybe they are "rationally vacant"?
 
  cmurf - 54 minutes ago
  Most Americans have no experience with or understanding of
  political instability. So they think it's entirely viable to
  ignore politics and expect that things will just keep plugging
  along as they have. And then you look away and grad students are
  suddenly being taxed for waived tuition being considered
  income... And you look away again and suddenly an entire class of
  people are considered to have never existed in the country.How
  you make people care? Unfortunately it might be crises makes them
  care. No crises, no consequences, no confrontation with the
  alternative? Then people find something else to care about,
  rather than care about what seems to be a non-issue that doesn't
  involve or affect them and isn't interesting anyway.
 
  raquo - 52 minutes ago
  Feedback loop is way too long and way too uncertain for people to
  care. What can you even do to visibly affect decisions being
  made? There is nothing an individual person can do, because no
  one in power cares about individual people, whether they go
  picket or post to facebook.There are tens of millions of people
  in the US that really want  to change, for a lot of .
  However, without acting as a unified group they don't matter
  because they're dwarfed by equally disorganized and apathetic
  people who don't care. There are many examples from around the
  world of people getting what they want when they are numerous and
  well organized. Don't even need to look far, NRA is an example of
  this collective power (to some extent) in the US itself.There is
  a social engineering solution to this somewhere, just like the
  current situation is a result of deliberate social engineering,
  not some inevitable evolution of democracy.
 
  anigbrowl - 49 minutes ago
  It's not that people don't care, but that people have lots of
  things they could vote on and can't rationally make considered
  decisions on all of them. You can't 'make people care' unless you
  give them an incentive, and it's irrational to expect everybody
  to care about everything.
 
  PrimalDual - 46 minutes ago
  I would posit the alternative theory that perhaps things are
  going well enough that people don?t have to care and thus they
  don?t. Government is one of those things most people ignore
  unless it?s broken and usually pretty badly at that.  The
  problems you mention are real and worrying to those that
  understand them but are still pretty far removed from ordinary
  people?s lives. Perhaps this is the kind of thing that happens
  when systems work so well we forget they are there. Then stuff
  breaks down and people start caring again.
 
  um_ya - 29 minutes ago
  The further power moves away from people, the less people can
  actually do to change things. What's the point of being outraged
  at the things you can't control. If the government continues to
  abuse people's rights, whats the point of getting upset, if you
  can't change anything about it. The closer power moves towards
  people the more likely they will take action... Instead of trying
  to be master conductors, the government should focus on returning
  power back to the states and back to the people.
 
  greggarious - 24 minutes ago
  >Jokes aside, I wonder if we're really seeing the long term
  erosion of democracy because people just don't care.Or maybe a
  better explanation is that the will of the people is actively
  surpressed? Be it voter ID laws surpressing Democrats, or the
  democrats themselves surpressing the voices of progressives
  through superdelegates and closed primaries, there are serious
  issues with our democracy.Throw in a populace that's been the
  victim of a failing education system for decades due to
  candidates who slash taxes (and thus budgets).And now, when the
  problems are so acute, I find it very interesting that the
  narrative becomes that all these issues are the fault of the lazy
  voters. A convenient, and false narrative.
 
    corndoge - 21 minutes ago
    I don't think being required to prove you're an American
    citizen with a photo ID is suppression of the will of the
    people
 
      lukeschlather - 18 minutes ago
      How much does a photo ID cost? It's a poll tax any way you
      slice it.
 
        tedunangst - 4 minutes ago
        In Pennsylvania, about $30. That's at the high end. In
        Ohio, it's $8. Generally good for four years. Is $2 per
        year an impediment to voting?
 
      MPetitt - 6 minutes ago
      70 Years ago: "I don't think being required to prove you're a
      literate citizen with a test is suppression of the will of
      the people"If you look at the people affected it's clear that
      it is racial disenfranchisement under a different
      name.https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Literacy_test
 
      lordCarbonFiber - 2 minutes ago
      Fortunately decades of history and court decisions disagree
      with you.