GOPHERSPACE.DE - P H O X Y
gophering on hngopher.com
HN Gopher Feed (2017-12-02) - page 1 of 10
 
___________________________________________________________________
Woman with Transplanted Uterus Gives Birth, the First in the U.S
42 points by iamthirsty
https://www.nytimes.com/2017/12/02/health/uterus-transplant-baby...
___________________________________________________________________
 
LeoJiWoo - 51 minutes ago
Pretty fascinating science.The "hundreds of thousands of dollars"
cost is a bit concerning to me.  I'm also guessing it will
difficult to bring the cost down since it requires a donor uterus.
 
  adventured - 15 minutes ago
  The price will be brought down through other methods,
  specifically cloning. It won't make sense at all to rely on donor
  organs. At our current rate of improvement on cloning / growing
  organs and tissue, we'll be able to do it in the next decade or
  two.
 
koolba - 1 hours ago
From the article (not all contiguous but related):> A new frontier,
uterus transplants are seen as a source of hope for women who
cannot give birth because they were born without a uterus or had to
have it removed because of cancer, other illness or complications
from childbirth. Researchers estimate that in the United States,
50,000 women might be candidates.> The transplants are meant to be
temporary, left in place just long enough for a woman to have one
or two children, and then removed so she can stop taking the
immune-suppressing drugs needed to prevent organ rejection.> The
transplants are now experimental, with much of the cost covered by
research funds. But they are expensive, and if they become part of
medical practice, will probably cost hundreds of thousands of
dollars. It is not clear that insurers will pay, and Dr. Testa
acknowledged that many women who want the surgery will not be able
to afford it.While the science is amazing, why go this route rather
than having a surrogate mother? I've heard the price of a surrogate
is $30-50K.
 
  chiefalchemist - 58 minutes ago
  Taken a step further..why not adopt?While impressive it feels too
  much like a First World Problem. Aren't there any real problems
  this team could have solved?
 
    jroseattle - 52 minutes ago
    > While impressive it feels too much like a First World
    Problem. Aren't there any real problems this team could have
    solved?Talk to any couple who has had difficulty conceiving,
    and the humanity of this "first world problem" gets brought
    into perspective.
 
      mberning - 23 minutes ago
      Exactly. How can you not understand a person?s desire to have
      a child of their own flesh and blood? That instinct and
      desire is such a deep part of our biology. The people asking
      must be very young or have some strang sociopathy.
 
        ringaroundthetx - 17 minutes ago
        Intelligence and empathy may be inversely
        correlated.Diversity is helpful here
 
        chiefalchemist - 6 minutes ago
        I'm not doubting the desire. But in the face of 7 BILLION
        and counting...climate change...other questions about
        resources...AND there are other proxy-esque options...It to
        me feels selfish and shallow.You "bear" a child because you
        have love to give and to share. It's not about you, but
        about giving selflessly. I'm not judging what this is, or
        why. But this is not that. This is about the parents. The
        irony is disturbing.
 
        chiefalchemist - 1 minutes ago
        So cure (?) a problem for a handful of rich Westerners is
        The Most Important medical problem in the world right now?
        Seems to me you're overlooking other, far more significant
        (in terms of total numbers) suffering.The people thinking
        what you're thinking must be very young or have some
        strange sociopathy.
 
  b4lancesh33t - 1 hours ago
  Many, many women wish to carry their own children. Some want to
  do that this badly.
 
    chiefalchemist - 54 minutes ago
    Lucky for them there are no enforced prerequisites (i.e., test
    and/or license) for becoming a parent.I don't doubt some level
    of that drive exists. What feels questionable is the sanity (?)
    of going to such extreme lengths to pursue it? As if there is a
    complete unawareness of the bigger picture.
 
    cutcss - 1 hours ago
    "Want" as in they are biologically wired to want to do so;
    hormones/evolution/etc.
 
      creep - 58 minutes ago
      It may or may not be simply biological "wiring". Many women
      are fine with surrogates, and most surrogates are fine with
      carrying another woman's child without significant emotional
      attachment. Women who use surrogates want the child, the
      experience doesn't matter as much as a successful birth by
      any method.I think a big factor in the cases discussed in the
      article is that these women were told they would never ever
      have their own children. Unlike women who are "infertile"
      (which is usually just a measure of probability, and not a
      binary diagnosis), women who do not have a uterus obviously
      understand that there isn't a probability factor for getting
      pregnant. But then tell a woman with such a diagnosis that
      there is an experimental procedure that will allow her to
      fully experience what she had always been told was not
      possible. It is more for her than just wanting a baby at that
      point-- the procedure offers her everything she was told she
      could not have in terms of giving birth to a child.
 
      danharaj - 52 minutes ago
      Literally all of your thoughts and feelings are biologically
      wired.
 
  xenadu02 - 26 minutes ago
  Let?s say you lost your testicles due to cancer, but there?s a
  new procedure that can grow new ones from your stem cells. It?s
  experimental and will cost $150,000. Before having your cancerous
  testes removed you stored sperm.Are you really surprised that
  some men who want to be fathers would choose to have the
  procedure rather than using their own previously stored sperm?
 
  nvahalik - 1 hours ago
  > While the science is amazing, why go this route rather than
  having a surrogate mother?Or even just adoption. Adoption is far
  cheaper as well.There are plenty of reasons why people want their
  own biological children... but this seems like it carries a ton
  more risk with it. With complications from the transplant and
  heck even just childbirth.
 
    koolba - 1 hours ago
    Yes that's what I was trying to get at. The increased cost
    comes with significantly increased risk yet the same end result
    (a biological child).
 
  anonymfus - 25 minutes ago
  Surrogate motherhood is a very traumatising experience.
 
gnu8 - 24 minutes ago
I can't wait to find out from the republicans why this is an
abomination before the lord our god.
 
  creep - 9 minutes ago
  Why incite a political discussion? The connection this article
  has to politics is extrapolated in your mind for one purpose.
 
  adventured - 6 minutes ago
  Your statement contrasts amusingly with the actual context.This
  occurred at a conservative-leaning, Baptist university in Texas:
  Baylor.
 
  bamboozled - 3 minutes ago
  You will probably find they're in favour of bringing more of
  "their kind" into the world.
 
robocat - 1 hours ago
Any reason a man couldn't get one, with correct hormones?
 
  gregschlom - 50 minutes ago
  Now that's an interesting question
 
  theparanoid - 44 minutes ago
  A male pelvis is more narrow than a female pelvis.
 
    d4l3k - 38 minutes ago
    C-sections are already a thing.
 
      iamthirsty - 21 minutes ago
      Don't other parts of the body expand during gestation,
      though?
 
  actuallyalys - 35 minutes ago
  He would also need a vaginal canal so he could menstrate. That's
  possible with surgery, but it'd be a deal breaker for most men.
 
    keyboardhitter - 1 minutes ago
    menstruation would only be a component if the transplanted
    organs included functional ovaries and fallopian tubes. women
    who have full ovariectomy do not mensturate afterwards, as a
    slightly related example.there are existing procedures to help
    facilitate implantation and regulate hormones that have high
    success rate (most common is ivf).however, vaginal canal can
    also be useful to expel discharge and in case of pregnancy,
    placental fluid/sac -- but in a theoretical case of implanted
    uterus only, I wonder if "including" a vaginal canal would be
    more symbolic than medically necessary?
 
  adventured - 21 minutes ago
  Given where the technology is now, there's no scenario where
  thousands of men won't be doing this within a few decades. It'll
  get easier, safer and cheaper over the next 10-15 years of
  experimentation and development, putting it within reach of a lot
  more people. The number count won't be very high early on, it'll
  still be an incredible technological achievement.If 30 years out
  just 1 in 100,000 men are doing this at a given time, it'd be
  over 100,000 male births annually on the planet.
 
creep - 1 hours ago
I find it interesting that the Baylor team chose a shorter
timeframe from surgery to implantation with success. According to
the article, the initial thought was that a longer wait time gave a
chance for the women to heal, but the Baylor team thought the
immune-system-suppressants (used to ensure the body does not reject
a foreign organ) too harmful to continue for long periods.