GOPHERSPACE.DE - P H O X Y
gophering on hngopher.com
HN Gopher Feed (2017-11-30) - page 1 of 10
 
___________________________________________________________________
Finance Pros Say You'll Have to Pry Excel Out of Their Cold, Dead
Hands
66 points by triplee
https://www.wsj.com/articles/finance-pros-say-youll-have-to-pry-...
___________________________________________________________________
 
natural219 - 14 minutes ago
Wasn't http://witheve.com/ supposed to solve this? I love Chris
Granger and his team, but at this point he seems inclined to pivot
ideas every 2-3 years, instead of following through with an
industry-workable solution to some of these programming
problems...See also:
https://www.theatlantic.com/technology/archive/2017/09/savin...
 
j_s - 13 minutes ago
One interesting aspect of Excel is how a sheet can be shared in a
way that a compiled executable can not.Even with all the various
viruses floating around, opening a spreadsheet is a common and
allowed task as opposed to downloading, installing, and running
software.
 
  saagarjha - 9 minutes ago
  Well, Excel is interpreted, so a better comparison would be made
  against interpreted languages?
 
djtriptych - 8 minutes ago
Watch some youtube vids of Excel pros moving around the UI quickly.
There's no other UI I can think of where so much is being done so
quickly except maybe a bash pro.America's favorite villain Martin
Shkreli was pretty amazing.https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jFSf5YhY
Qbw&feature=youtu.be...
 
osullivj - 1 hours ago
Yes - Excel is deeply embedded in actuarial modelling.
 
  triplee - 1 hours ago
  Modeling yes, which makes sense given that it's a tabular math
  tool.Using it to handle all the pricing structure for a few
  thousand clients on the other hand is another issue by having
  underwriters plug in values that they got from an online
  application, though, not so much.
 
firefoxd - 6 minutes ago
Excel is sort of like PHP. The people who want it dead are very
vocal. But those who use it, use it to get the job done.
 
siruncledrew - 1 hours ago
Aside from macros,  keyboard shortcuts, and .xlsx files, why else
would someone be compelled to stick with Excel?Seems like the rest
of the tabular data stuff could be done in Google Sheets or some
other product and yield the same results.
 
  En_gr_Student - 21 minutes ago
  It is called "technical debt" and "organizational momentum".
  What do you do to stop a few million person-years of investment
  in a toolset without loss of value?  ... usually, nothing much.
  This is one reason that new OS and new Office versions also raise
  substantial ire in those same folks.There are semiconductor fabs
  running most of their machinery on Windows XP for the foreseeable
  future.
 
  noobhacker - 47 minutes ago
  People are wedded to Excel because they've spent a lot of time
  learning it and don't want their skills to become obsolete.The
  resistance is rooted in psychological / political reasons, not
  technical ones.
 
    sevensor - 21 minutes ago
    I disagree.  For users who aren't going to make the leap to
    "real" programming, spreadsheets are a huge boon.  Excel is the
    only thing many domain experts can use to turn their knowledge
    into a computational model.  Sure, there are tons of problems
    compared to models implemented in general-purpose programming
    languages, and we love to complain about the atrocities
    committed in Excel, but nobody's yet managed to devise an
    alternative with the same low barrier to entry.
 
      itomato - 2 minutes ago
      Spreadsheets are a huge risk to everyone, especially those
      who haven't made the leap to "real" programming.Excel, 1-2-3,
      Visicalc are, taxonomically speaking, in the same class.We
      have a new order of tools. While they have their own inherent
      risks, they reflect literally decades of thinking about the
      risks and limitations of tools whose lineage traces back to
      Visicalc.Macro management and security, versioning,
      distributed access, multidimensionality; all are addressed in
      a handful of ways with Alpha, Tableau, Looker and other
      progressive tools.Excel, floppies, line printers; relics.
 
    kinkrtyavimoodh - 18 minutes ago
    Have you ever been a power user of Microsoft Excel? And then
    tried to replicate that functionality in Google Sheets?Or is
    your aversion mostly to the M- word?I find it funny that when
    it comes to vi vs emacs (or any such similarly geek-approved
    thing), fans of each will jump up in arms about the precise
    reason their platform is better, but the same kind of people
    would not want to take hundreds of thousands of business
    professionals at their word about why they like using a
    particular piece of software.
 
      michaelmrose - 11 minutes ago
      Probably because the geeks can consider the virtues of making
      a spreadsheet vs an application while the office workers are
      incapable of understanding more than half the equation.Also
      office workers can't always be trusted to even plug things in
      let alone properly assess what an optimal solution looks
      like.
 
    throwaway2048 - 32 minutes ago
    Google sheets has a vastly inferior performance and feature
    set, trying to chalk that up as "psychological / political
    reasons" is pure spin.
 
  kgwgk - 15 minutes ago
  VBA, forms, integration with data sources..."All right, but apart
  from the sanitation, the medicine, education, wine, public order,
  irrigation, roads, a fresh water system, and public health, what
  have the Romans ever done for us?"
 
  JumpCrisscross - 44 minutes ago
  > Aside from macros, keyboard shortcuts, and .xlsx filesThose
  things. I literally run and pay for Parallels on my Mac for the
  Windows version of Excel. (Mostly for the keyboard shortcuts.)
 
  allenz - 11 minutes ago
  The main reason is that Excel has features for professionals, but
  another reason is that some companies don't want Google to have
  access to their data.
 
  TimPC - 40 minutes ago
  That's a pretty big aside. Like big enough to be a valid reason
  in and of itself. The other part is performance and interface lag
  which still tends to be an issue on any reasonable amount of
  data.
 
  DanBC - 9 minutes ago
  I love other spreadsheets. I use a few of them. My first was
  Lotus 123.But Excel is used because it's very very good. Many of
  the people use it need this one small weird thing, and Excel has
  it and none of the others do yet. And that one small weird thing
  is different for everyone.It's a bit scary to see how much stuff
  is kept going with scary hairballs of VBA and macros and god-
  knows-what.The EUSPRIG has more information. For example, this
  about spreadsheets in clinical medicine:
  http://www.eusprig.org/2006/spreadsheets-in-clinical-medicin...
 
  berberous - 39 minutes ago
  Why use VIM, emacs or Sublime Text, when some online cloud coding
  platform can probably do the same thing?In addition to the things
  you mentioned, Excel is an offline, native app, with much more
  speed and efficiency when dealing with complex or large
  spreadsheets, IMO.
 
  rb808 - 38 minutes ago
  Excel is a proper gui, Sheets is remarkable achievement in
  javascript but sucks to use for more than light work. Even
  editing a few cells in Google Sheets is fiddly.
 
  [deleted]
 
  therealidiot - 1 hours ago
  Google Sheets kinda sucks performance-wise though
 
  triplee - 1 hours ago
  It's on everyone's computer in the office, and doesn't require
  internet or training outside of your non-tech specialty.Also,
  there's a TON of .xlsx files in the wild with years of business
  knowledge and processing.  Everyone uses about the same 50% or so
  of Excel, which is captured in Google Sheets and any other
  spreadsheet.  It's the extra 20% that everyone else uses -- and
  it's a different 20% for everyone -- that causes the issue of
  entrenchment.
 
throwaway613834 - 3 minutes ago
How do finance folks deal with decimals? Doesn't Excel use binary?
Do they switch to integer?
 
  frgtpsswrdlame - moments ago
  What? Excel handles decimals just fine.
 
bitL - 1 minutes ago
With arrogance to irrelevance!
 
a_imho - moments ago
Well, if they don't want to get on with the times and really insist
(figuratively)Web link does not work, and clicking 'subscribe'
greets me with Error code: ssl_error_no_cypher_overlap
 
rabboRubble - 29 minutes ago
The issue in finance is the speed of change in demands. No
formalized system platform with proper change control can keep up.
The ability to play with data, the ability to break your work is
valuable in end user computing and the type of thing that is hard
to recreate a formal financial system that must pass internal and
external audits.
 
  rapht - 11 minutes ago
  This - exactly
 
justboxing - 28 minutes ago
One huge reason why Finance pros in general, and Fund Managers,
Brokers, Traders in particular, love Microsoft Excel is because all
your formulas and calculations update almost instantly (unless you
explicitly disable this feature).So they can apply their business
and process knowledge to create tables and formulas, pull data from
various sources, and create something that is self-contained,
stored locally (inside the lan, security reasons) and is blazing
fast.I've seen very sophisticated OMSs (Order Management Systems)
built completely using excel workbooks, with 1 sheet containing
orders and formula's to pull realtime pricing from bloomberg,
reuters, another sheet for pre-trade analysis, another for the
actual trades, and a summary sheet with pivot tables and charts to
show the trade progress and summary.As and when the last_price
changes, the formulas update, so the trader is looking at a real-
time view of his situation.The same excel workbook that let's the
traders do their job would take months / years to convert to a web
app, and even then, the speed may not match up.
 
  alecco - 16 minutes ago
  > The same excel workbook that let's the traders do their job
  would take months / years to convert to a web app, and even then,
  the speed may not match up.Sorry but I have to call nonsense on
  that part. I've seen recently a whole trading operation converted
  to a system very close to a web app within 6 months. The hard
  part of the job was untangling the mess they created. And
  knowledgeable quants who actually program told us it's
  typical.The financial pros have horrible, horrible stuff in their
  spreadsheets. They are used to it and they want (perhaps
  unconsciously) to keep their dirty hacks out of sight. Lest they
  fall from heaven.
 
    EpicEng - 14 minutes ago
    Except excel is a generic solution. If you have to build a
    specific solution for each process your costs skyrocket and
    people lose the ability to quickly implement something on their
    own.  Everything takes forever to get done because you're
    constantly haggling with development and writing requirements
    instead of just opening excel and getting work done.
 
      osrec - 12 minutes ago
      Not really. In the long term, reg fines and dev costs balance
      out.
 
        philipov - 6 minutes ago
        Citation please.
 
    osrec - 13 minutes ago
    As someone who works with these guys daily, you're 100%
    correct! The only thing that makes them change is new
    regulations telling them they have to.
 
    bischofs - 6 minutes ago
    I work with engineers (mostly mechanical) who are in the same
    boat. We built a quick python app to do in ~30 seconds what
    their excel/VBA shit fest did in 45 minutes.Excel and the like
    are better than nothing and for most non programmer numbers
    people probably fine - but if you need some real heavy lifting
    I would bring in the bug guns.
 
      trakter - moments ago
      I like that -- Programming should be called a bug gun more
      often. How can we get more bugs in here, lets bring out the
      bug guns!!
 
    cloakandswagger - 1 minutes ago
    And now that it's a proper application they have to worry about
    authentication, down time, security, documentation,
    maintenance, and the customization and changes they could once
    do in an instant now requires filing a feature request, waiting
    for it to be implemented and deployed...Even as a software
    developer I will freely admit that Excel is the right tool for
    many jobs. We shouldn't be so eager to transform workbooks into
    formal apps unless there is a really good reason to.
 
  sgt101 - 10 minutes ago
  Errm, I've seen spreadsheets that take an hour to open and
  "overnight" to update.
 
  threatofrain - 6 minutes ago
  What I don't understand is when shops start stressing the
  scalability of Excel, such as accountancy shops that share their
  spreadsheets around through primitive systems of locking (even
  some of the big 10 accountancies do this), why they never
  considered anything like Access.The jump is straight from Excel
  to full-on DB backend, with no transition in the middle.
 
  turc1656 - 4 minutes ago
  Yes.  I use Excel every day and while there are some serious cons
  (like a large data sets eating up tons of memory, crashing as a
  result, etc.) it is still an extraordinarily powerful tool.  It
  is also extremely intuitive for the basic user and insanely
  powerful for the super user who really knows how to take
  advantage of the more advanced features.  And with VBA
  integrated, it gets even more powerful.I've seen some pretty
  amazing sheets/templates put together in a few days that would
  take programmers weeks or months to put together.  And since you
  don't have to know how to program at all to use it, it's easy to
  see why it remains around.
 
  toomuchtodo - 25 minutes ago
  Someone on HN said this once, and I found it profound and have
  stolen it:Excel is the most powerful REPL in the finance
  industry, and it's ubiquitous.
 
    sheetjs - 21 minutes ago
    > Spreadsheets are the most intuitive programming environment
    known to man.https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=14039059
 
  maxxxxx - 23 minutes ago
  I can see this in my company. IT has for some reason decided to
  put some data into Hadoop. Now the users need to write spec
  documents for each little thing and every trivial report takes
  months to get done. Before they had Excel and could create
  whatever they needed in minutes. Us programmers don't always make
  life easier for end users. Often we create a level of
  bureaucracy.
 
    adambard - 17 minutes ago
    If you're putting Excel-sized data in Hadoop, something has
    gone seriously wrong in your IT department's decision-making
    process. It does make for a nice parable about the dangers of
    shiny-new-thing-syndrome though.
 
      maxxxxx - 11 minutes ago
      Yep. this is going on everywhere. How many solid but boring
      Java applications have been replaced by a microservice,
      cloud, NoSQL, NoieJS monster?
 
      jordanb - 8 minutes ago
      Not really. They could be trying to build a company-wide data
      lake. Some files in the lake will be very small, others will
      be very large. Because it's in HDFS it won't matter if the
      very small ones suddenly become very large.End users groan
      because people groan every time anything changes and they
      have to learn something new.
 
        ghostly_s - 4 minutes ago
        If users were previously empowered to do a task themselves,
        and now need to request another team do that task on their
        behalf, that's a very valid reason to be groaning IMO.
 
      sokoloff - 5 minutes ago
      RDD - "R?sum? Driven Development"
 
      sgt101 - 3 minutes ago
      Well, if you are taking many hours to process said data on a
      single processor machine (say eight cores) then throwing it
      into an environment where you can crunch it with many cores
      (say 1440) then this does make some kind of sense. Also
      putting the data into a secured multi user environment with
      redundancy and also business continuity.as opposed to fecking
      sharepoint
 
    michaelmrose - 15 minutes ago
    Anything that can be done in minutes with Excel could be done
    in relatively short order via an actual programming language.
 
      cafard - 14 minutes ago
      By accountants and financial analysts?
 
      maxxxxx - 13 minutes ago
      With Excel any reasonably capable business analyst can do
      sophisticated calculations quickly without needing anything
      else. With a web app, SQL database and whatever the ramp up
      cost is huge in comparison.
 
        michaelmrose - 8 minutes ago
        The ramp up cost isn't months vs minutes. That is just pure
        nonsense.
 
      barrkel - 9 minutes ago
      Adding a new screen to capture information? With a nice graph
      to display for output? Does it conform to your UI style
      guide? Does it have passing unit tests? Is it integration
      tested? Is it code reviewed? Any migrations necessary? Any
      business continuity ramifications? Etc.Engineering has
      overhead otherwise it's just a bunch of cowboys that are no
      better than Excel hackers - and probably worse, because they
      have a lot more rope to hang themselves.
 
      seanmcdirmid - 9 minutes ago
      Erm, they would also need a programmer at that point. More to
      the point, excel is more of a thinking tool that allows for
      lots of tinkering with real time feedback. Programming
      languages require lots of thinking up front and are not meant
      for thinking without significant augmentation (REPL, Jypiter
      notebooks).
 
        michaelmrose - 6 minutes ago
        Excel is a garbage environment and its pretty trivial to
        find environments that provide both a capable environment
        AND immediate feedback.
 
      watwut - 7 minutes ago
      It might take a time till coder has time for it. And coder
      may misunderstand requirements and needs time to get them.