GOPHERSPACE.DE - P H O X Y
gophering on hngopher.com
HN Gopher Feed (2017-11-30) - page 1 of 10
 
___________________________________________________________________
YouTube monetization analysis
267 points by m0ck
https://docs.google.com/document/d/155yNpfR7dGKuN-4rbrvbJLcJkhGa...
___________________________________________________________________
 
vlunkr - 2 hours ago
On the upside of this, I've seen lots more creators including
sponsors in the actual video. (This video brought to you by Blue
Apron) seemingly with lots of creative control over how they
present it. This seems like a much more sustainable method. Ad
blockers can't do anything about it, and they are safe from random
de monitization.On the other hand it's more work for the creator,
and for people just starting it may be impossible to convince
anyone to sponser them.
 
  tenkabuto - 1 hours ago
  Hm is anyone aware of a third-party marketplace for placing
  YouTube Creators with advertisers?
 
dbatten - 6 hours ago
Serious question: what is HTBQ+?Googling doesn't seem to turn
anything up.
 
  naz - 6 hours ago
  It seems to be a variant on LGBTQ. Except I guess with
  "Homosexual" replacing "Lesbian and Gay".
 
    Lifesnoozer - 6 hours ago
    Correct, in Sweden we call it HBTQ+, and "Karlaplan" is a
    location in Stockholm. Seems likely whoever wrote this is from
    Sweden.
 
    tantalor - 5 hours ago
    The article only uses that term in the abstract, and doesn't
    mention anything related to LGBT elsewhere. Hard to take that
    claim seriously.
 
  adsfqwop - 6 hours ago
  Must be a reference to this:https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/HBTQ
 
  [deleted]
 
  [deleted]
 
    sctb - 4 hours ago
    We've already asked you not to the guidelines with
    unsubstantive inflammatory comments. Could you please
    stop?https://news.ycombinator.com/newsguidelines.html
 
petercooper - 5 hours ago
Does YouTube let sponsors/advertisers opt-in to advertising on
"demonetized" videos at all? For example, let's say I really want
to advertise on all of a certain channel's videos.. can I do that?
Surely if I'm happy to pay money to do so, they should allow that
to happen regardless of if big-name brands like it or not.
 
  delecti - 5 hours ago
  This has been my thought as well. Adding a "sub-par" video level
  between "any ads" and "no ads" to allow less strict brands to
  advertise anywhere seems like it would help both supply and
  demand of ads. Maybe Fischer Price doesn't want to advertise on
  profanity-laden "let's plays" of gory video games, but beer
  brands probably don't care as much.
 
Sir_Cmpwn - 6 hours ago
The other day I stumbled upon this
project:https://github.com/Chocobozzz/PeerTubeIt's a federated tube
that uses ActivityPub and WebTorrent. I think this platform should
be invested in and creators should consider moving. The interests
of YouTube and its creators will never be entirely aligned.
 
  kakarot - 6 hours ago
  That's a cool project.However, to make videos with quality
  content at a reasonable frequency, many of these creators depend
  on YouTube for income or at least partial income.Any P2P /
  federated service would have to find an agreeable way to A) send
  ads in a safe and private way to each viewer B) stop people from
  manipulating the system to game ads while accurately determining
  if an ad was viewed.
 
    mtgx - 50 minutes ago
    They can use stuff like Patreon or STEEM/other tipping
    cryptocurrencies (that should be baked into the platform with
    an easy to click upvote button).Before you laugh, I've seen
    people make $1,000 a day consistently like this. And this sort
    of community is still tiny (fewer than a million people). Can
    you imagine if 100 million or a billion people could upvote
    content like that?I think something like STEEM is the future of
    content monetization.
 
    Sir_Cmpwn - 6 hours ago
    Tools like Patreon can help fill this gap.
 
      kakarot - 4 hours ago
      It's not enough. Patreon only works for certain audiences in
      its current state, and additionally lacks certain integration
      tooling that would make it more transparent.
 
      nathcd - 5 hours ago
      Also, there's no reason creators couldn't use "dumb ads"
      where they read ad copy during their videos, and sell the
      spots themselves. Seems to be the main revenue source in the
      podcast world.It feels weird to be an advocate for something
      like dumb advertising (maybe "content-targeted advertising"
      is a better name?), but dumb ads and Patreon really are a
      breath of fresh air relative to the status quo of web
      content.
 
        kakarot - 4 hours ago
        Yes, it's one thing for serial content like a podcast or
        talk show, it's another for more artistic endeavors where
        it would lesson the artistic credibility to have an ad
        ingrained into the video.It's also not a suitable format
        for those who create many small 1-5m videos.Additionally,
        it prevents you from retroactively changing what ad gets
        sent with the video, which can lead to conflicts arising
        over severed business ties, and limit your overall ability
        to make residual profit from older videos.
 
          nathcd - 3 hours ago
          > Yes, it's one thing for serial content like a podcast
          or talk show, it's another for more artistic endeavors
          where it would lesson the artistic credibility to have an
          ad ingrained into the video.> It's also not a suitable
          format for those who create many small 1-5m videos.I
          don't think having platform-handled dynamic ads (ie
          YouTube) differs from these dynamics in any meaningful
          way. The difference that matters is that with dumb ads
          the creator has complete control.> Additionally, it
          prevents you from retroactively changing what ad gets
          sent with the video, which can lead to conflicts arising
          over severed business ties, and limit your overall
          ability to make residual profit from older videos.This is
          a feature (of content-targeted advertising), not a bug.
          If a business model relies on tracking and targeting
          unknowing users who aren't aware that they can resist
          being tracked and targeted, maybe it was a crappy
          business model in the first place.
 
          kakarot - 2 hours ago
          > This is a feature (of content-targeted advertising),
          not a bug. If a business model relies on tracking and
          targeting unknowing users who aren't aware that they can
          resist being tracked and targeted, maybe it was a crappy
          business model in the first place.This is a false
          dichotomy.There exists a large, partly unexplored space
          between hard embedded pre-recorded ads and targeted
          advertising that makes use of tracking.
 
          nathcd - 1 hours ago
          Hmmm, that's a possibility I haven't considered. I
          suppose because I'm having trouble imagining what that
          in-between space looks like.If an ad is targeted at a
          user, doesn't that necessarily mean they were tracked to
          some degree (i.e. some data is known about them, and an
          ad is being shown to them based on whatever that known
          data is)? Conversely, if nothing is known about the user
          (they haven't been tracked at all), how can an ad be
          targeted at them (besides knowing they are viewing a
          webpage on a certain topic, but then we're back at being
          content-targeted)?The only possibility I can think of
          that's somewhat in-between, is a site tracking a user
          across their own site (first-party only), and targeting
          ads based on that collected data, rather than contracting
          that out to Google who can follow you across many sites.
          Is this what you have in mind? Other than this, I'm
          having trouble thinking of possibilities that exist
          between content-targeted and user-targeted via tracking.
          It's interesting to consider though.
 
          wolfgang42 - 1 hours ago
          The parent isn't arguing against content-targeted
          advertising, just pointing out that it doesn't have to be
          baked immutably into the content the way YouTube/Podcast
          sponsorship messages are.One example of this is the
          https://www.projectwonderful.com/ model of auctioning ad
          slots the same way you would sell e.g. a billboard. The
          only targeting in this model is based on demographics of
          the content's audience at large (e.g. advertising Bobcat
          in a Box on Explain XKCD).
 
    krapp - 6 hours ago
    Any form of advertising would likely be unacceptable on a
    platform like this, as would any attempt to enforce copyright
    or limit the redistribution or reuse of content. Creators would
    just have to find another way to make money and accept that
    they have no practical right to "ownership" over the content
    they upload, regardless of legality.To clarify: I don't believe
    the set of people willing to adopt a FOSS distributed peer-to-
    peer video streaming platform and the set of people who believe
    advertising to be tolerable would likely overlap enough to
    provide a better or more stable market than the existing web
    already provides. And advertising on the web is already
    breaking down and likely doomed to fail as a concept.
 
      kakarot - 4 hours ago
      >  I don't believe the set of people willing to adopt a FOSS
      distributed peer-to-peer video streaming platform and the set
      of people who believe advertising to be tolerable would
      likely overlap enough to provide a better or more stable
      market than the existing web already provides.> And
      advertising on the web is already breaking down and likely
      doomed to fail as a concept.How did you reach these two
      conclusions?
 
        krapp - 4 hours ago
        From observing the hostility towards advertising on the web
        grow and become mainstream through the adoption of ad
        blockers, and ad-driven sites (like Youtube) seeming more
        and more desperate to actually find profitability through
        advertising. It seems to me that we're approaching a
        watershed where advertising on the web just stops being
        effective.And at least, on the web, sites can enforce some
        degree of control over content and have a monetization
        strategy in place. With a decentralized platform, it's more
        difficult to integrate and guarantee the efficacy of
        advertising because it's more difficult to control the
        platform and user experience.
 
          kakarot - 2 hours ago
          I use ad-blockers to prevent arbitrary parties from
          running arbitrary code on my computer. Not because I
          detest seeing a 5-10 second ad every 20-60m worth of
          videos or seeing a small text block or banner ad or
          sponsor list off to the side.People use adblockers not
          only to block unauthorized code but because advertising
          has become an avenue for fingerprinting and tracking, and
          thus, longterm, a tool of socioeconomic oppression.
          People are also fed up with ridiculous loading times and
          payload size.I have no problem with the way certain hosts
          choose to conduct advertising on their websites and I try
          not to block advertising on their websites.There will be
          stability one day in the form of a truce between
          advertisers and end users, where lightweight, self-hosted
          static content that isn't fetched remotely clientside or
          laden with scripts will find a way to make money in the
          general market again.
 
  mburns - 3 hours ago
  Similarly, https://d.tube/ uses IPFS network to retrieve videos.
 
polskibus - 6 hours ago
Ironic that they're using Google docs platform to publish the
research. Maybe the censorship effect is not advertent?
 
  Nuzzerino - 6 hours ago
  Perhaps it is a dare for Google to make the incredibly foolish
  move of deleting the content or taking action. Even if
  technically against the terms of use to reverse engineer, taking
  action against the account would bring more negative attention to
  Google.
 
  raverbashing - 6 hours ago
  I would still make a backup, just in case
 
homero - 2 hours ago
It's true, I no longer see my gun channels in my recommended videos
 
sdsdsdsdsds - 2 hours ago
>>We used youtube?s official ?DATA API v3? to get the top 25
related videos for 100k videos. We then scraped the related videos
for information relating to monetisation status, views, etc. The
corpus containing information of the scraped videos were then
analysed in detail.Anyone knows any such list readily available? I
have been wanting to Scrape 100k video URL videos for my own
content classification. Any suggestions will be appreciated.
 
  j_s - 2 hours ago
  Have you considered the Internet Archive?Anyone where to get
  started with content classification would do well to consider
  Hands-On Machine Learning with Scikit-Learn and TensorFlow:
  Concepts, Tools, and Techniques to Build Intelligent Systems
  written by the former head of video classification at YouTube
  (https://amzn.com/B06XNKV5TS).source:
  https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=15772174
 
    sdsdsdsdsds - 1 hours ago
    I brought the book for Black Friday. Its on my december
    readling list. I will look through internet archive. Thanks!
 
wybiral - 6 hours ago
Every single video, without exception, that I've uploaded in the
past few months has been demonetized within a day or two. Then I
request manual review and they're monetized again within another
day or two.My content is clean and all of it is programming/tech
related (programming tutorials and some Raspberry Pi stuff).So if
there is an algorithm it's really naive at this stage or it doesn't
apply until you request manual review.
 
  benawad - 4 hours ago
  I make programming videos too, and a similar thing happens to me.
  The first day I release a video it's demonetized, and even if I
  don't request a manual review the video will be remonetized a
  couple days later.
 
    wybiral - 4 hours ago
    Interesting. Maybe YouTube needs to adjust their algorithm for
    that category or something.
 
      mitchty - 4 hours ago
      I'd bet this behavior is their algorithm "working as
      intended".Aka, advertisers saying they don't want to waste ad
      spend on worthless programming videos. So they get
      demonetized for the first few days to reduce the impact of
      any ad spend on the times that would be most likely to get
      views, then turn it on so the drip of ad spend can treat the
      videos like problem children.
 
        wybiral - 4 hours ago
        I'm more inclined to think that the algorithms are just a
        bit naive at this point. Surely some advertisers out there
        do want to target that market.The notice on my videos is:
        Limited or no ads due to content identified as not suitable
        for most advertisers[1]. Your video remains fully playable
        and is eligible to earn subscription revenue from YouTube
        Red.[1]
        https://support.google.com/youtube/answer/6162278?hl=en
 
          mitchty - 3 hours ago
          Sure, just curious that the videos would be monetized
          after the first few days. From what I've heard the first
          few days of a video basically makes/breaks a lot of
          videos as far as monetization goes.
 
          mintplant - 1 hours ago
          My guess is at this early stage of deployment, videos
          flagged by the algorithm to be demonetized (or a sample
          thereof) are automatically put into some manual review
          queue, for training and validation, which takes a few
          days to process through the volume.
 
        nym - 1 hours ago
        Udemy does a lot of advertising.
 
  RyanShook - 6 hours ago
  In my experience, Youtube demonetizes based on metadata. So any
  tags/descriptions with keywords that YT views as ?controversial?
  the system will demonetize regardless of actual content in the
  video.
 
    wybiral - 6 hours ago
    I uploaded a video yesterday that's already demonetized. It's
    part of a series to write an RSS feed reader in Python
    (specifically the part about adding static files to the
    server).Tags: python, rss, feedparser, feed reader, news
    aggregator, flask, css, static filesIt doesn't seem
    "controversial" to me.
 
      koolba - 5 hours ago
      You should try making the same video with a parser written in
      Golang and see if that get's demonetized as well.
 
        wybiral - 5 hours ago
        The series before this one was about Golang and they all
        got demonetized too.
 
          1_2__4 - 5 hours ago
          I'm not sure which is funnier, his comment or your
          deadpan response.
 
      superflyguy - 5 hours ago
      Feedp arse r maybe?
 
      siruncledrew - 1 hours ago
      With "flask", "python", and "feed" the NLP is assuming you
      are some kind of alcoholic snake wrangler?
 
      burger_moon - 5 hours ago
      What's a link to your channel? You've at least got me
      interested in checking it out.
 
        wybiral - 5 hours ago
        https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6tqFmkqznYJTzidBerHA8gThe
        video from yesterday (08 - CSS and static files) is still
        demonetized. If that gives you any context.
 
      ocdtrekkie - 6 hours ago
      Try without the word "news", perhaps?
 
      TheCoreh - 6 hours ago
      Perhaps "news"?
 
      lettergram - 6 hours ago
      I'm wondering if "flask" is getting flagged (as in relation
      to alcohol.Or news, because you know - "fake news"
 
        wybiral - 6 hours ago
        Maybe, but the series before that had nothing to do with
        flask or news.For instance a video in a series about
        writing a Go web app had these tags: golang, http, server,
        redis, gorilla mux, go-redis, web, application, tutorial,
        howtoAnd it was demonetized. Every single video I've
        uploaded seems to have been until I request manual review
        (which takes a couple of days).
 
      kawsper - 6 hours ago
      Do you know which excluded_ads labels it was tagged with?
 
        wybiral - 5 hours ago
        For the video I uploaded yesterday, in the source for the
        video I can see:"excluded_ads": "46=14_14; 59=14_14;
        76=2_2_1,2_2_4; 102=1_1,1_3,2_1,2_3; 106=1_1,1_2_1,1_3,2_1,
        2_2_1,2_2_4,2_3,14_14,17_2_1,17_2_4"EDIT: This may just be
        the generic variable in their source code, I'm not sure how
        to get the value specific to my video.
 
        [deleted]
 
      nana_gb - 2 hours ago
      I'm 99.9% sure it's nothing to do with your tags and
      everything to do with some sort of speech to text analysis
      google is doing on your video.In my case, I have a
      demonitized tutorial video on how to download and upgrade my
      software.I was a bit surprised since it was a basic boring
      screen share video. Nothing controversial either, until I
      looked at the auto generated close captioning.I said
      "Prosper202" but Google heard "pr0st!tut3" (I edited the
      actual word just in case HN also has auto block filters) But
      as you can see, it's obviously a not safe for brands
      keyword.I've manually fixed the closed captioning with the
      correct words, but as of now the video is still
      demonetized.So I think there's some sort of blacklist of
      words said in videos that will auto demonetize videos.In your
      case, after watching your video with closed captioning I
      notice you use the word "explicit" a lot in your video. Once
      again given the context, it's totally safe. But there's also
      a very unsafe context that I doubt google is willing to
      automatically monetize without some sort of manual review.
      (https://support.google.com/youtube/answer/6162278?hl=en)You
      can request a manual review of the affected videos, but only
      if your video has 1000 views in the past 7 days. For most
      small channels wrongly flagged, there's no real fix (for the
      old video).The only real suggestion to test out is to not say
      explicit in your next video.I'm also interested in hearing
      from others with demonetized videos, that may be suffering
      from the same auto captioning and blacklisted words issue.
 
        wybiral - 1 hours ago
        That's a good point. I've seen my captioning be WAY off
        from what I actually said.But when I request a manual
        review the videos do seem to get monetized again within a
        few days... Even with less than 1000 views.
 
  vbernat - 5 hours ago
  Some users are publishing the video as a private video first, get
  demonetized, ask for the review, the video is monetized again and
  user can publish it as a public video.
 
    falcolas - 5 hours ago
    This doesn't help people posting time-sensitive content such as
    news or reviews. Those who used to fill this niche who have
    been targeted by the algorithms are seeing upwards of 90% loss
    in revenue despite having all videos re-monitized after manual
    review.
 
    delecti - 5 hours ago
    Are you sure that's possible? I've heard that a video needs to
    be averaging a certain number of videos (something like
    1000/week) before they'll do the manual review.
 
      vbernat - 2 hours ago
      My source is this video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IM-
      gFU74UzA. This could possibly be false.
 
danjoc - 5 hours ago
Brave browser is a potential way to fight YouTube's
censorship.http://www.breitbart.com/tech/2017/11/17/brave-browser-
lets-...
 
  nasredin - 3 hours ago
  You are linking to Breitbart? Steve Bannon's yellow rag?
 
supermdguy - 2 hours ago
  Wow, this file is really popular! Some tools might be unavailable
until the crowd clears.  Even Google Docs is susceptible to the
hacker news effect.
 
  r3bl - 1 hours ago
  That is mostly a Google thing. I've seen small subreddits
  activating the same thing in Google Drive. I would say that the
  threshold might be as small as 1000 people trying to access it.
 
iainmerrick - 5 hours ago
What is "demonetization"? I've never heard of this before.Does it
mean YouTube stops inserting ads in your videos? As a viewer, that
sounds pretty great to me. It sounds like they also stop suggesting
your video to random viewers, which is understandable if they're
not making money off it.Surely the real problem is that ads are
toxic, the ad-supported content model is toxic, and YouTube's
automatic recommendations are horrible (see the recent article on
terrifying race-to-the-bottom videos for kids:
https://medium.com/@jamesbridle/something-is-wrong-on-the-
in...)Edit to clarify: yes, of course I realize that content
creators need the money. I'm just saying that this is a bad system
that often rewards bad content and punishes important-but-
uncomfortable content. Unfortunately it's almost the only system in
town. I would love to see e.g. Patreon rivaling YouTube in
revenue.Edit edit: and ads aside, relying on YouTube (Facebook,
etc) to tell us what to watch is terrible. We should instead do our
own crowd-sourced curation, aka recommend good things to each
other. And we need to defend ourselves against the likes of
Facebook and Twitter insinuating their own filters between us and
our friends.
 
  Raphmedia - 5 hours ago
  Youtube content creators rely on ads to make their living.
  Monetization (ads on videos) are managed automatically by an
  algorithm. There are a lot of false positive where people spend
  weeks working on a video and end up getting no revenue for it.I
  watch a lot of videos on world history. It happen very often that
  those YouTubers have their revenue cut off because the video is
  automatically flagged as "war", "weapons". It's ridiculous since
  those wars and weapons are those of the ancient world.Worst than
  that, recently one big user had his account outright deleted for
  talking about ninjas and their weaponry in a video uploaded
  around 10 years ago. The algorithm went through his previous
  videos and flagged his entire account as undesirable.See this
  petition where it took 35k+ users for his account to be restored.
  https://www.change.org/p/google-inc-reinstate-the-thegnthran...
 
  iagovar - 5 hours ago
  The report not only talks about that. It also talks about videos
  that, because of being demonetized, they also appear less in YT
  searches and related content.In other words, if you video has
  ads, then the probability of appearing in searches and related
  content is higher, thus you, as used, are more exposed to ads.
 
    danjoc - 5 hours ago
    >In other words, if you video has ads, then the probability of
    appearing in searches and related content is higherSo users
    that permit ads on their video get a virtual "fast lane" on the
    Comcast internet service. You know, I'm sick and tired of these
    internet service providers violating Net Neutrality
    principles.Oh, wait. It's YouTube? Oh, that's fine then./s
 
      delecti - 5 hours ago
      Youtube not providing extra promotion for content is
      different from Comcast charging extra to even access that
      content.
 
        [deleted]
 
      cerebellum42 - 3 hours ago
      Not permitting ads from the user's end doesn't even influence
      the ranking and likelihood of showing up in recommendations
      (as far as we know). It's just demonetization from Youtube's
      side that has that effect.
 
      jowsie - 1 hours ago
      You do realise you're comparing a company that makes its
      money from advertising on top of an otherwise video sharing
      platform, with a company you pay a fixed monthly fee to
      access the internet, right?
 
  rbobrowicz - 5 hours ago
  >What is "demonetization"?YouTube deciding your video is
  ineligible for earning ad revenue. So the creator gets nothing
  (or close to nothing, not sure). I'm not sure if it actually
  stops running ads on the videos since I've been using an ad
  blocker for ages.
 
    iainmerrick - 5 hours ago
    Wow, I would certainly have assumed that if they show ads, they
    must share the revenue.
 
      cerebellum42 - 3 hours ago
      If your video gets demonetized no (or much fewer) ads get
      shown. If ads are shown, revenue is shared between Youtube
      and the creator.
 
m0ck - 5 hours ago
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=n3H8D2LrLHc&feature=youtu.beThis a
video from the author with some commentary.
 
jxramos - 2 hours ago
I like how upon opening the doc I see for the first time ever "Wow,
this file is really popular! Some tools might be unavailable until
the crowd clears.Try again Dismiss" HN stressing the internet.
 
r3bl - 6 hours ago
One thing I haven't figured out from the section 2:Those tweets
claim that demonetized videos don't reach anyone on the homepage.
Do they reach anyone on the Subscriptions page?For me, the
Subscriptions page pretty much replaced the homepage, and it would
be bad for me as a consumer if the channels I subscribe to don't
end up on that page once they upload new content.Also, I'm mildly
annoyed by the lack of consistency with spelling of the word
"YouTube" in this analysis. It's neither "Youtube" nor "youtube"
(both of those spelling are used multiple times), it's YouTube.
 
adekok - 6 hours ago
I never understood why Youtube didn't have uploaders select various
categories for videos.  It would do a number of things:* allow them
to demonetize / ban / block videos for abuse of categorization*
train machine learning on the various categoriesIt's a lot more
socially palatable for Youtube to say "Hey guys, we HAVE a blood
and violence category, but you didn't use it for this video.  So
we'll punish you for that."Instead, we get programming videos
getting demonetized / blocked for god only knows what reason.  That
makes people made, and is bad press.
 
  make3 - 5 hours ago
  this would be an extremely dirty dataset, as there is no
  incentive to not put your videos in as many categories as
  possible. if you can only have one, people will still put it in
  the most popular category a large fraction of the times I'm sure,
  not the correct one
 
    jijji - 5 hours ago
    yes, it might be a better idea to let viewers of videos choose
    tags/categories and vote on these categories, than to allow the
    uploader.
 
    adekok - 5 hours ago
    > there is no incentive to not put your videos in as many
    categories as possible.We are talking about how to incentivize
    people here... why suddenly decide that there's magically "no
    incentive" for something?Youtube is free to also de-incentivize
    people for using the wrong category.
 
      pwinnski - 5 hours ago
      Which they would determine using... an automated algorithm
      which decides which category a video should be in, and
      comparing it to the category chosen. At which point...
 
        make3 - 5 hours ago
        it's not a training set anymore, but a machine learning
        production task
 
          maksimum - 3 hours ago
          Well, it's both a challenging production task (which
          Google is great at) and a learning from streaming data
          task, which Google also has some experience with e.g.
          news. The latter is certainly a interesting challenge,
          but many researchers are already working on it.
 
        adekok - 5 hours ago
        > At which point...They have more data than they do now for
        machine learning, and a better PR story.i.e. uploaders
        can't be mad about the categories, because the categories
        are chosen by the uploader.Uploaders can be mad about
        Youtube double-checking the categories and getting it
        wrong... which is less likely to happen if they have better
        data for machine learning.What, exactly, is the down side
        of that?
 
          pwinnski - 4 hours ago
          Ultimately the determination is still made by the machine
          learning process, so you're describing extra work to
          provide an interface of dubious value that will be used
          more to misrepresent video content than to provide useful
          signals, and it seems that customer support related to
          this would increase dramatically.I think Google relies
          overmuch on questionable ML in most areas, but in this
          case, the alternatives are either ridiculously expensive,
          or easily exploitable.
 
      make3 - 5 hours ago
      The implicit goal of most YouTubers is to get views, as
      that's how they make money. Putting your video in a smaller
      category/in not the max amount of category reduces your
      exposure, reducing your potential views. The incentive of
      having a lesser chance of being flagged feels tiny compared
      to that
 
  simias - 5 hours ago
  That seems like a reasonable idea to me but I think part of the
  answer is that a mind boggling amount of videos are uploaded to
  Youtube every second. Tracking categorization abuse seems
  straightforward in theory but good luck automating that reliably
  over millions of videos especially when you know that some very
  dedicated people will try their best to game the algorithm in
  their favor.People will start using the "blood and violence"
  category exclusively if it means they're less likely to be
  demonetized, rendering it useless. Or the other way around: if
  this category means they get fewer views they'll try their best
  to be always nearly avoid it, except of course it can get very
  subjective and some people are going to be flagged "blood and
  violence" even though they argue it's not that violent and
  channel XYZ did worse and didn't get tagged etc...When it come to
  moderating Youtube, and given the ridiculous amount of content
  hosted there, you shouldn't think "how would I do it" but rather
  "how would I design an algorithm that would do that". And
  suddenly it becomes a lot less obvious. You can't teach
  algorithms common sense (yet).
 
    adekok - 5 hours ago
    > Tracking categorization abuse seems straightforward in theory
    but good luck automating that reliably over millions of
    videosIs Youtube (a) automating video categorization now, or
    (b) not automating video categorization?> People will start
    using the "blood and violence" category exclusively if it means
    they're less likely to be demonetized, rendering it
    uselessNo... it means that the advertisers can determine
    whether or not they want to monetize ads in that category.So
    there would be no "demonetize EVERYTHING", just categories that
    advertisers can choose to place ads on, or not.I think you're
    assuming that a different system would work exactly the same as
    the system works today.  That isn't the point...
 
  HuggableSquare - 5 hours ago
  YouTube does actually have video categories that the uploader
  selects, although historically it has led to people mis-
  categorizing their videos on purpose.For example, before gaming
  was a category that was embraced by YouTube, many popular gaming
  creators would categorize their videos under Comedy instead of
  Gaming, because the Gaming category did not have a spot on the
  front page. This also led to a fights between gaming YouTubers
  over mis-labelling under lesser used categories just to get the
  top spot and end up on the front page.As far as I can tell the
  categories are as follows: Autos and Vehicles, Comedy, Education,
  Film & Animation, Gaming, Howto & Style, Music, News & Politics,
  Nonprofits & Activism, People & Blogs, Pets & Animals, Science &
  Technology, Sports, Travel & Events.
 
  mc32 - 4 hours ago
  Absolutely.  Flickr had a pretty good system.I think the reason
  YT avoids this is for fear of monetization loss as fewer things
  get exposed to wide audiences so there is less "vitality", and YT
  loses advert potential.If they cared about users and creators,
  they'd take a page from Flickr.
 
  dopamean - 5 hours ago
  Other commenters speculate that there is a technical reason why
  YouTube doesn't allow content producers to choose their
  monetization categories but I bet it's more likely to be a
  business reason. I'm sure it would be technically challenging and
  possibly for not much reward (for Google), however, I bet it's
  even harder to sell advertisers on ad packages that include
  Google ads when any producer can opt out of any group of ads. It
  would make it much harder to tell advertisers how many eyes their
  ads would actually make it in front of.
 
    dizzystar - 5 hours ago
    People would game the system. I do music, but everyone knows
    that other categories pay higher.It also would depend on the
    audience you naturally attract. Attracting 19 year old girls
    will do better than 65 year old men.
 
ebbv - 6 hours ago
Seems to me content creators who get upset at their treatment by
Youtube have made a serious mistake; they believe they are
Youtube's customers. They are not. Neither are the people watching
the videos. The advertisers are the customers, just like most other
Google services. You are the product. If you don't like it, you
need to switch to a platform where you are the customer and the
provider cares about you on that level. Google never will.
 
  falcolas - 5 hours ago
  I don't think they're under that misunderstanding. However, they
  correctly believe that they are the hook which pulls in viewers -
  the product - to sell to advertisers.Take away those hooks by
  removing their incentive to post videos, and you pull in fewer
  viewers, resulting in fewer ad sales to YouTube's
  customers.Sadly, the most affected are those who cover niche
  categories, which means YouTube can afford to fuck it up and not
  feel any significant pain. (Yes, I consider 90% loss in revenue
  for their bait, err, content creators to be worthy of the phrase
  "fucking it up").
 
    krapp - 4 hours ago
    >Yes, I consider 90% loss in revenue for their bait, err,
    content creators to be worthy of the phrase "fucking it up"I'm
    not certain Google are "fucking it up," or at least, that this
    effect isn't intentional. How much revenue do those niche
    creators generate for Google? How much first party content do
    they include, that media companies might object to? Google may
    consider them to be a risk not worth the reward if their intent
    is to optimize their algorithm to prefer first-party commercial
    content, in order to increase the value of their platform to
    advertisers.The existing system clearly hasn't been working for
    Google, so to me it seems more likely that the apparent
    failures of its algorithms are part of an attempt to forcibly
    pivot the platform while maintaining good PR. I could be wrong,
    though.
 
      falcolas - 4 hours ago
      It comes down to what do you (or what should Google) value
      more:Varied content covering a broad range of topics, pulling
      in broad and varied audiencesorGoogle's short-term bottom
      line.Personally, I value the former, which is why I think
      that Google is doing it wrong. Focusing exclusively on the
      bottom line doesn't help society, doesn't even really help
      companies in the long run. If you fire your entire R&D team,
      you'll goose the bottom line, at the cost of your company's
      future. If you (effectively) fire your content creators, you
      endanger the future of your video platform.Everyone yells
      "Patreon" as the solution for content creators, but this is a
      bad thing for Google. It removes their control over the
      content creators by removing the biggest form of "stickiness"
      to the platform.Twitch started out as a platform for gaming
      live streams. Youtube is demonetizing gaming videos. It's
      creating conditions ripe for an exodus of gamers (creators
      and viewers) from YouTube.
 
eref - 6 hours ago
I think it is right to ?soft?-censor in this way (i.e. the
information is accessible but not promoted). Reality without
sorting and filters would be inhuman because market incentives to
grab people?s attention would maximally exploit our tribal
instincts and thereby completely destabilize our societies. This is
already happening and it needs to stop immediately.
 
  jakebasile - 6 hours ago
  Who decides what to filter? How are they elected?
 
    [deleted]
 
  golemotron - 6 hours ago
  There will always be a problem because people promote for vanity
  and status as well as economics. You can't get more human than
  that.The next 5 years will be tech companies panicking and trying
  to impose social control vs. people becoming more aware of when
  they are being manipulated by other users (and censored by
  platforms) and opting out of platforms entirely and/or moving to
  less controlled platforms. Internet media will be seen like
  smoking and candy bar consumption are seed today. Some people
  will eat candy bars every day because they don't care about their
  health. Others will choose to be healthier and it will happen by
  increasing awareness rather than heavy handedness.
 
  moduspol - 1 hours ago
  Agreed. I mean, Russia already verifiably tried to influence the
  2016 election, right?Maybe the algorithm can be adjusted to not
  promote content that aligns with Russian interests. That way we
  can ensure people are only seeing the perspectives we want them
  to.
 
  JohnStrange - 6 hours ago
  You don't have to go that far to justify demonetization. It's a
  way to encourage higher quality content in contrast to low
  quality clickbait and sensationalism. That's good for the users
  and also in Youtube's long-term interest. On a side note, that's
  not censorship at all, neither hard nor soft censorship, it's
  just a kind of automated editorial work.
 
    ksk - 43 minutes ago
    >It's a way to encourage higher quality content in contrast to
    low quality clickbait and sensationalism.Maybe its higher
    quality, but you will essentially get the same type of content
    you already get on cable. Its content that has the potential to
    be popular, is bland enough that advertisers don't mind seeing
    their logo on the content, and is conducive to people buying
    things that the advertisers are selling.YouTube is going the
    way of being just another cable provider. They flirted with the
    "community" aspect for a while, but in the end decided they
    care much more about advertisers. Which is fair enough, IMO.
 
alva - 5 hours ago
I am almost certain another factor is clickthrough from
"undesirable" referral links. ReviewBrah [0] (The Report of The
Week) is the most family friendly channel with high subscribers
that I can think of. He reviews fast food and has a unique fashion
style and personality. Very clean.He has become a popular meme and
is regularly linked to from 4chan. I struggle to find a single
thing that could warrant demonetisation (having looked through the
youtube guidance), yet a large chunk of his videos are
automatically demonetised.[0]
https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCeR0n8d3ShTn_yrMhpwyE1Q
 
  corey_moncure - 5 hours ago
  Of course, this would mean that YT has handed 4chan a laser
  cannon to demonetize videos at their discretion.
 
    IceDane - 5 hours ago
    Someone will read these comments and it will be posted on 4chan
    within a few minutes, if it hasn't been already.
 
      Bromskloss - 5 hours ago
      We might as well start posting suggestions for targets right
      away.
 
    bballard - 2 hours ago
    So you're telling me there's a way we might demonetize "kinder
    playtime", "hailey's magical playhouse", "funtoys", and "toys
    unlimited"?THAT is a noble cause! Gimme the sixty-five. I'm on
    the job!
 
      SebastianFrelle - 2 hours ago
      Could you elaborate on what these channels are and why you
      would want them demonetized? Are their videos actually
      sponsored by Disney et.al.?
 
        sergiotapia - 22 minutes ago
        MK ultra training.
 
        deadmetheny - 2 hours ago
        https://gizmodo.com/youtubes-creepy-kid-problem-was-worse-
        th...Basically, it ranges from use of copyrighted
        characters, attempts to game the autofill system, said
        characters doing weird and non-child-friendly shit, and
        actual exploitation of children.
 
  ZeroGravitas - 3 hours ago
  I think you're over-generalizing from one example. I follow a few
  differnt channels that are totally harmless and boring, and they
  all complain about demonitization.It seems like the algorithm
  just defaults strongly towards demonitization. Maybe it will
  learn and get better, but at the moment lots of things are
  getting demonitized.
 
    philipov - 1 hours ago
    To me, it sounds like what's really happening is that the
    amount of content has vastly outstripped the amount of
    available, ahem, monetization.
 
  syrrim - 45 minutes ago
  Another hypothesis I've heard that would explain the same effect
  is that youtube groups uploaders with the preferences of their
  viewers. If someone has lots of viewers who also watch videos of
  undesirable topics, that uploader will be considered undesirable
  as well.
 
    dopamean - 20 minutes ago
    Is there a name for this type of "guilty by association"
    algorithm?
 
  DerfNet - 5 hours ago
  The only other factor I can think of with ReviewBrah is that he's
  often negatively reviewing products from huge companies (fast
  food chains) that might advertise on YouTube. Would Burger King
  want to run an ad before he reviews chicken fries or whatever?
 
    benbenolson - 4 hours ago
    There are a huge number of other food reviewers that don't have
    the same issues with demonitization, even if they have slightly
    less ad-friendly content. That said, it's a good suggestion;
    it's much easier to find a way to shoot down your suggestion
    than it is to think of it.
 
      softawre - 4 hours ago
      > it's much easier to find a way to shoot down your
      suggestion than it is to think of it.words of wisdom, I would
      do well to remember them.
 
    halflings - 3 hours ago
    Criticising products is totally fine, otherwise all video game
    or movie reviewers would be demonized. Demonetization is for
    "upsetting" content from a brand perspective (terrorism,
    catastrophe, sex, violence, ...), but the models get it wrong
    from time to time.
 
  wybiral - 5 hours ago
  Or it's possible that people from those sources report his
  videos.But my own videos get demonetized almost instantly and
  none of mine have weird referral links as far as I can tell.
 
    benbenolson - 4 hours ago
    Good point, it very well could be. However, I'm inclined to
    think that this isn't the case, solely from how much positive
    feedback he gets, as well as how little negative comments he
    gets. I mean, finding a negative comment about ReviewBrah on
    any of the Chans is nigh impossible.
 
      wybiral - 3 hours ago
      Predicting the behavior of 4chan seems nigh impossible to me.
 
DonHopkins - 4 hours ago
I thought this was about the demonization algorithm that youtube
comment bots use to cyberbully people.
 
[deleted]
 
staltz - 6 hours ago
Who is Karlaplan? And why choose Google Docs to share information
which Google may dislike and remove?
 
  flgr - 5 hours ago
  I was wondering if they might not be baiting Google into doing
  that. If they start removing content critical of them from Google
  Docs that's another big story.
 
  [deleted]
 
  Phlarp - 4 hours ago
  Solid game theory on both sides. The Demonitization bot and its
  shenanigans are well known in the Youtube content creator
  community. They know they aren't fooling anyone and this data is
  going to be "out there" along with countless anecdotes from
  content creators who reliably upload content only to have it get
  "demonetized" during the most profitable portion of a video's
  lifespan. (the first 48 hours)If Google pulled the doc they'd
  likely get a lesson in the Streisand effect, and they likely know
  not to try. Posting it on Google docs is actually smart bait by
  the author in my opinion-- intentional or otherwise.
 
libeclipse - 6 hours ago
> This will in turn lead to censorship of political ideologies,
HTBQ+, mental health awareness, suicide awareness and prevention,
etc.Sounds like a slippery slope argument.
 
  carnifexetal - 6 hours ago
  Mate. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Slippery_slope#Non-
  fallacious_...
 
  ksk - 41 minutes ago
  My Subaru has four wheels just like a Ferrari.
 
  arkitaip - 24 minutes ago
  Mental health awareness channels already have their videos
  demonetized. Whatever strategy Google is using, it's afflicting
  every community on youtube regardless of topic covered, whether
  they are left or right, etc.