GOPHERSPACE.DE - P H O X Y
gophering on hngopher.com
HN Gopher Feed (2017-11-29) - page 1 of 10
 
___________________________________________________________________
American Airlines Accidentally Let Too Many Pilots Take Off the
Holidays
54 points by huac
https://www.npr.org/sections/thetwo-way/2017/11/29/567286235/oop...
___________________________________________________________________
 
Xenos_Ender - 11 minutes ago
Curious... considering the consolidation of the airlines industry,
wouldn't that affect the ability for the market to absorb the
excess demand? (Assuming the other major airlines are saturated...)
 
simonjgreen - 10 minutes ago
Same thing happened to Ryanair recently as well.
 
ratsimihah - 2 minutes ago
"Arbitrary passengers above the age of 18 years old will be
designated as pilots upon boarding by the same software who
scheduled vacations. Merry Christmas to everyone!"
 
mig39 - 39 minutes ago
Do they use the same software as
Ryanair?http://www.bbc.com/news/business-41298931
 
  cbhl - 6 minutes ago
  American Airlines created their own computer system (SABRE) in
  the 60s. It spun off into its own company in the
  2000s.https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sabre_Corporation
 
XR0CSWV3h3kZWg - moments ago
Who uses ya'll as opposed to y'all? What would ya'll even be an
abbreviation for?
 
moonka - 33 minutes ago
>We have reserve pilots to help cover flying in December, and we
are paying pilots who pick up certain open trips 150 percent of
their hourly rate ? as much as we are allowed to pay them per the
contractInteresting that there is a maximum rate.>In a post to its
website, the union warned its members that because "management
unilaterally created their solution in violation of the contract,
neither APA nor the contract can guarantee the promised payment of
the premium being offered."Looks like the pilots trust AA less than
I do when they promise vouchers.
 
  maxxxxx - 26 minutes ago
  "we are paying pilots who pick up certain open trips 150 percent
  of their hourly rate "In most tech companies they would maybe
  give you an extra pizza but certainly no extra pay.
 
    save_ferris - 18 minutes ago
    Not necessarily, a company I used to work for had to lay off a
    significant chunk of engineering but paid out big bonuses to
    those who stayed on. If there's a shortage of labor to do the
    job, money is a pretty easy way to simplify the problem.It's
    not a direct comparison, but then again, the jobs are pretty
    different to begin with.
 
      s73ver_ - 16 minutes ago
      Money is the easiest way, but it seems like it's always the
      way of last resort, after everything else has been tried, and
      those things have blown up in their face.
 
    [deleted]
 
    ratsimihah - moments ago
    In most tech companies base salary is already 150 percent of
    the average salary.
 
    chrisseaton - 22 minutes ago
    That's because most tech companies pay a salary rather than an
    hourly rate.
 
      user5994461 - 17 minutes ago
      Isnt't a salary just a predefined quota of hours and rate?
 
        Alupis - 16 minutes ago
        > Isnt't a salary just a predefined quota of hours and
        rate?That depends on one's employment contract.
 
        vanadium - 13 minutes ago
        In most companies I've been exposed to, it's the _minimum_
        expected effort for the rate.It's also why one of the first
        career mentorship steps I go through with Juniors is
        calculating their hourly rate with the assumption of 40
        hours a week (per the ostensible employee agreement), and
        then calculating it against the _real_ hours worked per
        week after taking a position.You'd be surprised how
        illuminating that's been to those Juniors, and how much of
        an imprint it left on those folks as they progressed in
        their careers. A lot of people in our industry genuinely
        don't recognize how much they devalue themselves and
        diluting their hourly rate when they're putting in 60-80
        hours a week.
 
        dragonwriter - 11 minutes ago
        Generally, no, especially for tech workers at common
        Silicon Valley pay scales, which are exempt under state and
        federal wage and hour laws.But lower-base-pay non-exempt
        employees sometimes are quoted a salary but with terms that
        make it a predefined quota of hours and rate that is in
        practice more like an hourly rate; these positions usually
        have paid leave so that, unless the leave is exhausted, it
        mostly only differs from a pure salary in that overtime is
        paid, either at straight, time-and-half, or double pay,
        depending on labor law and contract terms.
 
        chrisseaton - 3 minutes ago
        No I think a salaried employee is a professional and
        supposed to put in the hours required to get the job done,
        within reason. For example if a client has come to see you
        and your boss wants to take everyone for a work dinner you
        wouldn't say 'sorry it's after hours' - you're paid full
        time and you're supposed to be there as required, and you
        don't quibble about the hours, within reason. Where as an
        hourly employee would say 'sorry I'm off the clock'.