GOPHERSPACE.DE - P H O X Y
gophering on hngopher.com
HN Gopher Feed (2017-11-28) - page 1 of 10
 
___________________________________________________________________
Western Digital Plans to Ship More Than One Billion RISC-V Cores a
Year
156 points by deepnotderp
https://www.wdc.com/about-wd/newsroom/press-room/2017-11-28-west...
1-28-western-digital-to-accelerate-the-future-of-next-generation-computing-architectures-for-big-data-and-fast-data-environmen
___________________________________________________________________
 
microcolonel - 2 hours ago
I think the level of industry enthusiasm for RISC-V is so palpable,
in part, because the messaging from day one has been unequivocally:
RISC-V will be the standard ISA for every form factor, in every
market.Can't wait to put a RISC-V SBC in my ThinkPad X220 chassis.
:- )
 
  mr_spothawk - 2 hours ago
  > a RISC-V SBC in my ThinkPad X220 chassisafk, changing pants
 
  anderspitman - 46 minutes ago
  I'm so excited that we're feasibly within a year or two of being
  able to develop embedded devices in Rust[0] on RISC-V
  microcontrollers [1] running on open source RTOSes also written
  in Rust[2]. It's currently already possible but still requires
  quite a bit of hacking. Plus the RF stacks (Bluetooth in
  particular) aren't there yet. What a time to be a developer. PS
  RISC-V on my X220 wouldn't hurt either.[0]
  http://blog.japaric.io/quickstart/[1]
  https://www.sifive.com/products/hifive1/[2]
  https://www.tockos.org/
 
jstewartmobile - 1 hours ago
I guess this will be nice for industry, which may pass the savings
along to the consumer, but as far as having auditable hardware that
you have some control over, I don't see how this is any better than
the ARM SoCs we already have--unless you're going to roll your own
system on an FPGA.That, and I'm kind of disappointed everyone has
drunk the RISC kool-aid.  I think a lot of RISC "performance" has
more to do with compilers catering to the least common denominator
than anything else.  If you had a language/compiler that took
better advantage of a stack architecture, or even a CISC
architecture, the performance would probably be just as good if not
better.I was particularly impressed by Baker's old paper[0] on
stack architectures in service of his Linear Lisp idea.[0]
http://home.pipeline.com/~hbaker1/ForthStack.html
 
  pkaye - 1 hours ago
  RISC-V benefits is mostly an open source license that is free of
  patents. I think the biggest reason for it is academic... there
  needs to be an open platform for academic research. I'm sure it
  is next to impossible for an average university to do that on ARM
  or x86 architecture.
 
    nabla9 - 1 hours ago
    RISC-V is just ISA. I don't think ISA's can be patented. Just
    some specific instructions.
 
      pkaye - 1 hours ago
      Yes, they did the research for prior art to make sure that is
      the case for their instruction set.
 
    jstewartmobile - 1 hours ago
    Were there any academic obstructions to OpenRISC or OpenSPARC?
 
      anderspitman - 52 minutes ago
      https://riscv.org/2014/10/why-not-build-on-openrisc/
 
  [deleted]
 
H99189 - 2 hours ago
I like the idea behind RISC-V's open architecture but I had a
question.  Does it do or even try to do anything about the cloud of
uncertainty surrounding Intel ME and the AMD equivalent in x86?
 
  microcolonel - 2 hours ago
  I don't think it necessarily addresses that concern, but Machine
  mode might be the right place to address the concerns which ME
  addresses on a RISC-V machine; which means that it's at least
  more likely that it'll be programmable on whatever machine you're
  looking at.Just a thought though, it could really go any way. The
  nice thing though, is that you'll have more than two vendors,
  which means that the niche of PSP/ME paranoids may be large
  enough to address for a smaller designer, or through a limited
  run of licensed design (like SiFive's).
 
    sverige - 2 hours ago
    I'm one of the paranoids.  This is one of the main things I'm
    hoping for.  Is there any indication of what price point such
    chips might be offered at?  I have no idea how much it costs to
    set up fabrication, etc., but it seems like ARM chips have done
    very well.
 
      erikj - 1 hours ago
      ARM chips have a much higher production volume so they are
      going to be much cheaper than RISC-V chips, at least for the
      foreseeable future.
 
      pjc50 - 1 hours ago
      How long is a piece of string?It depends entirely on features
      and performance. Like Intel and arm chips have a 10x range of
      cost.
 
  garmaine - 1 hours ago
  There is a security working group. If you are concerned about
  this I highly recommend joining the foundation as an individual
  (or getting your employer to join), and asking to be put on that
  WG.It?s a critically important question and it requires active
  grassroots involvement to make sure that we don?t end up with a
  mere clone of ME, or worse a ?better ME.?
 
  pjc50 - 1 hours ago
  That depends on the manufacturer. There's no reason such a thing
  has to be there.A lot of people are hoping that someone will put
  in the work to bring the architecture up to speeds competitive
  with i7 and mass-manufacture it, despite being legally cloneable.
 
    StillBored - 10 minutes ago
    I'm not much of a RISC-V guy, but using the arch doesn't
    require you to open up your design (the arch is basically BSD).
    So, someone who puts the effort into making a super fast risc-v
    core will still have an advantage over most everyone else as
    the effort required to create a fast core is a lot different
    from the effort required to just get something that works.So,
    the devices can't just be "cloned" without the RTL/etc for the
    design, and even if someone got some masks or the RTL via an
    illicit source it would still be copyrighted enough to keep
    them from selling the clones..Of course if "clone" means you
    spend hundreds of millions of dollars building your own
    competitive core, then yes that is still allowed..
 
  pedroaraujo - 2 hours ago
  RISC-V is not an architecture, it is just an instruction set.
  People still need to design the architecture for an
  implementation of RISC-V.Intel ME is a co-processor that runs at
  the same time as the main processor, it is not related to the
  instruction set.To answer your question: Intel ME is a problem
  that happens on an higher level than the document that defines
  instruction set.
 
    fulafel - 1 hours ago
    There are "instruction set architecture" and
    "microarchitecture" (=specific implementation of an ISA). ISA
    is the one more commonly referred to as just architecture, I
    think.
 
ac29 - 1 hours ago
Presentation slides: http://innovation.wdc.com/downloads/RISC-V-Pre
sentation.pdfPresentation brief slides:
http://innovation.wdc.com/downloads/RISC-V-Presentation-Brie...
 
  gbrown_ - 48 minutes ago
  Talk about buzzword bingo.
 
    eeZah7Ux - 13 minutes ago
    It's almost a parody.
 
sverige - 2 hours ago
I haven't been following the RISC-V story too closely, possibly
because I didn't want to get my hopes up only to be dashed.  From
the article, it sounds like these cores will be developed solely
for use in data storage.  Can someone with more knowledge tell
whether this will help provide the kind of production volume needed
to make consumer products (like laptops and desktops) more likely
to be viable?  Are general purpose chips likely to be one result of
the development of RISC-V, or have I missed something fundamental?
 
  garmaine - 1 hours ago
  You should read up on SiFive.
 
    ac29 - 1 hours ago
    Specifically their Freedom products [0], which are multicore,
    1GHz+ CPUs, with support for standard interfaces like PCIe 3.0,
    USB 3.0, GbE, DDR3/4.... and ship with Linux support.Not about
    to disrupt Intel, AMD, or ARM in the laptop/desktop/server
    space just yet, but relatively high performance, modern RISC-V
    SoCs are definitely out there.[0]
    https://www.sifive.com/products/freedom/
 
      zokier - 21 minutes ago
      > and ship with Linux supportJust to point out that they are
      not actually shipping that fancy HW yet, with or without
      Linux support. It might materialize one day, but that day is
      not today.
 
  Symmetry - 1 hours ago
  Probably we won't be seeing RISC-V application processors for
  quite a while.  There's a lot of stuff that can just be
  recompiled but there's also a lot of hand-tuned assembly that
  goes into making a JIT or media codec fast.  That's why we're
  seeing initial adoption in the embedded space, where either
  there's just a small amount of code to recompile or you were
  going to rewrite the assembly anyways for the next product.In the
  long run using RISC-V in a laptop is a possibility.  And there
  might be some limited production $2000 500MHz FOSS laptop
  soonish.  But in 15 years, say, I could see RISC-V being where
  ARM is now.
 
  mtgx - 1 hours ago
  It helps that the ISA is supported in more places, even if for
  awareness alone. Compare where ARM was 10 years ago, where it was
  5 years ago, and now we're discussing having competitive
  alternatives to Intel and AMD in servers.As new developments seem
  to happen at an accelerated pace, RISC-V should also see more
  accelerated adoption. It won't take 30 years to get get to where
  ARM is today. Maybe only 10, or less.
 
  wmf - 1 hours ago
  whether this will help provide the kind of production volume
  needed to make consumer products (like laptops and desktops) more
  likely to be viable?It probably won't, despite a lot of wishful
  thinking to the contrary.Are general purpose chips likely to be
  one result of the development of RISC-V, or have I missed
  something fundamental?Out of the whole RISC-V ecosystem it looks
  like only SiFive is working on that, so it will take time.
 
    guelo - 1 hours ago
    The announcement does say "we are providing all of our RISC-V
    logic work to the community." Whatever that means.
 
      garmaine - 1 hours ago
      It means essentially ?open source,? its just that this time
      the source code is in a hardware definition language.
 
    microcolonel - 1 hours ago
    > Out of the whole RISC-V ecosystem it looks like only SiFive
    is working on that, so it will take time.If you look at
    Qualcomm's strategy with x86 competition (using Dynamic Binary
    Translation), it's not hard to imagine that they might consider
    building RISC-V application processors; especially once they've
    proven their ability to deliver enough compatibility and
    performance with DBT to compete on ISAs for which their device
    is not licensed (and especially if they are sued by Intel and
    win, one of those things where you'd jump for joy if you saw a
    C&D in the mail).
 
csense - 1 hours ago
From the headline, I would guess WD is putting a user accessible
CPU in each of their disk drives, idea being that if you have a CPU
living close to the drive, then e.g. map+reduce workloads can be
more efficiently executed.  Instead of going with ARM or Intel, I
guess the CPU's are using some less famous architecture called
RISC-V.Then I read the article, and the article is so full of
buzzwords and genericisms that after reading the whole thing, I
don't know if this guess is correct.
 
  Dylan16807 - 32 minutes ago
  Hard drives already have moderately powerful processors in them.
  So there's no reason to assume any change in feature set.
 
  zokier - 28 minutes ago
  > Western Digital plans to transition future core, processor, and
  controller development to the RISC-V architecture. The company
  currently consumes over one billion processor cores on an annual
  basis across its product portfolio. The transition will occur
  gradually and once completely transitioned, Western Digital
  expects to be shipping two billion RISC-V cores annuallyI think
  that paragraph captures pretty well what they are doing;
  basically swapping out their current (proprietary) cores for
  RISC-V cores. I don't see any indication that the processors
  would be any more user accessible than current controllers.
  Considering the numbers presented, simply doubling the number of
  cores seems fairly conservative estimate, they will probably do
  that without any major paradigm shifts.
 
  sjburt - 22 minutes ago
  It doesn't seem so. I think they're just switching the internal
  processors that do LBA translation, error correction, bad-block
  marking etc over to RISC. And then their marketing department
  took that decision and ran with it in a completely different
  direction.The key line is "... transitioning its own consumption
  of processors ? over one billion cores per year ? to RISC-V."
 
    nimish - 13 minutes ago
    Far more likely is that the SSD controllers that WD-SanDisk
    will create (that are the value-add difference between
    commodity NAND and good SSDs) will now use RISC-V cores.
    Samsung has a 5-core controller in its drives; I would guess
    that licensing costs are a pretty hefty chunk of the BOM for
    creating the controller
 
    joezydeco - 16 minutes ago
    ...which is a message to investors meaning "we're dropping the
    cost of our product without dropping prices".If that ARM
    license is half a dollar, a billion devices per year is a lot
    of profit.
 
  Symmetry - 51 minutes ago
  In order to move the reader head inside your drive and to
  communicate with the host CPU you need microprocessors in your
  hard driver, really tiny ones.  Now, instead of paying ARM for
  licences to use them WD is using open source processors that
  don't come with fees besides what it takes to manufacture them.
 
    tyingq - 12 minutes ago
    This is the right answer...they already use ARM, they want a
    one-time-fee license instead of royalties.  Trying to shave a
    little margin.
 
technofiend - 33 minutes ago
I haven't dug through all the marketing speak yet but this seems
like it's tangentially related to WD's He8 converged servers
they've been sampling, which were ARM-based and ran Debian Jessie.
[0]  Although when I saw them spoke about in Redhat Summit of
course they were mooted to be running RHEL. It would be interesting
to see if WD Labs is now sampling RISC-V-based boards running
Redhat and Ceph OSD software which like the He8.I found the whole
concept of on-board PCB with dual gig ethernet ports fascinating
and I believe there's a second generation with faster network
speeds.  Unfortunately WD never seem to have gone mainstream with
it.[0] http://ceph.com/geen-categorie/500-osd-ceph-cluster/
 
milesf - 29 minutes ago
I remember RISC's back in the late 80's/early 90's. CISC's bullied
them away and we've been stuck in Intel's quagmire every since.
Anytime there's an attack on the status quo, the established
players feign concern and beat back the attack then return to the
way things were (remember Negroponte's $100 laptop and the netbook
response?)No idea how this will pan out.
 
  zokier - 26 minutes ago
  RISCV is pretty far from attacking Intel anywhere. ARM is the one
  that should be both worried about RISCV and simultaneously be a
  cause of worry for Intel.
 
  tzahola - 21 minutes ago
  >CISC's bullied them away and we've been stuck in Intel's
  quagmire every sinceYou know that ARM means Advanced RISC
  Machine, right?
 
  astrodust - 20 minutes ago
  It wasn't that CISC won or that RISC lost, it was that the
  architectures got so blurry you couldn't tell one from the other.
  There's so much microcode in a CPU now that the instruction set
  is just the icing layer on the cake. Internally there's
  surprising amounts of commonality between PowerPC, ARM and x86
  type chips.Plus PowerPC started to adopt CISC-like instructions,
  x86-64 started to adopt RISC-like features such as having a
  multitude of generic registers, and here we are where nobody
  cares about the distinction.Don't forget that while Intel won in
  certain markets, like notebooks, desktops and servers, it's
  absolutely, utterly irrelevant in other places that ship far, far
  more CPUs. A typical car may have as many as one hundred CPUs of
  various types, typically at least fifty, many of them PowerPC for
  power and legacy reasons. Your phone is probably ARM. Remote
  controls. Routers. Switches. Refrigerators. Thermostats.
  Televisions and displays. Hard drives. Keyboards and mice.
  Basically anything that needs some kind of compute capability
  probably has a non-Intel processor.If there's a quagmire we're
  stuck in it's that we're surrounded by thousands of devices that
  are likely full of vulnerabilities that can never, will ever be
  fixed.
 
  deepnotderp - 15 minutes ago
  Well, modern x86 "CISC" implementations are basically RISC
  internally with a translation layer on top of it.
 
Numberwang - 2 hours ago
I have not been following this, what are the advantages?
 
  linkregister - moments ago
  It's a bid deal for RISC-V enthusiasts, who are delighted to see
  it in consumer products.
 
  microcolonel - 1 hours ago
  Smaller designs, easier to license designs, simpler and more
  attractive ISA extension mechanisms, no royalties, no license
  negotiation periods, no incremental cost to adding more cores of
  different designs.
 
  tw04 - 1 hours ago
  For you as an end-user?  Nothing.  For WD?  They escape paying
  ARM licensing fees on every drive.  They'll see an extra couple
  points of margin on every hard drive they sell.
 
asb - 26 minutes ago
If you're interested in what's going on at the RISC-V Workshop, you
might want to follow my live blog here:
http://www.lowrisc.org/blog/2017/11/seventh-risc-v-workshop-...
 
nolanpro - 1 hours ago
"RISC" is a terrible name for anything related to computing
 
  pavlov - 1 hours ago
  Advanced RISC Machines (ARM) doesn't seem to have suffered from
  the association.
 
0xFFC - 2 hours ago
 This was what I exactly predicted one year ago. Risk-V ISA is
coming for all of them{x86,arm,mips}.And this is very smart move by
WD to jump into Risk-V wagon.Update: Why do people downvote? I
honestly don?t understand.
 
  s-macke - 45 minutes ago
  Even though I see no reason to vote you down, there are a lot of
  reasons not to vote you up.The message from WD is very good news
  for RISC-V. But to make the claim that it overthrows  all other
  architectures from the throne is not only a bit daring. With this
  logic, ARM should have crashed Intel a long time ago. There will
  always be a market for different architectures.You have also
  misspelled RISC-V, indicating that you are not really aware of
  the market and architecture.
 
    0xFFC - 32 minutes ago
    Did you read even my comment?Where did i claim this?>ut to make
    the claim that it overthrows all other architectures from the
    throne is not only a bit daringIt is always fascinating how
    much people do extrapolate when the want to believe something.
    It is going to overthrow and it is overthrown is two quite
    different thing if you can think critically.>You have also
    misspelled RISC-V, indicating that you are not really aware of
    the market and architectureAgain. This just like you other
    analysis, which is based on flawed logic and not being
    intelligent enough.Rest assured I have wrote enough Chisel, and
    I would bet I am more familiar about interenal of most
    architecture than most people in topic (since my grad school
    work is focused on outputing chisel via LLVM).One extra lesson
    for you: dont extrapolate and judge based on appearance. Look
    at what they are saying deep down.And don?t based your
    judgement on spelling, particularly in unofficial context. Some
    people only have time to comment when they ar in bus or
    something.
 
      s-macke - 19 minutes ago
      I have tried to explain to you why your message might have
      been down voted. Nothing else. If I interpret your message
      that way, others will do the same.
 
  topspin - 1 hours ago
  Yes, this mod behavior is pretty astonishing.  microcolonel's
  comment is getting downvoted as well for no apparent reason.I
  guess there are RISC-V haters...?  Good grief.
 
    0xFFC - 1 hours ago
    Yeah exactly. I would say this is very informative comment but
    sadly gets downvoted:>>Smaller designs, easier to license
    designs, simpler and more attractive ISA extension mechanisms,
    no royalties, no license negotiation periods, no incremental
    cost to adding more cores of different designs.
 
  phkahler - 1 hours ago
  >> Why do people downvote?Because they can't handle the fact that
  you're right. RISC-V is coming for all of them. I like your
  phrasing too, it's accurate but I guess people think it's more
  pretentious. Only time will tell for sure.
 
    pjc50 - 1 hours ago
    There's a lot of wishful thinking involved in this. It's like
    Linux on the desktop: doable but very much a fringe thing.
 
      garmaine - 1 hours ago
      Why is it any more fringe than, say, hoping for an ARM
      laptop?
 
        wmf - 1 hours ago
        ARM laptops already exist BTW using smartphone SoCs. The
        R&D has already been done and paid for.A RISC-V server or
        desktop processor would have to be created essentially from
        scratch.
 
          phkahler - 25 minutes ago
          >> A RISC-V server or desktop processor would have to be
          created essentially from scratch.I'd love to see AMD or
          Intel build a chip on the RISC-V instruction set and use
          all their existing infrastructure around that. I would
          not be surprised it they could achieve higher benchmark
          performance than their x86 offerings. For someone else to
          achieve the same level of performance will take a while,
          but there are multiple groups working on it.
 
        ansible - 24 minutes ago
        There are a few ARM based Chromebooks.  In many cases, it
        isn't too hard to put regular Linux on them.
 
        zokier - 17 minutes ago
        Because ARM laptops have been shipping for years, while
        there isn't even a single RISC-V SoC out there that could
        even hypothetically be used in a laptop.
 
      phkahler - 54 minutes ago
      >> There's a lot of wishful thinking involved in this.Yeah I
      agree, but the list of giant companies involved in the
      wishing is what makes it seem like more than a pipe dream.
      Just think how much revenue ARM will lose when WD, nVidia,
      Samsung and others all switch to RISC-V in their embedded
      devices.
 
flamedoge - 17 minutes ago
everybody makes processors!
 
erikj - 1 hours ago
So WD is switching their hardware to in-house designed processors
after purchasing a RISC-V developer, do I understand this press
release correctly?
 
  microcolonel - 36 minutes ago
  WD had already been a RISC-V foundation member before their
  involvement with Esperanto Technologies (who has also been a
  member for a while). I suspect they saw Esperanto's portfolio and
  team after meeting at one of the workshops, and bought into it
  because of preexisting interest in RISC-V.Just to be clear, I
  think they bought into Esperanto, but I don't think they acquired
  it. Much public communication implies that Esperanto Technologies
  is still generally autonomous[0][1].[0]:
  https://twitter.com/rickbmerritt/status/935600820300713985[1]:
  https://twitter.com/EsperantoTech/status/935598028773138432