GOPHERSPACE.DE - P H O X Y
gophering on hngopher.com
HN Gopher Feed (2017-11-28) - page 1 of 10
 
___________________________________________________________________
Lessons we learned while bootstrapping
175 points by brianjackson
https://kinsta.com/blog/bootstrapping-startup/
___________________________________________________________________
 
wheresmyusern - 4 hours ago
this blog post is a kind of guide to starting your own company and
making millions of dollars. this is a little unrelated but i just
find it funny to read this guide because its very convoluted. there
is actually a much simpler guide that their guide is a derivation
of. here is the actual guide:step one: be more intelligent than
most peoplebehind almost every business, behind almost every
professional success and behind almost any success in general that
ive seen, is a highly intelligent person. i find it irritating to
read because the concept of a guide is spelling things out so that
anyone can follow the steps and get the same result. successful
people always benefit from high intelligence, money and success
will always be unfairly skewed to the benefit of those who happened
to be born with better brains and into better developmental
circumstances. nobody needs this guide because they are either
smart and dont need a guide or dumb and in which case cant use this
guide.
 
  goatherders - 45 minutes ago
  I know lots of very successful business owners that aren't much
  more than normal/average when it comes to intelligence.  They
  just work hard and provide a quality good or service to a market
  they understand.  The END
 
  bacongobbler - 4 hours ago
  Sure, if you look at it from the closed mindset that nobody
  improves or can "git gud".It's been proven time and time again
  that humans can learn and adapt to achieve their own aspirations.
  Take one quick look at the special olympics; you'll see a very
  large group of individuals who have all overcome amazing
  obstacles to become olympians.Similarly, highly intelligent
  people may not have the domain knowledge required to understand
  how to bootstrap a company. Their knowledge domain may come from
  a completely different environment or culture which has its own
  mindset on how to bootstrap a company. Being smart does not
  necessarily make you more equipped than "dumb" (and highly
  motivated) people, but it does give you a decent head start.
 
    [deleted]
 
  3pt14159 - 1 hours ago
  I've analyzed a lot of startups data over time and at least over
  the past ten years I've found that determination correlates
  higher to success than intelligence. Most startups are not rocket
  science.
 
jcadam - 2 hours ago
I?ve been building a SaaS product for the last year or so while
working a day job and raising a family, and am only now close to
the point of having something I consider beta-able
(https://www.contabulo.com).I think I made the mistake of getting
too fancy with the architecture (but designing architecture was too
much fun to resist),  so I?ve ended up with something that?s a
collection of Clojure services on the backend,  running on several
linodes along with rabbitmq, elasticsearch, etc.  Well, at least it
should scale decently, if the need arises :fingers crossed:So this
project has probably taken way too long to get to a MVP.  But hey,
the day job won?t let me do cool stuff like use FP languages,
design architecture, do front end work, etc., so I need some sort
of creative outlet :)Now if I can only find some folks willing to
test this thing.  So far I?ve only gotten a small handful of email
sign ups via my landing page.  Maybe it?s time to spend some money
on AdWords, etc.
 
  patricklouys - 2 hours ago
  Start with things that don't scale. Approach people directly.
 
  mikeokner - 2 hours ago
  > Contabulo is Coming Soon> We?re currently working hard on
  getting Contabulo ready and hope to launch a beta in the very
  near future.That's probably killing you.  My advice would be to
  get rid of that immediately.It sounds like in general you need to
  reprioritize and refocus.  You use the words "SaaS product,"
  "project," "creative outlet," and "this thing" to describe your
  efforts thus far.  "Things" don't make money, businesses do.  You
  need to stop being an engineer building a product and start
  building a business if you actually intend to generate income
  from this endeavor.  To that end, I suggest a few immediate
  actions:- Give users the ability to sign up and pay you money.
  If users can't pay you, you'll never make a dime.  Stop worrying
  about architecture or feature development or closed betas and
  focus 100% on attracting and retaining high-quality customers.
  Don't do any further development beyond bug fixes until you have
  paying customers and can articulate why additional features will
  drive growth.- Consider offering a free trial to get "testers"
  instead of a beta (but don't call them that).  The free trial
  will allow you to collect feedback from real customers without
  establishing an ongoing expectation of free or reduced cost that
  can kill long-term revenue.  In general, startups price too low.
  Read a few articles like
  https://www.joelonsoftware.com/2004/12/15/camels-and-rubber-...
  and https://www.sequoiacap.com/article/pricing-your-product/-
  Spend a lot more time & effort on your branding/marketing.  In
  particular, your site currently shows two screenshots that look
  quite similar to Trello + photo attachments, and has a bland
  tagline of "Organize.  Collaborate.  Get stuff done."
  Differentiate yourself from potential competitors and clearly
  communicate value.  Also, minor nit but there's no reason a
  static landing page should show a loading bar before revealing
  the content.  That alone is going to cost you real $$$ in page
  bounces.
 
    dboreham - 1 hours ago
    >Give users the ability to sign up and pay you money.Agree with
    this. Years ago I ended up in a situation where I had 10's of
    thousands of people using our "beta, not for serious use"
    service for free. I didn't want to charge money because I
    figured that only made sense if the product was finished and up
    to the standard I'd want (it wasn't). People would email every
    day asking if they could pay something.Not so smart...
 
    andrewstuart - 19 minutes ago
    >> Stop worrying about architecture or feature development or
    closed betas and focus 100% on attracting and retaining high-
    quality customers.Hang on... don't you need a product that
    people want to use and pay for?  You can't just magic that up
    out of nothing. There's a necessary amount of development
    required isn't there to get something built that people are
    willing to shell out for.
 
    jcadam - 1 hours ago
    Thanks, a few folks have told me to just launch the thing
    already.  I?ve been stuck in a ?just one more feature? loop for
    too long.  Probably ought to just give the stripe integration a
    good round of testing and call it v1.And yes, I definitely need
    to work on the marketing site... I?m afraid I?m not the world?s
    best salesman.
 
uladzislau - 1 hours ago
The first tip - red ocean/blue ocean strategy contradicts what
these guys have been doing themselves - 1. take a proven "premium
WordPress hosting/WPengine" model 2. use hip violet cartoonish
website design as hundreds of other startups. 3. run affiliate
program with huge payouts $500/referral (potentially). Now I'd take
every advice mentioned with a grain of salt.
 
buf - 4 hours ago
I've been bootstrapping https://www.castingcall.club for about 2
years now. Although I don't have a team (just me) and I've not in
the 7-figure range (still in 6), a lot of the lessons from Kinsta
holds true.I wanted to point out one bullet though: AutomationMy
product is a SaaS product. I've automated every single thing
possible from self-creating wikis to recommendations. I stepped
away to visit Japan for 3 weeks earlier this year and came back to
a site that increased in value.I've thought about raising money for
it so many times but I always come back to this. Answer to someone
else, or keep growing it on my own terms.
 
  abhiyerra - 2 hours ago
  Using the 80/20 Rule with Automation has been pretty good for
  what I do (https://opszero.com). Most of the time we can automate
  with Zapier and not have to write any code until much, much
  later. One of the lessons we learned bootstrapping is that
  running and writing code has major maintenance costs and reducing
  the code footprint when testing out an idea is pretty important.
 
  joshdance - 4 hours ago
  What is your process for self creating wikis?
 
    buf - 4 hours ago
    User generated. They type a bunch of chaotic data in text
    fields and I do my best to structure them.
 
  [deleted]
 
  graystevens - 4 hours ago
  Agreed with the automation ? I?m a fellow bootstrapper[0] in the
  SaaS space, and wouldn?t be without it. If there is anything that
  can be automated, even if slightly prematurely before the need to
  scale arises, I do so.In terms of infrastructure, this meant
  using Ansible for quickly deploying new servers where needed and
  adding them to the right load balancer. Currently all I need to
  do is spin up a new instance with the right tag & run the
  relevant Ansible script - this will grab a copy of the site from
  git, sort out dependencies and any other apps needed (supervisord
  and so on), and add it to the nginx loadbalancer config as a new
  upstream server.Same applies for things like billing. Yes I could
  have started off doing billing manually, sending out invoices
  etc, but these take time and realistically need to be automated
  to avoid any errors.These things definitely meant I didn?t get my
  MVP out in weeks, but meant I could still do this as a solo-
  bootstrapper and look after a young family and such.[0]
  https://breachinsider.com
 
    buf - 4 hours ago
    Also have a young family. Having a semi-passive source of
    income is a massive sigh of relief on family life.  Been
    married for 10 years and my wife has never been happier.+1 on
    slight premature automation. In my case, there are 70k signed
    up users, so doing anything manually at this point is out of
    control.
 
    mikeokner - 2 hours ago
    > In terms of infrastructure, this meant using Ansible for
    quickly deploying new servers where needed and adding them to
    the right load balancer. Currently all I need to do is spin up
    a new instance with the right tag & run the relevant Ansible
    scriptTo me, this still sounds awfully manual.  You still need
    to always have an eye on load/health and proactively provision
    instances or risk not having the necessary capacity.  Why go
    that route and not a template with auto-scaling and an init
    script or image to pull the dependencies?
 
      ransom1538 - 2 hours ago
      Or, just not use servers. Aws lambda, etc - and never care
      ever.
 
      graystevens - 2 hours ago
      Valid point, and something I considered initially. However
      we've a security startup ? the likelihood hood of us getting
      a huge wave of visitors, the hug of death, is highly
      unlikely. Our landing page is static & anything remotely
      intensive requires an account. We are more likely to be hit
      by a DDoS, which I would hate to consume by upscaling servers
      and burning any potential profits we have.Additionally, I
      have multiple alerts setup for any signs of downtime, so that
      any deployment can be invoked as soon as possible.However, I
      completely understand your perspective, and if this was a
      different type of startup or industry, I would probably
      implement it the way you mentioned.
 
juanmirocks - 2 hours ago
Sorry: Wrong Thread.Does this study also consider that children
remain living at their parents' for longer and longer? For example,
it is not bizarrely uncommon in Spain to find people in their late
twenties or thirties still living with their parents.
 
  kelukelugames - 2 hours ago
  Wrong thread!
 
  tga - 2 hours ago
  Just curious, how do you manage to post a comment in the wrong
  thread? Are you using some kind of client?
 
    vhost- - 2 hours ago
    though, I can't remember what thread it was in, I saw this
    happen yesterday too.
 
  baxtr - 2 hours ago
  I upvoted this because it?s nicely bizarre
 
Hnrobert42 - 5 hours ago
That's reasonably interesting article with decent tips. But the
life he advocates sounds god-awful. God-awful.
 
  deadmetheny - 4 hours ago
  It turns out that starting a real business is hard and takes a
  lot of time. Go figure.
 
  dang - 5 hours ago
  Please don't post unsubstantive comments to HN? All this really
  says is some combo of "like" and "don't like". Others can't learn
  from that.A more substantive comment might say what specifically
  is interesting, or point out something specific about "the life
  he advocates".
 
    Danihan - 5 hours ago
    Pretty sure he means section number 8, dealing with long and
    unpredictable hours.Did you read the article?
 
      dang - 4 hours ago
      That's separate from whether the comment was substantive.
 
  mlevental - 4 hours ago
  better to rule in hell than serve in heaven.
 
foobaw - 4 hours ago
I admire them - they use 20+ SaaS products, and most of them are
extremely useful for automation leading to saving tons of time and
effort. Unfortunately, they're quite expensive for people just
starting out with zero funding.
 
mikeokner - 4 hours ago
The #1 best piece of advice in the article is:> The best way to get
things done is to simply sit down and start working on them.So many
people worry so much about failure that they don't even bother to
start.  You can't possibly plan for every roadblock and
eventuality.  The only thing you can control is your execution, and
there are no short cuts.  Hard work won't guarantee success, but
lack of it will guarantee failure.
 
  [deleted]
 
mlevental - 4 hours ago
here's my problem if anyone is willing to lend a helping hand: i'm
building an enterprise saas product that involves some cool
buzzwords and potentially really adds value in the space i'm
targeting but i'm getting no traction.i have an mvp (phone app and
webapp) to demo to customers. i have the decks and sales pitch. i'm
a reasonably smart and articulate person and communicate well (able
to "speak sales"). yet because i have no company history, no
clients, no credibility - in a word no social proof - for the life
of me i can't get any traction. at least i think this is the reason
i'm not getting any bites? i had leads (through my FFF investors) -
i've had probably 10-15 sales conversations in the last 4 months
that have gone absolutely no where (the latest one fizzled out
yesterday). pricing isn't the issue because i've floated several
different pricing schemes to customers and while some are more
attractive than others it's never been the deal breaker. maybe i
have poor product/market fit but i've experimented with adjusted
the product offering too and no significant change in reception
there either.now supposedly i should be learning something about my
market segment but the problem is i constantly get contradictory
signals - one customers says it's a great product but too early,
another says it's not a useful product maybe i'd like to consider
building such and such product, one customer says price is too
high, another doesn't even mention it.i'm really at a complete loss
for how to turn this thing around and i'm burning through cash
(although i'm not above taking cost cutting measures - fired one of
us three 3 weeks ago and cut my own pay this month).
 
  hyuuu - 4 hours ago
  im on the same boat as you, the problem is pretty much validated
  and I got 2 credit card before writing a single line of
  production code. Unfortunately, I am not able to grow from ONE
  paying customer (from the 2 credit cards), I am afraid that I
  have either built the wrong product or targeting the wrong
  demographic (CPAs/bookkeepers).
 
  the_bear - 4 hours ago
  Do you have to target enterprise customers rather than small
  businesses? Enterprises have very complicated decision-making
  processes that can be hard to navigate if you're not experienced,
  and even harder if you don't already have traction.Small
  businesses on the other hand will normally try out a demo of the
  product and decide on the spot if they like it or not. They
  aren't all that way, but if you talk to 50 10-person businesses,
  at least a couple of them will probably be willing to buy on the
  spot if your product solves a problem for them at a reasonable
  price.Go get some of those tiny customers even if they're not
  profitable for you, and then later move upmarket to the
  enterprise clients you really want. Or do what I do and just stay
  focused on small customers indefinitely because they're so much
  better to work with.
 
    mlevental - 4 hours ago
    it's true that one of the difficulties has been finding who
    exactly in the larger organizations to pitch the product to.
    early on we figured out that it should be people with a budget
    (i.e. those directly in charge of p&l) rather than executives
    or product teams but we've actually been "gatekept" from
    getting access to those people.but this is a good idea. i've
    tried cold outreach but to larger organizations. i'll try
    reaching out to smaller (tiny) customers. thank you
 
      ju-st - 3 hours ago
      I had success with pitching to consultancies. They have the
      right contacts and are probably interested in re-selling your
      cool and innovative product. Contact details of the right
      managers are usually published on their website because they
      want new customers to call them (but no one is stopping you
      to contact them for pitching :)).
 
      dboreham - 48 minutes ago
      In general I've realized over the years that you are much
      better off if you can somehow get the customer to come to
      you, asking for your product or service (vs trying to "sell"
      to them). Of course easier said than done, but this is the
      essence of marketing -- perhaps make some noise in the right
      places so interested customers become aware of you.
 
  [deleted]
 
  shafyy - 4 hours ago
  It's hard to give advice without knowing more details, but this
  sounds like there is really no need for what you're offering.How
  did you come up with the idea? How do you know it's something
  people want in the first place?To me, this sounds more like a
  fundamental product problem as opposed to a sales/marketing
  problem. Try talking to (potential) users and find out what
  version of the general idea you want to build they could use and
  why.Even if they say something like "too early", ask "why". Ask
  it 5 times, like a small child. "Too early" is just an excuse
  because they don't have the balls to say no. Find out what the
  underlying reason is.
 
    mlevental - 4 hours ago
    > It's hard to give advice without knowing more details, but
    this sounds like there is really no need for what you're
    offering.this has occurred to me of course but i just don't
    think it's true. without giving too much away it's a simple app
    that makes distribution of content at tradeshows much easier,
    personalized, and trackable (lead gen/capture for the content
    producer). if that's not a thing that tradeshows dearly need
    then i don't know what is.> How did you come up with the idea?
    How do you know it's something people want in the first
    place?everyone on the "advisory board" has decades of
    experience in the industry. it was one particular advisor's
    idea and i've run with it.> Try talking to (potential) users
    and find out what version of the general idea you want to build
    they could use and why.truf
 
      shafyy - 1 hours ago
      Just because someone with experience in the industry thinks
      it's a good idea doesn't make it a good idea :-)Let's do an
      exercise: I don't know anything about tradeshow. Can you
      explain to me what you mean by content and how it's
      distributed currently?
 
      hencq - 2 hours ago
      > without giving too much awayI don't really understand this
      attitude. Why are you keeping this a secret? Aren't you
      trying to sell your app/service? That seems hard if you're
      not willing to tell people what it is/does.
 
        HumanDrivenDev - 1 hours ago
        Perhaps they don't want to announce to the world that their
        SAAS is in trouble.
 
    billysbeanes - 4 hours ago
    I ran into this problem with my previous startup.  We had cool
    tech, but it didn't solve something that was a major active
    problem for them.OP - you may want to examine if you're
    offering a solution in search of a problem.  Problems are
    harder to find and drill into than solutions.  (And enterprise
    sales are hard, so make sure you're aware of the software
    valley of death and are in the mid 5 figure annual contract if
    you've got a long sales cycle).
 
      mlevental - 4 hours ago
      > are in the mid 5 figure annual contract if you've got a
      long sales cycleour initial price was there but we've scaled
      it down exactly because of the long sales cycle (which
      honestly i could tolerate if i knew that i was actually in a
      cycle rather than circling the drain).
 
  reubenswartz - 1 hours ago
  Sorry to plug my (guest's) stuff, but this sounds like the kind
  of thing Lean Startup is designed to help you handle more
  efficiently and effectively.Ash Maurya came on my Sales for Nerds
  podcast and talked about it.[0]I remember saying something like
  "I wish I'd known this 5 years ago."And he said, "me, too."
  ;-)[0]: https://www.salesfornerds.io/episode-7-ash-maurya-on-
  scaling...
 
  mikeokner - 4 hours ago
  Are you running free trials?  Giving potential customers an
  adequate period of time to evaluate your product can be a good
  way to get them past some of those early hang-ups, especially if
  you're there to hold their hand.Edit: I see in your other comment
  that it's related to lead gen at trade shows, so see if you can
  convince customers to use a free trial at a trade show so they
  can actually see the value (and have invested in the platform
  with real leads by the time you come knocking with a bill).
 
  cosmie - 4 hours ago
  It's a networking and numbers game.Did you guys pick this product
  out of the blue, or do you have industry experience? If you have
  industry experience, reach out to your network. Both for trying
  to get actual leads and for simply soliciting their feedback,
  even if they won't be a customer themselves. The feedback in and
  of itself will be valuable, and after you've exposed it to them,
  they may know of someone to connect you with, and eventually
  you'll land on someone that's willing to bite.> i have no company
  history, no clients, no credibility - in a word no social proof -
  for the life of me i can't get any traction. The above piggybacks
  off your past experiences and working experience to try to force
  some initial social proof. If you can't do that, it does get
  harder and is more of a raw numbers game to try to have
  conversations with as many people as possible.> i've had probably
  10-15 sales conversations in the last 4 months that have gone
  absolutely no where  That's less than one a week. Your number
  should at least be an order of magnitude higher than that.
  Especially with Enterprise clients, the deal rate is going to be
  really low and you counter that by a high volume of outreach.
  Even if it's just cold contacting, rather than leads from
  investors, you should be reaching out to several people per day,
  and following up with a regular cadence (which can be automated).
  Rarely do you hear back on first contact, and multiple touch
  points, which works even if it sounds skeezy to non-sales people
  (including me, I work for a demand/lead generation firm and know
  sales pipeline figures from an analytics perspective, but hate
  doing sales myself). Or even just one new person a day. But
  definitely not one person a week.> an enterprise saas product
  that involves some cool buzzwords and potentially really adds
  value in the space i'm targeting but i'm getting no traction. Is
  the added value worth the headache of integrating your tool? Is
  your product replacing an industry-standard in the space or
  augmenting it? Introducing change is hard and every change
  introduced simultaneously introduces a level of operational risk
  (from the change management process itself to the added
  dependency of your product in their work chain). Most
  organizations resist change, and your product either has to be
  seamless enough to be perceived as low friction to introduce or
  have a large enough upside to be worth the hassle/headache of
  introducing it.> (able to "speak sales") In enterprise sales, you
  need to speak sales and dance politics. Depending on the level of
  decision maker you're targeting, they'll have different levers
  they can pull, different politics they have to play, and
  different constraints on what they can do. Your pitch needs to
  account for the concerns of the decision maker you're speaking
  to. A middle manager will have different concerns than a division
  director than a C-level individual. You also need to make sure
  the person you're speaking with can actually make a decision
  related to your. Are you BANT qualifying them[1]?> one customer
  says price is too high, another doesn't even mention it.
  Different customers will value your product's impact differently.
  You'll always get conflicting responses like this, and until you
  have a higher volume of responses you can't make much sense of
  this. But one thing to keep in mind is what I mentioned above -
  different level of decision makers will have different responses.
  A middle manager may have authority, but they're working off of a
  "what can I put on my procurement card" budget because they know
  your project will die if you have to actually get approved as a
  vendor and get billing set up with accounts payable. So your
  product can be perceived as too expensive, when it's really just
  too expensive for this individual to push through on their own.
  Don't take this response at face value, dig into the reasoning
  behind it. Creative payment terms can sometimes solve this. Other
  leads may know they have full authority to sign an annual
  contract and pay up front, and won't mention budget being an
  issue. Normalize your contradictory signals by the situation of
  the individual giving them, to get a better idea of what your
  target demographic is and what your true issues are.Also, in the
  case where the customer says the price is too high, if that's
  their only hangup, discount the price significantly (or stretch
  an annual term into an 18 month term at the same rate, so they
  get a cheaper per-month rate but you lock them in for longer but
  renew at 12 months and the discount disappears without explicitly
  changing your rate on the client). Make sure you include language
  related to permission for a case study and testimonial as part of
  the discount terms. Chalk it up as a marketing expense to gain
  that first bit of social proof, and leverage it for other
  pitches.[1] BANT - Budget, Authority, Need, and Timeline. A crude
  but effective sales qualification process which validates a lead
  is worth continuing with, and also helps you identify which
  points you need to work focus on. For example, if you qualify the
  person has a budget, need, and timeline, but no authority, you
  know the company is a potential client but need to figure out how
  to get a more authoritative person involved in the discussion. If
  it's timeline, then follow up later on. If it's Need, then
  convince them of their need (or give up). Etc
 
    mlevental - 3 hours ago
    good advice all around. thank you.> If you have industry
    experience, reach out to your network. Both for trying to get
    actual leads and for simply soliciting their feedback, even if
    they won't be a customer themselves. The feedback in and of
    itself will be valuable, and after you've exposed it to them,
    they may know of someone to connect you with, and eventually
    you'll land on someone that's willing to bite.i didn't have
    industry experience when i started but the rest of the team
    does (decades worth). we've been doing essentially this -
    leveraging their network to "solicit feedback", i.e. pitch the
    product.> Is the added value worth the headache of integrating
    your tool?this is probably the crux of the issue for me. there
    is too much operational cost in actually rolling out the
    product i think. a lot of it revolves around the customer
    essentially reselling this product. we've considered taking
    reseller sales in house (i.e. customer signs a contract with us
    and we resell our own product on their behalf) but that
    basically multiplies my problems ten fold.> Are you BANT
    qualifying themno and i should be for every call. thank you. i
    need to make a list of thing i'm trying to learn about each
    lead on each call.
 
  stanleydrew - 4 hours ago
  > maybe i have poor product/market fitThis is going to sound
  harsh I guess, but you don't just have poor product/market fit,
  you have none at all.I would recommend reading Steve Blank's Four
  Steps To The Epiphany (again if you have already).
 
  brightball - 4 hours ago
  My advice: take a sales class. I waited waaaaaay to long to do
  that and realized so many mistakes and missed opportunities in
  hindsight.
 
    danielaction - 4 hours ago
    Are there any good online sales classes?
 
      raleigh_user - 2 hours ago
      I wouldnt necessarily call it a class but John barrows is
      pretty good. He can be found on YouTube. Taught me a bunch
      watching over the course of a few days.
 
      brightball - 3 hours ago
      That I can't say. I took a class in person once a week.
 
  eqmvii - 4 hours ago
  I don?t think there?s a one-size-fits-all solution, especially at
  the level of detail you provided. Marketing and selling anything
  is hard, but also highly domain specific.
 
  abarringer - 4 hours ago
  It depends on your vertical. It can take years to get the first
  deal in the "Enterprise" space even with very strong industry
  connections. It took us a few years to ink the first deal and
  many enterprise deals we work on are multi-year courtship dances.
  Hopefully you have a very long runway for takeoff.
 
wolco - 3 hours ago
Hire cheap and hire people smarter than you.  Good luck with that.
 
treis - 2 hours ago
I wonder how profitable these I make $X,XXX,XXX in revenue and
here's how type posts are.  I counted 17 people in one of their
pictures and if you assume they cost $100,000 each, that's
$1,700,000 in salary cost alone.  Then there's 3 offices and all of
the other overhead/costs they have to pay.I've worked on some hobby
SAAS stuff and every time I look at the numbers to see what it
would take to equal my salary the numbers are staggering.
 
  telesilla - 1 hours ago
  >$100,000 eachI think that's the key point made here, that these
  high salaries are not demanded if you aren't hiring on the U.S.
  west coast.
 
    dboreham - 1 hours ago
    Parent may be saying that 100k is a reasonable per-clueful-
    person cost pretty much anywhere. I'm in the middle of the USA
    and I wouldn't expect to hire a competent engineer for less
    than $100k.
 
      beberlei - 22 minutes ago
      Anywhere in the us maybe, nowhere else in the world except
      maybe switzerland. The blog post specifically mentions being
      remote and not all in the US
 
jimnotgym - 3 hours ago
Please can we move on to a better term than 'bootstrapping'. It is
non specific, means little to non-HN peeps and is just hard on the
ears. How about self-funding?
 
  Cyberdog - 1 hours ago
  If posts involving domain-specific jargon were not permitted on
  HN, this would be a very barren place.
 
  HumanDrivenDev - 1 hours ago
  As a fellow pedant who has complained about tech lingo before
  ('legacy' always makes my skin crawl a bit), what's wrong with
  'bootstrapping'? The term has a fairly rich history in
  computing.https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bootstrapping#Computing
 
tw1010 - 4 hours ago
Is it possible to block all websites from asking about enabling
notifications? Every time I have allowed it have I regretted it,
and every time I see the little dialog box asking for my permission
do I feel slightly more desire to just close down the tab and read
something else.
 
  sergiosgc - 4 hours ago
  In firefox, change the dom.webnotifications.enabled config to
  false. Type about:config in the address bar, accept the warning,
  search for the key and toggle it.
 
  hawkice - 4 hours ago
  My recommendation: leave. Websites won't stop doing something
  intrusive and annoying until it costs them more than it gets
  them.
 
    enraged_camel - 3 hours ago
    Yeah but how are they going to realize people are leaving
    because of that one specific thing?
 
      hawkice - 1 hours ago
      There's a sense it which it isn't your responsibility to
      figure that out. If they never check, you avoid annoyance. If
      they do check (A/B test, eyeballing it, whatever), they'll
      see. If they're unwilling to turn it off no matter what then
      they're kind of terrible, and probably should lose lots of
      traffic.
 
      guntars - 2 hours ago
      They are doing A/B tests on something like that, right?
 
  frandroid - 4 hours ago
  They really should be asking on the second visit.  I've enabled
  them for some sites (actually, this reminds me I haven't seen
  notifications for one in a while) but popping up before I've had
  time to assess the content is rude.
 
  raamdev - 3 hours ago
  In Chrome, Preferences ? Advanced ? Content Settings ?
  Notifications ? [Enable Blocked].
 
tabeth - 4 hours ago
Random sidenote: I feel that a ton of sites have the exact same
visual style as kinsta. Is this a template or something? If so,
which one is it?
 
  helloimraghav - 2 hours ago
  Relevant: https://twitter.com/chopse/status/930935055274225664
 
  mrisoli - 4 hours ago
  More of a trend, I call it the Stripe-design language/style,
  since they are becoming famous for design a lot of people use
  that as inspiration, it probably converts well, observed common
  features:GradientsDiagonal limits between sessions, these escape
  a little bit from traditional HTML-boxed content and suggest
  scroll-down behavior.Top left Logo, top menubar for quick
  navigation.Text to the left, images to the right
 
  raleigh_user - 4 hours ago
  no clue but I also love the style. Seen it everywhere and can't
  seem to figure it out.
 
    blizkreeg - 4 hours ago
    where do people go to get those graphics/illustrations created?
    they all look in the same style.
 
      raleigh_user - 2 hours ago
      If anyone figures this out let me know. I want one