GOPHERSPACE.DE - P H O X Y
gophering on hngopher.com
HN Gopher Feed (2017-11-27) - page 1 of 10
 
___________________________________________________________________
Cavium Is an Arm Server Contender
63 points by Katydid
https://www.nextplatform.com/2017/11/27/cavium-truly-contender-o...
___________________________________________________________________
 
antongribok - 38 minutes ago
If anyone wants to play around with a 96-core Cavium ThunderX
system for 10 cents an hour, https://www.packet.net/ has some deals
on their spot pricing sometimes.With their out-of-band console, you
can watch it boot from the very beginning.Not affiliated, just
sometimes use them when I need to play around with a physical box,
and can't do so at work...
 
mtgx - 3 hours ago
This looks even more promising than Qualcomm's
chip?https://blog.cloudflare.com/arm-takes-wing/Either way,
competition is definitely heating-up in the server space. If I were
them I would price these chips super-aggressively (near-cost) for
first few generations to get rapid mass adoption and software
support. Worry about profits later, when they are established as
serious players in the server chip market.
 
Cyberdog - 3 hours ago
Yesterday: ARM in your phonesToday: ARM in your toys (RasPI,
Nintendo Switch)Tomorrow: ARM in your serversNext week: ARM in your
desktop/laptop?The iMac Pro will have an ARM co-processor:
https://www.macrumors.com/2017/11/19/imac-pro-a10-chip-hey-s... -
Arguably for "Hey Siri" and other mobile-inspired functionality,
but wouldn't it be interesting if it were also an ARM-on-the-
desktop beachhead?I, for one, welcome our new ARM overlords.
 
  hawski - 1 hours ago
  Next week + 1 day: your laptop is no longer supportedWhich ARM
  SoC has mainlined drivers in Linux kernel? I fear that the ARM
  trend will only help to make the the e-waste mountain higher.
 
    aseipp - 56 minutes ago
    ARM64, at least, is moving towards UEFI/ACPI for
    booting/peripheral support, so ideally a lot of things will
    "just work" once people are shipping mobos/silicon with it
    enabled (and they already are).That said it's unclear what the
    volume on those parts will be once higher-grade CPUs come out,
    which will impact pricing/availability. And newer parts are
    going to be necessary for competitive performance/power. If the
    only place you can get a 14nm Thunder X2 is some high-end
    SuperMicro workstation, it'll be somewhat limiting in the end,
    anyway. (You can buy a Thunder X1 prebuilt desktop on the order
    of $1500 USD right now, at least.)ARMv7 of course is a
    different bag of worms; Mali tends to ruin everything. But if
    you can avoid it, a lot of systems can get by with upstream
    U-Boot and upstream Linux... You can even get some cheap Asus
    chromebook laptops that can run libreboot and upstream
    everything (including WiFi if you buy a dongle.)
 
  melling - 2 hours ago
  ARM has been in Chromebooks for a while.  90% of the desktop has
  been Microsoft Windows for about 2 decades so it's really up to
  Microsoft to try again.Ideally, Android and iOS will evolve so
  phones and tablets replace the desktop for more people.
 
    nine_k - 2 hours ago
    ChromeOS is already capable of running Android apps.What makes
    a laptop a laptop is a decent keyboard and a reasonably large
    screen. There is a fundamental mismatch between the screen size
    comfortable for the eyes, keyboard size comfortable for typing,
    and device size comfortable for holding in hand. Because of
    this, I don't think phones and laptops will ever converge;
    tablets and laptops are already actively converging, though.
 
      melling - 1 hours ago
      So, you simply need to add an optional large screen,
      keyboard, and mouse to your phone.  It has already been done.
      Now it just needs to be done a little
      better?https://www.samsung.com/us/explore/dex/
 
        MarkyC4 - 19 minutes ago
        See also: Microsoft Continuum, Motorola Atrix (probably the
        first Android that turned into a laptop)
 
  monocasa - 2 hours ago
  To be fair, ARM has been in Mobile Nintendos since 2001.And
  laptops have had ARM coprocessors for quite a while.  Power
  management controllers, disk controllers, NICs, etc.
 
  nine_k - 2 hours ago
  Finally, a chance to have a desktop CPU without a black-box
  coprocessor like Intel ME? (A quick web search did not find
  anything definitive about its presence / absence in Cavium.)
 
    hawski - 1 hours ago
    Every ARM SoC is already a black-box containing black-boxes.
    That's one of the reasons why almost all SoCs are on some
    ancient version of Linux kernel. They will never be mainlined.
 
  pm90 - 2 hours ago
  I'm very happy about this development as well. Especially looking
  at Intel's fiasco with ME... I just don't trust proprietary chip
  makers anymore.And yes, I am willing to trade in performance, for
  more security. My MacBook should be every bit as power conserving
  as my iPhone, perhaps with a GPU for multi screen and playing
  videos.
 
    hawski - 1 hours ago
    Who will make the SoC if not the proprietary chip maker? ARM
    does not make this thing better.
 
      pm90 - 1 hours ago
      I guess my point is that the market would punish anyone for
      being foolish enough to do that in the form of competitors
      without egregious backdoors. Whereas with Intel... it is hard
      if not impossible to design/make competitors (AMD being
      possibly the sole exception)
 
  zitterbewegung - 49 minutes ago
  I had the idea about a beachhead too but I think it would be
  different. What if you had an A10 to do all of the iPhone
  features that you would want on your laptop or desktop. Then use
  the Intel for the performance . You would increase battery life
  and both platforms would have feature parity (something I would
  like a bunch ).
 
  wyldfire - 3 hours ago
  > Next week: ARM in your desktop/laptop?And it's not just
  coprocessors, next year we will see real ARM SoCs -
  https://www.theverge.com/2017/10/18/16495010/microsoft-
  windo...Next year^H^H^H^Hdecade: RISC-V in your ______
 
    grawlinson - 1 hours ago
    I'd love to see RISC-V become a huge presence, but ARM IP seems
    a lot more refined & hassle-free.A bit similar to Linux/FOSS
    not having any decent CAD alternative to proprietary ones.
 
  AceJohnny2 - 2 hours ago
  > The iMac Pro will have an ARM co-processor:
  https://www.macrumors.com/2017/11/19/imac-pro-a10-chip-hey-s....
  - Arguably for "Hey Siri" and other mobile-inspired
  functionality, but wouldn't it be interesting if it were also an
  ARM-on-the-desktop beachhead?The current MBP already has ARM:
  https://techcrunch.com/2016/10/28/apples-new-intel-driven-
  ma...But this is similar to ARM (or MIPS or whatever) cores that
  already exist in all sort of peripherals (what's in your Wifi
  chipset? Bluetooth? SMC?), so it's nothing new.I'm dismissive of
  any talk of switching conventional Intel-based desktop/laptops to
  ARM. It's not equivalent to Apple's switch from PPC to Intel,
  because in that case there was a clear performance advantage. ARM
  may have the performance-per-watt crown on the low-power end, but
  Intel maintains the pure-performance lead everywhere else.
  Conventional desktops still care about performance (and if you
  don't, likely you can switch to a Chromebook), and there aren't
  any advantages to switching a heavily Intel-ISA-dependent desktop
  ecosystem (macOS/Windows) to ARM.
 
    Cyberdog - 2 hours ago
    I care about performance in my phone too, so where can I buy an
    Intel phone?The truth is that my phone doesn't have to be the
    fastest; it just has to be fast enough in balance with other
    factors important to me (size, battery life, etc).And the same
    goes with my laptop. I currently have an MBP with an i7
    processor, and I'm a web developer - it's overkill. I also play
    games with it now and then, but it's clear that the iGPU is the
    bottleneck there and not the processor. Very rarely do I do
    heavy compiling or video encoding or other CPU-maxing tasks on
    this thing.So would I trade the i7 for an A-series plus a
    couple more hours of battery life and/or a lower (or at least
    not further increased, damn it Apple) price? Yes, I would take
    that trade, and probably never suffer for it.
 
      hawski - 1 hours ago
      Why you bought a laptop with an i7 then in the first place?
      There are already more energy efficient alternatives - i5,
      i3, core m.I have a theory that probably when Apple will
      release a laptop with their own SoC it will be more
      expensive...
 
        Cyberdog - 1 hours ago
        Because it checked the other boxes I was looking for with
        regards to screen size, memory, and so on.Perhaps an
        A-series laptop would be more expensive for consumers (damn
        it, Apple), but I don't think it would cost more for Apple
        to manufacture, since they can do so much more of it in
        house.
 
    bryanlarsen - 2 hours ago
    "Intel maintains the pure-performance lead everywhere else"The
    point of the article is that ThunderX is claimed to be faster
    than Xeon Gold for HPC applications.
 
      monocasa - 2 hours ago
      But no where near single threaded performance.
 
      philipkglass - 1 hours ago
      I see one HPC application where ThunderX 30% is faster
      (TeaLeaf). For the others shown, it's neck-and-neck with the
      Xeon. Reaching parity with Xeon is admittedly impressive even
      on this subset of applications, but it doesn't look
      consistently faster based on the information presented. I'm
      personally interested in how this system stacks up for
      quantum chemistry (GAMESS, NWChem, PySCF, Psi4...) and I hope
      that more benchmarks will become available soon.
 
    agumonkey - 1 hours ago
    ARM is a bit of a misnomer, there are many segments, Cortex M,
    Cortex A. Only the "A" series could be considered intel/amd
    class I guess.But yes, arm cores are everywhere.
 
    monocasa - 2 hours ago
    While I agree with you that we almost certainly won't see an
    ARM macintosh, I wouldn't be surprised to see an ARM laptop
    exclusively running iOS at some point.  We probably will see an
    ARM core with single threaded performance in Intel's realm once
    Intel is fully backed against the wall that is the end of
    Moore's law.  It'll probably always be slower than an intel
    core if it has to emulate x64, but the iOS ecosystem gives
    Apple control of it's on chips in a world after the
    commodification high performance chips.
 
      Cyberdog - 2 hours ago
      > an ARM laptop exclusively running iOSSo an iPad with a
      Bluetooth keyboard? Apple already sells those!
 
        monocasa - 2 hours ago
        It's a little more than a stretch to refer to a current
        iPad with Bluetooth keyboard as a laptop.  But sure, it
        shows how Apple is inching in that direction.
 
          Cyberdog - 1 hours ago
          Well, it's a stretch for me to consider iOS as a usable
          laptop OS, so I guess we're both stretching. :PBut to
          play the devil's advocate, how is it not sufficiently
          laptop-ish for you? Because the keyboard is detachable?
          Because it has a touchscreen?
 
          monocasa - 54 minutes ago
          I think it will morph into a usable laptop OS as Apple
          pushes it into that direction.> But to play the devil's
          advocate, how is it not sufficiently laptop-ish for you?
          Because the keyboard is detachable? Because it has a
          touchscreen?Lack of a mouse equivalent.  Having to move
          your hands off the keyboard to do anything other than
          type is a pain in the ass.
 
tonysdg - 1 hours ago
I've run experiments/developed on both Applied Micro's X-Gene 1 and
Cavium's ThunderX (the original). Both of these have been touted as
"ARM servers".The X-Gene was complete crap in terms of both
performance and power consumption. The ThunderX was only really
useful for highly-parallel applications that don't require a lot of
horsepower, and even then it's a power hog.I'm cautiously
optimistic with Qualcomm's Centriq and Cavium's ThunderX2, but
unless they can make a compelling argument in terms of power
consumption, I'm skeptical of them making any inroads into the
market. Sure, Intel Xeons and IBM Power8s may suck power, but
they're _damn_ fast, so you can execute your workloads quickly and
then just shut the machine down or enter idle power states.
 
deepnotderp - 2 hours ago
Larger ROB/OoO window than Xeon? Wow.
 
Symmetry - 12 minutes ago
I'd sort of been expecting that ARM would begin making HPC inroads
when SVE[1] was ready to go.  But I guess those two Neon units
provide enough horsepower?[1]https://community.arm.com/processors/b
/blog/posts/technology...