GOPHERSPACE.DE - P H O X Y
gophering on hngopher.com
HN Gopher Feed (2017-11-16) - page 1 of 10
 
___________________________________________________________________
The FCC just repealed a 42-year-old rule blocking broadcast media
mergers
148 points by uptown
https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/the-switch/wp/2017/11/16/the...
___________________________________________________________________
 
campuscodi - 12 minutes ago
Pai should be in jail. This is absurd. The guy is lying to
everyone's face from a government function. When has ever a
consolidation not lead to a monopoly and when has a monopoly not
been abused?
 
cletus - 10 minutes ago
So:> One long-standing rule repealed Thursday prevented one company
in a given media market from owning both a daily newspaper and a TV
station> Another rule blocked TV stations in the same market from
merging with each other if the combination would leave fewer than
eight independently owned stations> The agency also took aim at
rules restricting the number of TV and radio stations that any
media company could simultaneously own in a single market.Now, let
me first say that Trump and Ajit Pal have been, are and will be a
disaster for media and broadband regulation. That out of the way,
let me say this:These rules were crafted in an era when we had:-
Local newspapers- A limited number of more broadly distributed
papers (state, national)- 3 Broadcast TV networks (4 including PBS)
where local stations were affiliates.- The importance of radio for
entertainment and news- Limited market penetration of cable TV and
far less channels and content choice than we have todaySo compare
that to today:- We can have a virtually unlimited number of TV
channels through cable and the Internet- Radio has a vastly greater
array of options through satellite radio (eg Sirius) and the
Internet (eg podcasts)- Newspapers are a dying breed, replaced with
online news distribution.- The barrier to entry to creating,
promoting and getting an audience for, say, a local issue blog is
comparatively cheap now. Previously it either wasn't possible or
was orders of magnitude more difficult.So it would be foolish to
say the the media landscape hasn't changed drastically in 40
years.Now the devil is in the details here. So if there can be less
than 8 independent stations in a market, how many can there be? 6?
4? 3? 2? Because there's a difference.Honestly there's far more
scandalous and outright dangerous things to get outraged about with
this administration.
 
  lsiebert - 4 minutes ago
  Barrier for entry is lower, but it's also harder to get paid for
  local news. Local coverage of political activities pretty much
  sucks except in major cities.
 
aaronbrethorst - 1 hours ago
A major beneficiary of the deregulatory moves, analysts say, is
Sinclair, a conservative broadcasting company that is seeking to
buy up Tribune Media for $3.9 billion.Sinclair requires its TV
stations to air segments with a conservative bent: https://www.nyti
mes.com/2017/05/12/business/media/sinclair-b...Edit: Check out John
Oliver's segment on this topic.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GvtNyOzGogc
 
  [deleted]
 
[deleted]
 
rayiner - 40 minutes ago
Non-paywall article here: http://www.reuters.com/article/us-usa-
media-regulation/u-s-r....In my view, the media ownership rules
were indefensible. First, they were not driven by the sort of
legitimate economic concerns that usually drive anti-consolidation
efforts. They were not (at least, not primarily) justified, for
example, on the basis of media companies being able to exercise
market power to charge too much for advertising. Instead, they were
justified by the government's desire to influence the content of
media. A well meaning desire, perhaps, but still a fundamentally
illegitimate exercise of government power.Second, the broadcasting-
license tail was wagging the merger dog. The FCC's purpose is to
address the "tragedy of the commons" that might result if people
could use public broadcast frequencies freely without concern for
others. It's not an antitrust agency, and has no expertise in that
area. It has overextended its authority over broadcasting licenses
to exercise control over mergers in industries it has no
jurisdiction over (in this case, newspapers).
 
  [deleted]
 
not_that_noob - 1 hours ago
The ghosts of Pulitzer and Hearst thank you -
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Propaganda_of_the_Spanish?Amer...
 
[deleted]
 
Qw3r7 - 1 hours ago
Someone needs to go wake up Teddy Roosevelt. As rude as it would be
to wake him up, we need someone to recognise that the amount of
consolidation the country is reaching is incredibly dangerous. This
teetering near Deus Ex level amounts of consolidation. Yes, the
current aims at Google and Facebook are nice to see. But, the
deregulation of media companies is allowing anti-consumer
practices. Even the video game industry is starting to receive
backlash for its "non-gambling" practices and the lootbox.Pardon
for the rant, that kind of seems everywhere. But, allowing
something like this to form is dangerous, especially with how
strong lobbying is now. With facebook actively suppressing certain
ideologies, the soon to be larger media companies will now have no
issue writing off conflicting ideas as well.
 
  spaceseaman - 50 minutes ago
  I completely agree with you, however I find this bit a little
  mysterious:> With facebook actively suppressing certain
  ideologiesThe only ideologies I've heard of Facebook suppressing
  lately are Neo-Nazi and alt-right groups following the
  Charlottesville stuff. I don't take issue with these ideologies
  being suppressed.Am I missing something?EDIT: Apparently so
  because someone just went through my history and down-voted all
  my comments...
 
    rodgerd - 15 minutes ago
    Unfortunately HN has apparently become a haven for Nazi
    sympathisers.
 
      thisacctforreal - 9 minutes ago
      I think a lot of people are equating defense of Nazism with
      defense of free speech.I'm not sure if they're wrong or
      right.
 
    Qw3r7 - 46 minutes ago
    I do not agree with what you have to say, but I'll defend to
    the death your right to say it.Evelyn Beatrice HallSuppression
    of opinion implicitly violates the Bill of Rights.
 
      thephyber - 14 minutes ago
      > Suppression of opinion implicitly violates the Bill of
      RightsNO.The Bill of Rights are enumerated protections FROM
      THE GOVERNMENT.The concept of "Freedom of Speech" is
      different and more broad than the First Amendment to the US
      Constitution, but a private entity not protecting it is not a
      violation of the First Amendment or any other 9. Yes, the
      double-negative is important.
 
      fhood - 41 minutes ago
      Sorry, this is my personal nitpick but suppression of opinion
      by facebook does not violate the bill of rights.
 
      spaceseaman - 37 minutes ago
      I do not consider Nazi ideology an opinion. Their ideas are
      purely based on maintaining a power dynamic. There's no logic
      or legitimacy to their ideas, and thus they are not opinions.
      They change the ideology as needed to maintain power and
      promote their own strength.For a historical viewpoint, simply
      look at how often the German Nazi party would change what
      classifies as being a Jew or "undesirable". It was only ever
      about putting fear into people and maintaining control. They
      had no real opinions on why these people were undesirable -
      those could be made up after the fact.If Nazism was an
      opinion, I would be willing to defend it. But it's not, and
      it thrives when it's given the legitimacy as such.EDIT: To
      try and tie this back to the topic at hand, are blatant lies
      still "opinions"? What about death threats and hate speech?
      My point is simply that we already make distinctions about
      what kind of speech is free, so I feel that Facebook
      instituting policies that align with these existing rules
      makes sense - even though I feel that they are becoming too
      large to be the de-facto source for information on the
      Internet.
 
        thisacctforreal - 13 minutes ago
        Friendly reminder that downvotes should be reserved for
        comments you don't want to see on the site, not for
        comments you disagree with.
 
      chadgeidel - 35 minutes ago
      Even if I use a million sock-puppets to amplify my voice? I
      generally agree with the idea that one (physical) person's
      stated opinion shouldn't be squashed, but we are dealing with
      scale here.
 
      rhizome - 35 minutes ago
      Suppression of opinion implicitly violates the Bill of
      Rights.Facebook's content policies are not subject to the
      Bill of Rights, which constrain only the government.
 
    thephyber - 9 minutes ago
    > The only ideologies I've heard of Facebook suppressing
    latelyConservatives put up a fit when they accused Facebook
    employees of censoring or otherwise biasing the "Trending
    Topics" feature to prevent conservative stories from appearing
    there.Last I heard, about 2 FB employees were suspended or
    fired over the story, but that's just from memory so I could be
    completely wrong. As a result of the accusations, FB reportedly
    converted Trending Topics to be completely automated. It was
    probably easier to abuse for coordinated troll armies once it
    was automated.
 
  cokeandsympathy - 12 minutes ago
  The current aim at Facebook book is to harvest as much of the
  world's attention as possible to resell to advertisers. Users are
  not it's customers, the businesses that pay it to advertise are.
  It's primary goal is to suck you in and keep you using it by any
  means necessary, ethics be damned
 
  sliverstorm - 40 minutes ago
  It's wild how we can look back in history, identify a time just
  like this with all the same problems, and pick out the very man
  perfect for these circumstances. Hell, at this point we just need
  to locate his spiritual reincarnation and turn him or her loose,
  knowing they are perfect for the job.They said history is a
  circle, but this is just so blatant.
 
    jmcgough - 20 minutes ago
    It's even more concerning now, considering how much control and
    visibility into our lives companies have, thanks to mobile
    phones and digital tracking.
 
  nawtacawp - 38 minutes ago
  I don?t game. Trying to find more info on the ?non-gambling?? Not
  sure what that is.
 
    spaceseaman - 33 minutes ago
    Just look up the EA Star Wars Battlefront 2 stuff. It's a big
    old mess. You pay money for crates which randomly drop items
    that improve the game experience.Some people consider it
    gambling because you are preying on the same tendencies in
    people for your own gain. People also don't get any real value
    for their "gambling". Other people say this makes it not
    gambling, etc. That's a very simple oversimplification of the
    subject - there's a lot of articles out there about it right
    now.
 
      cokeandsympathy - 16 minutes ago
      It's turning a game into a skinner box designed to extract as
      much money as possible from those who buy the game. It
      operates on the same basic principles as slot machines.
 
        spaceseaman - 14 minutes ago
        Pretty much.The counter-argument goes that people "should
        know" and be responsible with their money, but I'm not a
        fan of that argument. It relies on people being perfectly
        rational actors that they just aren't.I'm personally in
        favor of instituting regulation for these things. Even if
        it is just purely from the "we have to protect the
        children" angle - children are arguably the main market for
        these strategies after all.
 
    fnovd - 33 minutes ago
    EA recently released a statement that their "Loot Box"
    mechanic, a system by which players can only purchase items by
    buying them in a randomly-generated bundle, does not constitute
    gambling. If you were looking for a specific item, you may have
    to purchase hundreds of these boxes. EA argues that since the
    box you purchase is guaranteed to have some kind of item, the
    rules and regulations that apply to gambling with legal tender
    do not apply.
 
  [deleted]
 
JumpCrisscross - 1 hours ago
The political mood on media regulation has shifted, at least from
where I sit, in the the past weeks. Twitter blew its hearing.
Facebook and Google failed to salve the wound by sending
deputies.The belief I'm sensing is that the only way to check these
companies is through competition from traditional media, including
ISPs. If Google and Facebook and Twitter are running roughshod with
our data, this thinking goes, maybe the solution is letting others
challenge their data monopoly.You and I see the problem with this.
It's harder to evade Comcast than Google or Facebook. But every
day, that becomes less true. In any case, this is the first step in
Silicon Valley's price for what is broadly seen as its arrogance.
 
  jonny_eh - 1 hours ago
  This is about local TV stations getting gobbled up by a single
  company, Sinclair. I don't see what Twitter/FB/Google have to do
  with this.
 
    JumpCrisscross - 32 minutes ago
    > I don't see what Twitter/FB/Google have to do with thisWhy
    are "religious rights" and low taxes in the same envelope?
    Because they're the same constituency. There is no underlying
    sense to it other than political sense.Media mergers of the
    kind Sinclair or TWC have pursued, or are pursuing, have
    traditionally been argued against by Google et al's lobbyists.
    There just isn't another organized constituency who cares about
    local radio. But the precedents from local radio spilling into
    ISPs? Now there's a worry.Those same lobbyists now represent
    politically wounded clients. When the cats are away, the mice
    come out to play.
 
      turndown - 18 minutes ago
      You mean Google, a company that was founded in the late 90s,
      is responsible for an FTC rule originating 42 years ago?Your
      entire premise is incredibly flawed; religious rights and low
      taxes may be part of the same constituency, but opposition to
      media mergers is not a strict left or right issue.
 
        JumpCrisscross - 10 minutes ago
        > You mean Google, a company that was founded in the late
        90s, is responsible for an FTC rule originating 42 years
        ago?So nobody who wasn't around when the Constitution was
        written can be instrumental in defending it today?>
        opposition to media mergers is not a strict left or right
        issuePardon me, I did not intend to imply it is. My point
        was in coalitions not always have logical sets of
        views.There is no organized coalition against local radio
        consolidation. For a while, nobody bothered defeating it.
        Now Sinclair has. Opposition is needed. Unfortunately,
        nobody cares about local radio. At least not enough to
        organize.The only ones defending the old rule--at least
        when it's come up in New York, California or Arizona, or
        the limited D.C. circles I'm privy to--are companies
        fearing its creep. The dominant constituency amongst those
        companies are the tech majors.
 
    threeseed - 57 minutes ago
    Exactly. This has absolutely nothing to do with internet
    companies.It's all about Sinclair, Tribune and lots of
    political donations and favours.
 
  [deleted]
 
  adventured - 57 minutes ago
  It was pretty staggering to see AT&T basically threaten the White
  House over the DOJ's attempts to stop their Time Warner merger
  (threatening to investigate whether Trump had any influence on
  the DOJ's attempt to stop it).
 
    MBCook - 50 minutes ago
    I kind of see their point. It?s totally unprecedented for the
    WH to tell a company what they should get rid of to be able to
    pass a merger.
 
      philipodonnell - 25 minutes ago
      It might be unprecedented for the White House to publicly
      discuss preferred merger conditions, but the agencies
      involved report to the president so its probably naive to
      think that kind of politics has not always been involved.This
      is a combination of a powerful company who thinks this is
      their moment with a lax regulatory regime and they have to
      take it no matter what, and also we have a president now who
      doesn't care about keeping up appearances or abiding
      precedent, so all the gross behind the scenes stuff is
      getting vomited up into public discourse because neither one
      of them care about hiding it.
 
        MBCook - 17 minutes ago
        There has certainly been politics in the sense of what is
        too big or what would be too monopolistic.But from what
        I?ve seen there have never been specific demands from the
        WH. Especially not _before_ the merger was submitted.If you
        can find a counter example I?d love to see it. I haven?t
        seen any listed in the coverage I?ve seen.
 
  threeseed - 54 minutes ago
  Sorry but no.In many places of the USA there is only a single ISP
  to choose from. Where as there are many search engines and many
  social networks available to choose from. No one has ever forced
  you to use Google or Facebook but for many people they are forced
  to use a particular ISP.
 
[deleted]
 
Lev1a - 21 minutes ago
"greater consolidation" == "easier establishment of monopolies"
(probably)
 
ABCLAW - 56 minutes ago
>In his remarks Thursday, Pai said it was ?utter nonsense? that his
agency's decisions on media ownership would lead to a company
dominating local media markets by buying up newspapers and radio
stations.>?It will open the door to pro-competitive combinations
that will strengthen local voices,? he said, and ?better serve
local communities.?How?I'm not quite sure how the combination of a
more consolidated industry and the removal of local studios results
in stronger local voices.
 
  ksk - 15 minutes ago
  It seems like one of the provisions was blocking local stations
  from jointly negotiating on advertising. I don't know if makes
  sense to limit broadcast media this way. Google is allowed to buy
  properties in different markets (search/youtube/mobile/news) to
  consolidate their position. I suppose now the non-internet media
  can compete with Google on advertising by consolidating.Anyway,
  this is just my take after a cursory glance. Happy to listen to
  other viewpoints.
 
  1_2__4 - 6 minutes ago
  Remember that you can pretty much bank on:. When a Republican
  politician accuses someone else of something, they're doing it
  themselves.. When a Republican politician makes a claim on
  controversial legislation, the opposite of that claim is the
  truth.You can claim this is partisan grumbling, or you can pay
  attention and realize this is far more true than anyone would
  want to believe.
 
  fancyfacebook - 41 minutes ago
  Is "pro competitive combination" the new nonsense phrase everyone
  is going to start repeating? The people who come up with these
  things sure do have a sense of humor.
 
  ProAm - 38 minutes ago
  > I'm not quite sure how the combination of a more consolidated
  industry and the removal of local studios results in stronger
  local voices.Hearing once voice will be more clear and therefore
  stronger.
 
  ChuckMcM - 32 minutes ago
  It isn't of course. And one only has go back and read the history
  of the National Broadcasting Company (NBC)[1] where it was sued
  by other voices trying to break into a market dominated by a
  single media company.Oddly enough it is exactly like Google in a
  way, the ability to sustain a network depends on the ability to
  sell advertising which depends on viewership for pricing. And
  being unable to get viewership denies an ability to exist through
  advertising. So having a monopoly on advertising makes you the
  defacto monopoly on the viewership because it denies capital to a
  competitor to develop additional viewership.[1]
  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/NBC
 
  Delmania - 28 minutes ago
  It won't; this move was done to benefit a media company known as
  Sinclair. This company has a decidedly pro-Trump stance, and they
  require the local stations they control to air pro-Trump
  commentary.Make no mistake this is a political move, and one that
  is right out of a fascist/authoritarian playbook.
 
  rayiner - 26 minutes ago
  Note the new rules only permit one entity to own two of the top
  four stations in a market, addressing the only real consolidation
  concern (that the natural scarcity of radio channels would allow
  natural radio monopolies to form).But as far as I can tell, there
  is nothing about newspapers that makes them a natural monopoly.
  Why should anyone regulate combinations in that area?
 
    wfo - 10 minutes ago
    >But as far as I can tell, there is nothing about newspapers
    that makes them a natural monopoly. Why should anyone regulate
    combinations in that area?Very, very few regulations are
    designed with the sole purpose of dealing with natural
    monopoly. Most are there to prevent some monstrous or dystopian
    consequence of unfettered capitalism that we as a society have
    decided is undesirable.Having a tiny group of wealthy oligarchs
    own all media, press, acceptable thought in an area is one of
    those horrifying dystopian consequences that we apply these
    regulations to prevent.Be careful any time you see an analysis
    of media consolidation that ignores the reality on the ground
    -- the media's unique ability to define and shape public
    opinion.  Such an analysis is either so purely academic as to
    be not relevant to any actual political or social discussion,
    hopelessly naive or, worse, willfully ignorant in service of a
    particular ideology.
 
  nicolashahn - 18 minutes ago
  war is peacefreedom is slaveryignorance is strength
 
  jacquesm - 54 minutes ago
  That's the same kind of thing companies will say when they remove
  a bunch of features and drop a product: it is to better serve
  you, the customer. Never mind that it is complete nonsense.
 
    amptorn - 51 minutes ago
    "No, see, us making more money always makes it possible for us
    to serve you better."And do you serve us better?"Oh no. God,
    no."
 
Top19 - 1 hours ago
I hate mergers and think they?re dumb, but maybe this is for the
best. Isn?t the problem with internet news is that it comes from
everywhere, enforcing a kind of chaos of truth and a race to the
bottom? Maybe we should have near monopolies in media, so that a
certain laziness pervades and people don?t care about ratings?
 
  AnimalMuppet - 50 minutes ago
  This worked, once upon a time, when the major media outfits were
  close to the center, and cared about doing their jobs of
  reporting rather than trying to push a viewpoint.  If we got
  those conditions again, sure, this could work.If we don't get
  those conditions, though...
 
    thephyber - 40 minutes ago
    That only existed for television news and only because the FCC
    required television stations to air after-work news without
    commercials (making it a cost center) as a condition of their
    FCC airwaves licenses. Reagan's administration dropped that
    rule, deregulating television stations, turning news
    departments in to potential profit centers, and further merging
    entertainment and journalism.As far as I can tell, the current
    administration and Congress are more interested in moving
    further away from regulations than closer to the pre-Reagan
    regulation regime.To be fair, I don't think it will work today
    even if that regulatory rule was re-implemented. At the time,
    the vast majority of the US only had a choice of 3 major
    television networks, which were more or less equally non-
    partisan. Currently, there are too many channels and people
    that tune into certain channels do so to avoid being challenged
    by ideas they don't already believe.
 
  [deleted]
 
  [deleted]
 
  Sir_Cmpwn - 1 hours ago
  I upvoted you not because I agree (or disagree) with you, but
  because I think you politely presented a well-reasoned opinion
  and shouldn't be in the grey.
 
    thephyber - 46 minutes ago
    I didn't downvote, but I don't see it as well reasoned. It's
    essentially the "two wrongs make a right" fallacy[1].  In this
    case, increased media consolidation has nothing to with how
    fake internet news is.In fact, I'm of the opinion that further
    media consolidation will move us further from low-bias
    information sources and towards more MSNBC / FoxNews extreme
    partisan news sources. It will likely continue the convergence
    of entertainment and journalism which only serves to dilute the
    little media literacy that we still have in the USA.[1]
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Two_wrongs_make_a_right
 
    [deleted]
 
    [deleted]
 
  [deleted]
 
  sinatra - 53 minutes ago
  > Isn?t the problem with internet news is that it comes from
  everywhere, enforcing a kind of chaos of truth and a race to the
  bottom?No, the problem with internet news is that it's getting
  easier and easier to promote a lie as truth. With a monopoly in
  media, promoting lies will become even easier (for that
  monopoly).