GOPHERSPACE.DE - P H O X Y
gophering on hngopher.com
HN Gopher Feed (2017-11-15) - page 1 of 10
 
___________________________________________________________________
New EU law prescribes website blocking in the name of "consumer
protection"
58 points by cameronhowe
https://juliareda.eu/2017/11/eu-website-blocking/
___________________________________________________________________
 
porfirium - 38 minutes ago
>To give a recent example, independence-related websites were
blocked in Catalunya just weeks ago.That required judicial
authorisation. Good way of beginning a post, with a lie.
 
  cma - 36 minutes ago
  They didn't say it was blocked using this proposal.  Just that it
  was expedited through website blocking infrastructure that was
  put in place for other purposes.
 
  [deleted]
 
  eugeniub - 35 minutes ago
  I don't see how the fact that it required judicial authorization
  contradicts what the author said. Many abuses happen with the
  full backing of courts.
 
    porfirium - 33 minutes ago
    We should abolish prisons then? It's a ridiculous argument.
    Abuses can happen with full backing of the courts, but I expect
    them to not happen.In all the years that this system has been
    in place in Spain I have never seen it used for anything other
    than blocking websites that were in breach of the law.
 
      sverige - 5 minutes ago
      Wait, what?  How do you get abolishing prisons out of
      that?Back to the subject, what if a law is bad, but the mere
      act of saying publicly that the law is bad is, in itself,
      breaking the law?  That's where this is all heading.It starts
      with prohibiting the utterance of specific words because they
      hurt someone's feelings, but hidden under "consumer safety"
      or "public order."  No one speaks against it because "of
      course we shouldn't hurt the feelings of others with mean
      words."
 
  snvzz - 1 minutes ago
  >That required judicial authorisation.I can't find a source on
  this. Do you have one?
 
sassenach - 30 minutes ago
I think this is the relevant paragraph in  the document (page 27 in
http://www.europarl.europa.eu/RegData/commissions/imco/inag/...)
linked from the article:"3. Competent authorities shall have at
least the following enforcement powers:(e) where no other effective
means are available to bring about the cessation or the prohibition
of the infringement including by requesting a third party or other
public authority to implement such measures, in order to prevent
the risk of serious harm to the collective interests of consumers:-
to  remove  content or  restrict  access  to  an  online  interface
or  to  order  the explicit  display  of  a warning  to  consumers
when  accessing  the  online interface;- to  order  a  hosting
service  provider  to remove,  disable  or  restrict  the  access
to an online interface; or- where  appropriate,  order  domain
registries  or  registrars  to  delete  a  fully qualified  domain
name  and  allow  the  competent  authority  concerned  to
register it;"Seems similar to already existing measures against
infringement of copyrights, except that thing about circumventing
the courts, as Reda writes. Could this possibly mean websites such
as Facebook could be blocked on the grounds of protecting
consumers? The document defines 'widespread infringement' as"(1)
any act or omission contrary to Union laws that protect consumers'
interests that harmed, harms, or is likely to harm the collective
interests of consumers"
 
  tankenmate - moments ago
  As if the ICANN compliance don't already have enough on their
  plate squaring the circle over the WHOIS / GDPR / RA / RAA
  imbroglio. in with the good out with the bad
 
  digi_owl - 17 minutes ago
  > Competent authoritiesDo such a beast even exist?
 
    pilsetnieks - 15 minutes ago
    It's "competent" in the legal sense, i.e. the ones having
    jurisdiction over the matter. It doesn't imply anything about
    actual competence.
 
dalbasal - 27 minutes ago
This feels like a fight we're going to lose eventually.Proposals
come up.. most fail. I admire those responsible for putting up
resistance. But.. some succeed. Others partially succeed. Limited
to stopping pedophilia, piracy, nazis... Those are bridgeheads.The
direction is monodirectional. Eighty six proposals can fail, but if
the eighty seventh succeeds that's just as good. There is no going
back. Win, good. Lose, try again. That kind of dynamic guarantees a
certain result.
 
  pilsetnieks - 1 minutes ago
  > The direction is monodirectionalThe obvious tautology aside, I
  wouldn't agree with this in case of the EU (the US, probably.) To
  me, the EU feels more like two steps forward, one step back -
  this being the step back but, for example, the GDPR being the two
  steps (or leaps) forward.In any case, this regulation seems more
  misguided rather than malicious. It's targeting real problems
  that have to be tackled but it does have the fault of granting
  overly broad powers to the respective institutions.
 
  samschooler - 18 minutes ago
  I agree. The best outcome we can have is to stay pretty much
  where we are, or close to it. Its a bit like trying to stop a
  boulder from rolling down a hill.
 
golemotron - 48 minutes ago
I read "prescribes" in the title as "proscribes." There's an
argument for that too.
 
amelius - 18 minutes ago
I'm against this ... unless they block Facebook :)
 
[deleted]
 
maxsavin - 40 minutes ago
This is horrible