GOPHERSPACE.DE - P H O X Y
gophering on hngopher.com
HN Gopher Feed (2017-11-13) - page 1 of 10
 
___________________________________________________________________
Missouri Attorney General launches investigation of Google
74 points by elsewhen
http://www.kansascity.com/news/politics-government/article184113...
cle184113056.html
___________________________________________________________________
 
[deleted]
 
wnevets - 8 minutes ago
There are so many actual monopolies that seemly get ignored. Maybe
google needs to buy I mean donate to more politicians.
 
  izacus - 4 minutes ago
  They should learn from Comcast, which manages to bribe government
  in banning their competiton :)
 
sctb - 39 minutes ago
We've updated the URL from https://www.axios.com/missouri-ag-
starts-antitrust-consumer-..., which points to this.
 
ifij775 - 3 hours ago
I'm guessing someone in Missouri didn't get their political payoff
this month.
 
sounds - 3 hours ago
In case you got a weird sense of deja vu, this is Missouri, not
Mississippi.Mississippi's AG, Jim Hood vs Google:
https://arstechnica.com/tech-policy/2017/01/mississippi-ag-j...
 
11thEarlOfMar - 2 hours ago
Missouri 2017 State Budget: $27 Billion [0]Google Net Profit Last 4
Qs: $63 BillionGoogle can literally fund the state of Missouri
indefinately. How does Missouri make this a fair fight?[0]
https://www.usnews.com/news/best-states/missouri/articles/20...
 
  sp332 - 1 hours ago
  A monopoly on force?
 
  tryingagainbro - 26 minutes ago
  How does Missouri make this a fair fight?The power of government.
  Missouri can definitely pay for quite a few attorneys (maybe do a
  tobacco litigation type deal) but the danger is that other states
  will join in. Having taken on Google can be quite a thing on your
  resume as you seek higher office...who will resist it?
 
thebiglebrewski - 3 hours ago
Yay! I am happy about this. I feel as if there are a ton of
monopolies and trusts today that stifle competition. Does anyone
else feel similar?
 
  maxxxxx - 1 hours ago
  I think we should make life difficult for companies from a
  certain size on. These large companies kill competition and
  innovation.
 
    thephyber - 22 minutes ago
    I would prefer we "make life difficult" for companies based on
    their behavior, not their size.At the risk of sounding like a
    libertarian, I'm of the mind that monopolies aren't inherently
    bad until they start buying politicians and bills that
    reinforce their hold on the market.Tesla is huge for electric-
    only car companies, but I don't hear the average person
    screaming that they should be shut down in states where they
    are trying to bypass dealership-protectionist state laws. In
    fact, there are anecdotes of people buying Teslas used from
    other states because they (aren't|weren't) available new in
    some states.
 
      chiaro - 11 minutes ago
      Monopolies are inherently bad because not being subject to
      competitive forces means they can charge what the market can
      bear, rather than the rate set by competition. This is bad
      for the consumer, bad for competition, and bad for the
      economy (fewer people are making transactions than at the
      market clearing price, slowing down economic growth). If that
      makes you sound like a libertarian it speaks poorly to their
      general economic literacy.On the flip side, Tesla is also
      treated a lot better than smaller competitors, because its
      size enables it to play states off against each other:https:/
      /en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gigafactory_1#State_competitio...
 
      maxxxxx - 2 minutes ago
      " I would prefer we "make life difficult" for companies based
      on their behavior, not their size."It's pretty hard to
      measure behavior but size is easier to measure. As as Tesla
      goes they are still a very small company compared to their
      competition so I don't think there is any need to think about
      their market power and suppression of competition.
 
      vorotato - 18 minutes ago
      The game would change, they would just do as much behavior as
      they can get away with until they got large enough to change
      the law.
 
  fourstar - 2 hours ago
  The fact they they actively prevent some Adsense publishers while
  making an exception for others (in the field of Marijuana, for
  example), is enough for me to be on board with this. They're big
  enough to play favorites.
 
  fishcolorbrick - 3 hours ago
  I don't. I use a mix of Google services and non-Google services,
  and I've never had a hard time finding a good competitor for a
  Google tool.
 
    DataWorker - 8 minutes ago
    It?s not about your google app use. The ad industry in the US
    is about 150 billion. Google is pulling about 90 billion in ad
    revenue.
 
    CottageCarry - 2 hours ago
    I'd love an actually decent competitor to Youtube.
 
      rumblestrut - 2 hours ago
      Vimeo?
 
        kevinnk - 49 minutes ago
        Facebook and vid.me as well. And twitch for streaming.
 
        Dirlewanger - 6 minutes ago
        Vimeo isn't, and doesn't want to be, a YouTube competitor.
 
  IBM - 1 hours ago
  It's an exciting time for antitrust. The movement is getting
  stronger on both sides of the aisle [1].[1]
  https://washingtonmonthly.com/magazine/novemberdecember-2017...
 
jgowdy - 3 hours ago
Translation: We need money and we are watching the EU take
incredible amounts of money in fines, and it occurred to someone
?Why can?t we do that?!?
 
  FussyZeus - 2 hours ago
  The EU doesn't fine to fund itself. Fines are not a good funding
  source.
 
    dontnotice - 2 hours ago
    They are a decent ancillary source. The EU has a fixed multi
    year budget, fines are one way they use to supplement it.
 
dan1y - 1 hours ago
And I was just lobbying Google Fiber employees about expanding
fiber (or wireless) to my hometown, St. Joseph, which is near
Kansas City.
 
sjg007 - 53 minutes ago
Google is a target because of their strong relationship with Obama/
Clinton/democrats.https://www.nytimes.com/2017/01/27/technology
/google-in-post...
 
  sctb - 36 minutes ago
  Whether or not that's true we need commenters to include
  substantive information when making such claims, otherwise we're
  just gonna have another tedious partisan
  flamewar.https://news.ycombinator.com/newsguidelines.html
 
CobrastanJorji - 3 hours ago
I haven't read Axios before, but I really appreciated that summary.
I got the gist of what the lawsuit concerned and what the ulterior
motive might be and there weren't 10 more unnecessary paragraphs
with no real information padding it out. It's almost exactly the
right amount of concise.
 
  CodeWriter23 - 49 minutes ago
  A politician elected on a populist platform doing things to stand
  up for his people is an "ulterior motive"? To me, an ulterior
  motive would be getting elected on a populist platform, then
  taking actions to benefit his own commercial interests.
 
dontnotice - 3 hours ago
This is bizarre. It's also bizarre how the reporting on it doesn't
mention how out of left field this is. Why Google? why Missouri?
How come a republican is doing this?As for: The United States has
lagged behind Europe in pursuing antitrust cases against tech
giantsThis narrative is silly. The EU goes after "tech giants"
partly because they are foreign, the US doesn't have that
incentive.
 
  Top19 - 3 hours ago
  Europe has a bad history with records misused to later pursue
  political enemies. The records the Germans used come to mind, but
  also things like the Staszi secret police in East
  Germany.Interestingly, a lot of stuff that just ?works? in
  America is dangerous when exported abroad. This is a strange
  sociological concept I only encountered recently, but one example
  is that the American conception of ?fame?, dating back to PT
  Barnum?s days, was an impetus for fascism in America. So
  something that?s ?culturally safe? in the US due to our history
  and institutions can be dangerous when exported abroad.For more
  information, check out the book ?The Frenzy of Renown?.The Frenzy
  of Renown: Fame and Its History
  https://www.amazon.com/dp/0679776303/
 
  bagacrap - 3 hours ago
  The article provides possible explanations. A politician running
  for office soon positions himself as fighting on behalf of the
  local little man and against big bad out of state corporation.
  It's pretty much the exact kind of populist protectionism that
  has lately proven to be politically effective.
 
    dontnotice - 3 hours ago
    The guy looks relatively young, if I had to guess I'd go with
    the cultural warrior angle, I bet this guy is fully aware of
    the Jim Damore saga.
 
  nkw - 1 hours ago
  1) Why Google?Because media attention and it plays well with the
  current Missouri AG's base. e.g. pseudo-libertarian, anti-big
  brother, technology, coast-elites, etc.There are no statutes in
  Missouri that regulate in any meaningful way the use of consumer
  data by technology companies. Also, actual law enforcement or
  regulatory investigations are rarely proceeded with press
  releases to the effect of "we are going to investigate you", so I
  would imagine this doesn't go further than said press release and
  Google spending some money at one of Missouri's larger law
  firms.2) Why Missouri? How come a republican is doing
  this?Current AG [1] is the likely republican nominee for the
  Senate seat currently held by Claire McCaskill. It will likely be
  an extraordinarily expensive and contested race with tons of
  money and resources flowing into the election from across the
  country. Despite winning statewide office in the Missouri Trump-
  landslide, current AG is relatively unknown. I imagine he will be
  using his office to make a name for himself in the coming months.
  (I'm not saying that is any different than his predecessors, both
  democrat and republican -- both have used the office as a
  political soapbox to propel them to their next office.)[1]
  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Josh_Hawley [2]
  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Claire_McCaskill
 
  rdtsc - 1 hours ago
  > The EU goes after "tech giants" partly because they are
  foreign, the US doesn't have that incentive.Really? It went after
  AT&T before and split it up and it wasn't foreign. How do you see
  the "foreign" part being significant here?Though it would be
  interesting to think about Google pulling out of Missouri saying
  "Ok, you want to sue us? Fine no Google presence there" as soon
  as it detects an accounts or user connecting from there it
  returns an error and that's that. Wonder if that is possible?
 
  jerkstate - 3 hours ago
  > The EU goes after "tech giants" partly because they are
  foreignwhat's the other part?
 
  Erik816 - 3 hours ago
  The EU also has vastly different anti trust laws. There's no
  point pursuing some of the cases prosecuted in the EU in the US,
  because you would lose.
 
  [deleted]
 
  mpweiher - 3 hours ago
  Nah, the EU also goes after local champions, see for example the
  Vitamin case:http://europa.eu/rapid/press-
  release_IP-01-1625_en.htmIt's just that the US has become
  extremely lax in its anti-trust stance.