GOPHERSPACE.DE - P H O X Y
gophering on hngopher.com
HN Gopher Feed (2017-11-10) - page 1 of 10
 
___________________________________________________________________
Non-Consensual Intimate Image Pilot
39 points by JumpCrisscross
https://newsroom.fb.com/news/h/non-consensual-intimate-image-pil...
___________________________________________________________________
 
LukaAl - 1 hours ago
As other has pointed out, this is extremely creepy. The easiest
solution would have been this one:- The user uses a JS solution to
hash the images on the client, without the image being uploaded-
She compiles a form with additional information (e.g: capture her
account, reasons for uploading, suspect person sharing the
picture)- The picture is saved in the DB as un-verified revenge
porn.- The first time someone uploads a picture that matches the
hash, the pic is quarantined and the specially trained individual
manually check them- A scoring system could be used to check the
reliability of the submission. If multiple photos marked revenge
porn get rejected, the control becomes ex-post. For even more
violations, the user get banned from using the tool and should
directly contact Facebook. Submitting the same hash that has been
rejected, will count as a "red mark"Now, I understand this system
is very complex, what Facebook has done is an MVP and as a product
manager, this is what I prefer. But considering the issue (revenge
porn, not something I necessarily want to test the impact on
retention :-) ). Also, yes, it requires resources, but Facebook has
a problem with trust lately, better to do the best...[edited for
formatting]
 
  the8472 - 25 minutes ago
  > - The user uses a JS solution to hash the images on the client,
  without the image being uploadedYou have to trust facebook in
  either case, each time you do it. Either to handle your nude pics
  properly or to serve you javascript that does what they claim it
  does, every single time.On the other hand an open source desktop
  application only needs to be audited once and then can be
  validated based on a hash.In browser crypto is not a solution if
  you want to minimize the needed trust.
 
    oh_sigh - 24 minutes ago
    Nobody wants to run a desktop application given to them from
    facebook
 
      the8472 - 17 minutes ago
      > only needs to be audited once and then can be validated
      based on a hash.I thought I covered that concern, but I
      neglected to mention that it should be open source so
      everyone can audit it.
 
  evgen - 1 hours ago
  Now figure out a way to do step #1 (user does a hash client-side)
  without making it trivial for someone else to create a filter
  that adds enough noise to invalidate step #4 (uploaded pics that
  match a hash are quarantined.)
 
    wjh_ - 1 hours ago
    PhotoDNA would be an option, I imagine. Or at least something
    similar!https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/PhotoDNA
 
      moyix - 18 minutes ago
      Honestly, I doubt that most of these sorts of algorithms
      would survive concerted attacks ? that's why they tend to be
      closely guarded.Alex Stamos (Facebook's CISO) implies this is
      why they can't do it client-
      side:https://twitter.com/alexstamos/status/928646228472078336
 
    LukaAl - 42 minutes ago
    Agree, that's a problem but there are options to solve it. Look
    at PhotoDNA by Microsoft [0]. But it is a second step. First,
    you need the reporting properly done.[0]
    https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/photodna
 
    jsjohnst - 42 minutes ago
    This is already a solved problem at FB (PhotoDNA does this for
    them for CP images).
 
    tree_of_item - 40 minutes ago
    How does giving Facebook the image solve that problem, in a way
    that can't be done client side?
 
alexggordon - 2 hours ago
> To establish which image is of concern, people will be asked to
send the image to themselves on Messenger.> Once we receive this
notification, a specially trained representative from our Community
Operations team reviews and hashes the image, which creates a
human-unreadable, numerical fingerprint of it.This clearly
implicates that Facebook has, almost without reserve, the ability
to read messages from user to user (even though it might limited to
messages to oneself), and exposes that ability to its
employees.While I stopped using Facebook a long time ago,
Zuckerberg's quote, "they 'trust me'; dumb fucks" seems relevant
here. If I were Facebook, I would do this in a different, much more
privacy conscious way.1. Obviously, Facebook is already hashing all
images on its platforms and storing the hashes. Given that, let the
user, using a frontend only platform, upload an image and generate
the hash. Make sure this image is a real photo (not a meme or
something heavily photoshopped) in addition to making sure:1a) The
image contains a human[0]. Fairly easily doable for most
situations.1b) If not, let the user know that "we can't
automatically detect a human in this photo, do you want to still
submit this photo for removal, this could get a strike against your
account if (not in some list of reasons for removal)". Maybe the
photo has a picture of a credit card or something.2. Submit the
hash to the backend. Given that hash is not used on the platform
past a significant amount of views, automatically ban the photo,
and allow other users to petition for reinstatement of the photo,
knowing that a non-valid petition for reinstatement (the user
doesn't have rights to the photo) COULD result in a strike also.3.
Have humans review the petitions, and in cases where the users
explicitly allow, the images.Doing this would limit another human
seeing the intimate photo in well over 90% of the cases I'd bet. In
addition to that, even if the photo is shared with another human,
it would let the end user decide if they'd like a Facebook employee
to view the image too. IE, basic user privacy. Come on Facebook.
Dumb fucks.[0] very doable, https://trackingjs.com/
 
  leggomylibro - 2 hours ago
  I really don't understand why anyone uses Facebook.You have a
  phone, which can communicate with your friends. It's only
  remotely useful for its near-monopoly on event planning, and imo
  that's a job for the trustbusters.
 
    praneshp - 1 hours ago
    > I really don't understand why anyone uses Facebook.You really
    cannot? Like, can you not imagine one person, who doesn't
    realize (or worse, and more likely IMO, does not care) about
    the privacy implications?It's not hard to understand at all, I
    think.
 
    spinco - 36 minutes ago
    Compared to a phone (SMS) and other messaging apps (whatsapp,
    email, signal), fb messenger has two big benefits for me:*
    Cross platform: I don't have to type on a tiny screen when I'm
    in front of a computer, and won't lose my account or my
    messages if I lose my phone or phone number.* Discoverability:
    most people who I meet are on it, so I can reach out to people
    I meet at events as well as friends of friends.I don't love
    messenger. I use Messenger Lite on my phone to avoid most of
    the snapchat/gif/events/birthdays features. But I'm not aware
    of any other cross-platform messaging app with that
    discoverability, let alone one free of privacy issues.
 
  nimblegorilla - 45 minutes ago
  > This clearly implicates that Facebook has, almost without
  reserve, the ability to read messages from user to user (even
  though it might limited to messages to oneself), and exposes that
  ability to its employees.Why do you seem surprised by this? I
  can't fathom anything about Facebook's design that implies my
  posted content is hidden from employees.
 
  danbruc - 1 hours ago
  This clearly implicates that Facebook has, almost without
  reserve, the ability to read messages from user to user (even
  though it might limited to messages to oneself), and exposes that
  ability to its employees.You can view and search your message
  history on Facebook, so there is not really any question that
  they have and can read all messages. I never explicitly checked
  it but at least I never noticed any gaps, i.e. missing messages
  because I sent them using the Messenger app.I believe to remember
  that Messenger is supposed to use Axolotl Ratchet for end-to-end
  encryption but that is hard to reconcile with the availability of
  your message history on facebook.com. So maybe it's - quote -
  end-to-end - unquote - between the phone and the server?I never
  really thought about that. Or is it just not available or
  disabled in my Windows Phone version of the app?
 
    xanderstrike - 16 minutes ago
    You can download a complete copy of the data Facebook has on
    you, including all messages you've sent since your account was
    created [1]. I did this some years ago to graph changes in
    sentiment with friends.1.
    https://www.facebook.com/help/131112897028467
 
    porfirium - 1 hours ago
    Using Messenger you can start a secret conversation with
    someone which is encrypted end-to-end. Those conversations only
    exist in the current device. But regular conversations are not
    encrypted in any way.
 
    alexggordon - 1 hours ago
    It's not that infeasible to have a web platform that encrypts
    users messages, just each client gets an encryption key. Look
    at Telegram, or even FB Messenger end to end encryption. I'm
    not saying they ever said they didn't have the ability to do
    it, I'm saying it's weird that they would use "message
    snooping" as a form of user photo submission.
 
      danbruc - 1 hours ago
      When I send messages using the Messenger app - which is
      supposed to use end-to-end encryption, isn't it? - I can see
      and search those messages on facebook.com. Something does not
      add up here. And if they have the keys on their servers, then
      it's rather pointless to use end-to-end encryption in the
      first place.
 
        rrix2 - 1 hours ago
        facebook only does end-to-end for "secret" conversations
        started in their mobile app.[1]
        https://www.facebook.com/help/messenger-
        app/1084673321594605...
 
          danbruc - 1 hours ago
          That explains it and it seems unavailable in the Windows
          Phone version. And because I never owned or used an
          iPhone or Android device I was unaware of this
          difference.
 
BadassFractal - 2 hours ago
Tricky. Sending them all of your potentially leaked embarrassing
photos so that they can store them and prevent them from leaking
out. If they get hacked now someone has a lifetime supply of
blackmail material. Not clear if the cure is better than the
ailment.
 
  moyix - 2 hours ago
  From the fine article:"We store the photo hash?not the photo?to
  prevent someone from uploading the photo in the future. If
  someone tries to upload the image to our platform, like all
  photos on Facebook, it is run through a database of these hashes
  and if it matches we do not allow it to be posted or shared."
 
    BadassFractal - 2 hours ago
    Ah, missed that, thanks. Yeah I guess you have to trust that
    part. I guess I'm willing to believe that. Hopefully it's not
    like with Snapchat where everything get stored behind the
    scenes forever even though it "disappears".Also, wonder if
    basing things on hash will make detecting slightly modified
    versions of that content almost impossible. E.g. IG / YT can
    detect if you upload content with a piece of music that's
    copyrighted regardless of how much you alter it, but this would
    be fairly primitive.
 
    tonyarkles - 2 hours ago
    Is there a way for me to audit that the image is never stored?
    (No) It seems like that's a huge honeypot; someone compromises
    the "upload your naughty photos here" endpoint and has an
    endless supply of "non-consensual intimate images".Edit:
    Thinking about it a bit, I'd be way more comfortable with the
    idea of the image hashes being computed on-device and only the
    hashes being sent to the server. This opens a different door of
    abuse (by essentially permitting individuals to ban someone
    from posting an image by uploading the hash of the image), but
    it's definitely preferable to encouraging people to send all
    their selfies to the privacy commissioner.
 
      evgen - 1 hours ago
      While this (client-side hashing) would be better in terms of
      privacy protection for this specific case it is not going to
      happen because Facebook is not allowed to perform the
      specific photo hashing client-side as this would expose the
      hashing mechanism to analysis.
 
        the8472 - 18 minutes ago
        maybe they shouldn't ask for nudes until they have designed
        an open source algorithm?
 
        dmitrygr - 35 minutes ago
          > this would expose the hashing mechanism to analysis
        Security through obscurity. Works every time (tm)
 
    BinaryIdiot - 2 hours ago
    But you are sending an image to yourself in Messenger which
    DOES normally keep an image. It doesn't say here that they
    explicitly delete the message you sent via Messenger, does it?
    Perhaps you have to delete that for yourself? And do they take
    back-ups of Messenger data in which this photo may now be
    in?Seems like a very awkward flow to forcefully repurpose
    Messenger to do something it shouldn't be doing.
 
    giobox - 1 hours ago
    All you can do is take FB at their word that the image is
    destroyed irrevocably.Given what we know about data retention
    policies at big tech firms, I'm not so sure I would feel
    confident taking the press release at face value. I'd really
    like to see a white paper or similar outlining the specifics of
    how this is being handled. I'd also have questions around what
    steps have been taken to prevent rogue Facebook employees
    trying to obtain the images.I really wish they had found a way
    to generate the hashes they require client side and not receive
    the image at all, especially as this is something that
    presumably would be really great for revenge porn victims.
 
pault - 2 hours ago
This is insane. If they can fingerprint your images, why can't they
provide a tool for processing the image and sending the fingerprint
only? Can you imagine how big of a target a tailor made database of
blackmail material linked to facebook accounts would be?
 
  DiThi - 2 hours ago
  If you can send only the fingerprint, what stops you from
  uploading photos you are not in?A better idea may be an uploading
  tool where you can obscure some parts for verification.
 
    sova - 2 hours ago
    Seems like anybody can upload any body.
 
    d0ugie - 1 hours ago
    That sounds like a solution to me, it satisfies whatever the
    need is for human involvement while enabling the user to redact
    the weaponizable elements of the picture.
 
  Dylan16807 - 2 hours ago
  They could just send fingerprints, sure.The problem is that you
  presumably want the image to be blocked immediately upon
  upload.But facebook is worried that people will abuse the system,
  and they don't want images to be instantly wrongfully blocked
  until someone can review it.Abuse-resistance.  Instant blocking.
  Perfect privacy.  Pick two.  There's no perfect solution.
 
    ImSkeptical - 1 hours ago
    Why not suspend reported images for review. If the review
    indicates the reporter is abusing the system, blacklist the
    reporter from the automatic function. Also block new and recent
    accounts, and stop automatic blocking for images on frequently
    targeted accounts and major accounts (e.g. If someone is
    reporting Donald Trump, manually check, don't automatically
    remove).
 
      Dylan16807 - 1 hours ago
      Doesn't this system already exist?  But reporting an image
      means it wasn't preemptively blocked, the benefit of the new
      system.
 
  evgen - 1 hours ago
  In addition to the reasons other have suggested, one reason that
  this is not done client side is that the PhotoDNA tech that is
  used for the fingerprinting is not something that Facebook can
  share or make available.  It's primary use is in matching posted
  images with known databases of child porn images, so providing a
  mechanism for someone to reverse engineer the system and develop
  a means of bypassing it is not going to happen.
 
oh_sigh - 24 minutes ago
> Once we receive this notification, a specially trained
representative from our Community Operations team reviews and
hashes the image, which creates a human-unreadable, numerical
fingerprint of it.I'm wondering how long it will be before we start
seeing cell phone pics of screens with peoples intimate images on
them.
 
intopieces - 58 minutes ago
It?s interesting that the general consensus is strangers seeing
your nudes is creepy (referring to the manual processing aspect.) I
understand it on a fundamentally emotional level: I want absolute
control of my private life / photos / etc. I am embarrassed at the
idea of being seen naked without my active participation. On a
logical level, though, what difference does it make if every person
you will never meet has seen your dick?It?s a philosophical
question, to be sure.Also, what happens with these manual reviews
that turn up underage nudes? Teen sexting is a thing. For that
matter, isn?t Snapchat a massive repository of child pornography?
 
  cowpig - 22 minutes ago
  What's really bizarre to me is that people here don't think using
  facebook in general is creepy...
 
beaconstudios - 2 hours ago
isn't nudity generally banned on facebook anyway? I didn't realise
this would/could be an issue. Unless they're talking about private
communications in eg. messenger.
 
  sp332 - 2 hours ago
  Revenge porn isn't all about nudity. And this does cover
  Messenger (and Instagram). The point isn't to get an image taken
  down after the fact, but to proactively block it from being
  posted or sent in the first place.
 
    beaconstudios - 2 hours ago
    I thought facebook would run posted images through their AI
    nudity filter before allowing them to be posted? It's good that
    this covers messenger as I've read stories in the past of
    people being blackmailed over it, but surely there must be a
    better way than asking people to upload their private images to
    facebook. Plus, what's the case with younger facebook members?
    Do they upload the images and are therefore sharing child
    pornography with facebook, or not upload and don't get to be
    protected from revenge porn postings, when they're one of the
    most at-risk demographics?
 
      sp332 - 2 hours ago
      I didn't know Facebook had an AI nudity filter, I thought it
      was all based on reported images. They softened their stance
      on some things, especially after censoring a Pulizter-prize
      winning photo from Vietnam, and eventually changed their
      policy on breastfeeding too
      https://www.facebook.com/help/340974655932193/I'm sure they
      don't have a legal exception for underage photos, but those
      laws do vary from state to state.
 
      karthikshan - 3 minutes ago
      It's probably infeasible to run that type of filter in-path
      during uploads without adding too much latency to posting,
      wheras the hashing approach is much less expensive. AI
      filters likely take down images after they've already been
      posted
 
dmitrygr - 56 minutes ago
So they basically openly admit that a human will review nudes? How
is this in any way a sane idea? If you were already scarred (for
life, likely) by said revenge porn existing and leaking out
somewhere non-facebook, likely the last thing you want is to be
forced, YOURSELF, to send it to someone (facebook)
 
  skybrian - 33 minutes ago
  From the article: "people can already report if their intimate
  images have been shared on our platform without their consent".If
  it already happened, they don't need to upload it again.
  Presumably this new process is for prevention when it didn't
  happen yet but they have good reason to suspect that it will.
 
    dmitrygr - 21 minutes ago
    "if it already happened on facebook" != "if it already
    happened"There is, in fact, a whole world outside of
    www.thefacebook.com
 
marrone12 - 2 hours ago
Why do they need a human representative to hash the image? I don't
understand why this can't all be done automatically. Creeps me out
that a real human would see intimate pictures before they block
them.
 
  leggomylibro - 2 hours ago
  Because otherwise the platform will not be able to store or
  display images at all.Report, report, report, report, report -
  you know someone will do it, or make a bot to.Or they would need
  to put actual effort into developing a novel solution to a new-
  ish problem. But they're a large incumbent, so...no.
 
  [deleted]
 
  gadjo95 - 2 hours ago
  Because otherwise people will just submit random picture for the
  lulz
 
  BinaryIdiot - 2 hours ago
  I'm _assuming_ the only reason a human representative is doing
  this is so the system doesn't get abused. Like say I upload a
  photo claiming it is of myself but it's actually the
  advertisement a competitor of mine is using. If they didn't
  verify it was something that SHOULD be removed they'd
  automatically remove my competitor's posting of their
  advertisement every time they posted it.Granted I really wish
  this was all done on the client so Facebook didn't gain access to
  the images themselves but I'm not sure of a good way around it to
  verify the image is something they should remove and not an abuse
  of the system.
 
    pjc50 - 2 hours ago
    I'd assume that would be dealt with by an appeals process on
    the other end; if you post an image and it's flagged, you
    should be able to say "this is obviously not porn" and get it
    posted and the original false claimer should lose trust points.
 
      BinaryIdiot - 2 hours ago
      Problem is it's significantly easier and faster to create
      noise than it is to clean up the noise. Dropping the up front
      review in favor of an appeals only system sounds impossible
      to handle at Facebook scale, IMO. Every time you shut
      someone's account down for losing too much trust, 10 others
      would have already replaced it.
 
    tantalor - 2 hours ago
    they'd automatically remove my competitor's posting of their
    advertisement every time they posted itSince that will be very
    rare case why not make that the human-required step?
 
      BinaryIdiot - 2 hours ago
      Why would that be a "very rare" case? Facebook and Twitter
      have (or have had) hundreds of thousands of bots and constant
      abuses, why would this feature be rarely abused?
 
lasfter - 1 hours ago
Facebook: "Send Nudes"
 
Apreche - 2 hours ago
Ok, so now all the harassers out there are just going to edit a few
pixels on the images before uploading, so the hash isn't caught.
All the same tricks use don YouTube to avoid the copyright bot,
will work here as well.
 
  baddox - 2 hours ago
  I?m not saying that people won?t be able to fool it, but I?m sure
  it would require way more than just changing a few pixels. I?ve
  seen YouTube videos that were clearly edited to circumvent the
  copyright bot, and the video transformations were so significant
  that the videos were essentially unwatchable.
 
  oh_sigh - 22 minutes ago
  md5/sha isn't the only hashing method. There are perceptual
  hashes which are fairly resilient to simply editing few pixels,
  or rotating/resizing/cropping an image.
 
  giobox - 1 hours ago
  I have no knowledge of the implementation, but I think it's more
  than likely a safe bet that someone at Facebook probably thought
  of this and chose a slightly more sophisticated approach. The
  entire system would be completely pointless otherwise!
 
  BinaryIdiot - 2 hours ago
  Yeah I'm curious how their hashing mechanism works. Like, is it a
  straight up sha hash of the image or something a little more
  sophisticated that wouldn't be fooled by minor edits? Though in
  the latter case can that even technically be considered hashing?
  I guess it all depends on how they're doing it which brings us
  back to my first question...
 
    evgen - 1 hours ago
    It is called PhotoDNA and was developed by Microsoft.  This is
    the same tech that is used to find child porn images even when
    people go to various lengths to prevent simple hashing from
    being able to determine photo similarity.  It works
    surprisingly well at the task from what I have seen/heard.
 
    FRex - 1 hours ago
    Hash by strictest definition is just a function that maps any
    input to fixed size output. There is a special subcategory of
    hashes that are locality sensitive and change a little when
    input changes a little, just like there is a special
    subcategory of crypto hashes. See:
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Locality-
    sensitive_hashingTechnology for searching for similar images (I
    have no idea how it works interally) already exists and is very
    widely deployed. You can easily find an image similar
    (uncropped, cropped, with different filter, greyed, ungreyed,
    with a logo in corner, etc.) to your input image on
    https://tineye.com/ and https://images.google.com .
 
  CGamesPlay - 1 hours ago
  This is likely the same image hashing they use to detect child
  pornography, and there's been a lot of work invested into making
  sure that those types of filters don't prevent the detection. You
  can very effectively require that the "real" image is visually
  entirely dissimilar.Now, obviously you can't prevent the actual
  data from being distributed. For example, you could base64 encode
  the image and send it as a series of messages instead.The
  motivation for revenge porn is to hurt the other person. One
  vector for this is to post it to all of your mutual friends so
  that the victim is shamed. This adds a barrier so that the mutual
  friends have to invest work into getting and distributing the
  porn, and won't accidentally see it flowing through their feed.
 
orastor - 2 hours ago
To everyone asking why they need a human to review to image before
hashing it: it's currently the only way to prevent abuse of this
system -- Without this, everyone would upload random images that
would get taken down, effectively mass-trolling
 
  Pulcinella - 1 hours ago
  At most, they would only need a human to review after the hash
  matches, not before.Facebooks plan is awful.
 
deusofnull - 1 hours ago
The discussion surrounding this made me think of a feature I'd love
to have along these lines.  I'd like to be able to blacklist people
/ certain people from uploading pictures that facebook detects my
face in.  Fb as a platform must already have this functionality,
what with the auto face identification and privacy / review post
settings.I can imagine images of people that aren't "non-consensual
intimate images" that they'd reasonably still like to be able to
block being posted.One use case I can imagine is doxxing
prevention. Say there is a national news story involving some
random person in some small town that exposes the persons face and
name and rough location.  Some group of enraged internet denizens
start sharing the person's face and name all over the place as a
means to spread their pitchfork & torches mob against them.Seems
like a reasonable feature to me.  Recently a professor in my state
made some remarks about white privilege and the doxxing of him was
so violent and pervasive that he and his family had to leave the
state for months, and he still gets threats and needs protection on
campus.
 
  rhizome - 1 hours ago
  Or they can block display of the photo until all faces approve.
 
macawfish - 2 hours ago
Something just doesn't add up here.
 
Xeoncross - 40 minutes ago
The better solution is to have the image hashed and NOT sent to
facebook. If the hash matches an existing image [A]. If the hash
isn't found [B].[A]: human can review the image they already
have[B]: Facebook waits until someone uploads an image that matches
and then reviews the image (as normal) but with a marker alerting
the problem.The benefit is that people NOT affected won't have to
upload lots of images of themselves to facebook personal for
"review" just to be sure.The problem is that should facebook update
it's hashing or find better ways to match images, having the
original image would allow them to transition. This point is moot
though since facebook claims  not to save the image anyway.
 
  pishpash - 24 minutes ago
  You'll have to guarantee the authenticity of the client side
  code, but yes.Here's what you do: on the client side embed image
  into a semantic space (using NN or whatever), quantize, _then_
  hash the representation. Afterwards you send the hash. If you had
  to change client side code, you can just ask the user to redo the
  process.
 
    Xeoncross - 20 minutes ago
    Yes, I was hoping they would not simply `sha1()` the image
    data. I wouldn't worry much about trying to fake hashes since
    we are already allowing them to provide whatever image as input
    they want (hence the review).
 
turc1656 - 36 minutes ago
This is dumb.  A hash?  That's only going to deter the most
incompetent internet users when it comes to a file type that is
subject to alteration without losing it's information value
(pictures, video, music, etc.).All someone has to do is change a
single bit/pixel in the image and the hash will be different.  No
one will notice that and it defeats the hash.  Hell, you don't even
have to do that.   You can just rotate the image, save it, then
rotate it back, and re-save it.  The odds are that program that you
used will most certainly not write the image data in the same exact
way.Hashes would be better for files that cannot be altered without
breaking the contents.  Although, these could be subject to
compression, which would create a new hash.Either way, I think they
need to use something similar to Google's image search that
actually examines the photo contents for similarity.
 
  sveiss - 30 minutes ago
  In this case, 'hash' doesn't necessarily mean 'a cryptographic
  hash of the raw file contents'.There are perceptual hash
  techniques which still match after changes to the file, and are
  tuned in a similar manner to lossy compression algorithms to
  prioritize comparing information relevant to human
  perceptions.https://www.phash.org/ is one open-source example.
 
  paulhodge - 30 minutes ago
  It's not a technical article. I think it's safe to assume that 1)
  The people implementing this aren't idiots, and 2) The "hash" is
  probably referring to a "perceptual hash", where very-similar
  images would show up as the same.
 
  ecopoesis - 28 minutes ago
  There are hashes that represent the content of photos, the
  Microsoft?s PhotoDNA and Cloudinary?s pHash. I?m pretty sure
  Facebook?s engineers are smart enough to that they can?t just run
  photos through MD5 and have everything work.
 
  oh_sigh - 23 minutes ago
  It could be a perceptual hash. Who knows? The article doesn't go
  into detail.