GOPHERSPACE.DE - P H O X Y
gophering on hngopher.com
HN Gopher Feed (2017-11-10) - page 1 of 10
 
___________________________________________________________________
IBM Q system in development with working 50 qubit processor
124 points by babak_ap
http://www-03.ibm.com/press/us/en/pressrelease/53374.wss
___________________________________________________________________
 
petrikapu - 1 hours ago
Do you think this can fk up RSA and render our industry obsolete?
 
zamalek - 4 hours ago
What are they doing about error correction? Not that it makes this
any less impressive (everything starts somewhere), are they simply
ignoring the problem?
 
  vtomole - 3 hours ago
  It's a bit too early for quantum computers to do fault-tolerant
  (error corrected) computation. This is because you need more than
  one physical qubit to make a logical (error corrected) qubit. You
  need 7 physical qubits to encode a logical qubit if you use the
  Steane code [0]. So with 50 qubits, they could theoretically make
  7 error corrected qubits.[0]:
  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Steane_code
 
    greeneggs - 3 hours ago
    In fact, the smallest quantum error-correcting code using
    qubits uses only five qubits. [1]  So you could fit 10 of these
    codewords into 50 qubits.But that's not right.  At least two
    more qubits are needed for fault-tolerant error correction.  So
    that means you could fit nine codewords into 50 qubits (since
    9x5+2=47 < 50).But that's not right.  There exist more
    efficient codes that put multiple encoded qubits into a single
    code block. [2]  For example, three qubits can be encoded into
    eight, still with distance three. [3]  Six of these could fit
    into 50 qubits (since 6x8+2=50), giving 18 encoded qubits.But
    that's not right.  The IBM systems are superconducting qubits,
    with very constrained interactions.  Not every qubit can talk
    directly to every other qubit.  So you'd probably want every
    code block to have its own extra qubits dedicated to error
    correction.  If you need 8+2 qubits per code block, then you
    could fit five code blocks, for 15 encoded qubits, into
    50.Obviously this is really complicated.[1] https://en.wikipedi
    a.org/wiki/Stabilizer_code#Example_of_a_s...[2]
    http://www.codetables.de/TableIII.php[3]
    http://www.codetables.de/QECC.php?q=4&n=8&k=3
 
      jackfoxy - 1 hours ago
      I recently had a conversation with a Microsoft quantum
      researcher, and this a close approximation to his answer. I
      just wanted a number. It's complicated.
 
  agumonkey - 3 hours ago
  I just saw a talk by I forgot which bell labs engineer was on the
  transistor team. He told it took two or more years to get the
  errors to a useful level. It's easy to think transistor are magic
  solid devices, they were not.
 
    raverbashing - 2 hours ago
    But as they are analog devices, there are no errors with
    transistorsThere are manufacturing defects, there are
    inefficient designs, inefficient production methods, poor
    circuit designs (like using them in common base - not wrong
    depending on the situation - instead of common emitter)
 
  mtgx - 3 hours ago
  They don't seem to be ignoring it. They are using this idea of
  "quantum volume" which incentivizes them to take into account
  both the number of qubits and the error rate to determine how
  useful their quantum computer is in solving
  problems:https://www.research.ibm.com/ibm-q/resources/quantum-
  volume....
 
rbanffy - 4 hours ago
I look forward to supercool (no pun intended) qSeries mainframes
and whatever wild OSs they'll run.Right now, it looks like it's a
batch processing like thing, with a single problem using the
machine at any given time with long setup/teardown times.
 
  krastanov - 3 hours ago
  Quantum computers will probably be simply addon hardware to
  classical computers for very long time. If a classical computer
  can solve something "efficiently", a quantum computer will not
  provide any speedup (but there are problems that are practically
  solvable only on quantum computers).
 
  Zaak - 4 hours ago
  I expect quantum computers will always run in batch mode. Storing
  quantum state in classical memory is impossible, so task
  switching would be very problematic.
 
    rbanffy - 3 hours ago
    We can try to partition the machine so your process can use
    some qubits and mine uses others. I suppose a classical
    computer would be running the OS, at least at first.
 
      Zaak - 2 hours ago
      Yeah, if you have a 5000-qubit computer and two people want
      to run 2000-qubit jobs, I can see them being able to run
      simultaneously.There will always need to be a classical
      computer running the quantum computer.
 
        rbanffy - 1 hours ago
        > There will always need to be a classical computer running
        the quantum computer.Not sure about the need, but it sure
        is convenient. Quantum computers are not always better for
        all kinds of problems and being able to route different
        jobs to different parts of the system should be an
        advantage. All this looks a lot like a digitally controlled
        analog computer or something that can program FPGAs on-the-
        fly.
 
erikj - 3 hours ago
Is this a true quantum computer? The controversy around D-Wave was
confusing.
 
  wmnwmn - 1 hours ago
  They're definitely referring to a real ("universal") quantum
  computer, not the quantum annealing devices of D-wave. Their
  computer will be able to run the Schor algorithm, if it is as
  advertised. If they have 20 qubits in two months, as they say
  they will, that seems like great progress compared to where I
  thought the field was. And if they have 50 within a couple years
  after that, it would be huge.  One caveat is they seem to be
  making a distinction between a "universal" quantum computer, and
  a "universal fault-tolerant" one. Fault-tolerance requires a lot
  more qubits so it's not clear to me how valuable even 50 will be,
  if not error-corrected. I must say I will be kind of amazed if
  quantum computers prove to be scalable the way classical ones
  have been. I'm inclined to believe that the "Church-Turing"
  thesis will ultimately prevail once the cost of construction of
  the machines is factored in (~linear growth for the classical
  machines, greater than polynomial for the quantum). But I've been
  wrong before.
 
    andrewla - 1 hours ago
    You say "If they have 20 qubits in two months" and "if they
    have 50 within a couple of years".  Doesn't the article say
    that they have 50?I'm unclear on this, because I have yet to
    see a published result talking about running Shor's algorithm
    on a quantum computer beyond the NMR-based physical simulation
    and the adiabatic one (which is just annealing). What exactly
    is IBM claiming to have done here?
 
      wmnwmn - 53 minutes ago
      I read it as saying they've passed some development
      milestones on 50 which is certainly all one could expect
      before the release of the 20.
 
      daxorid - 11 minutes ago
      They're simulating 50; they're implementing 20.
 
mtgx - 5 hours ago
Good job, IBM. You may actually be ahead of other tech companies
for once, although Google seems to be breathing down your neck in
this area. Others seem to be at least a generation or two
behind.One other thing to note is that until recently it was
believed that 50-qubit quantum computer would achieve "quantum
supremacy". However, IBM itself has shown that we can simulate
56-qubits on a classical
supercomputer.https://www.ibm.com/blogs/research/2017/10/quantum-
computing...Now let's see who gets to the 100-qubit quantum
computer first and achieves quantum supremacy.Going by recent
developments, quantum computers seem to be following a "Moore's
Law" of sorts, where their number of qubits pretty much double
every two years. We need a few more generations to be sure of this,
but it does look like this is the rate at which they are going to
evolve.D-Wave, which isn't a universal quantum computer, has in
fact been evolving at 2-4x every 2 years (closer to 2x for last few
generations).This is exciting because unlike classical computers,
quantum computers increase their performance by much more than 2x
if their number of qubits double every 2 years.
 
  bencollier49 - 4 hours ago
  Very exciting, agree - although important to mention:> unlike
  classical computers, quantum computers increase their performance
  by much more than 2x...for particular tasks.
 
    ISL - 4 hours ago
    Some of those tasks are transformative!
 
  Cyph0n - 4 hours ago
  > You may actually be ahead of other tech companies for onceIBM
  Research is and always has been an industrial research
  powerhouse. I doubt you could name a company that has contributed
  so much to so many different fields over the past few decades
  (Bell Labs is the universal exception).From [1]:"IBM Research's
  numerous contributions to physical and computer sciences include
  the Scanning Tunneling Microscope and high temperature
  superconductivity, both of which were awarded the Nobel Prize.
  IBM Research was behind the inventions of the SABRE travel
  reservation system, the technology of laser eye surgery, magnetic
  storage, the relational database, UPC barcodes and Watson, the
  question-answering computing system that won a match against
  human champions on the Jeopardy! television quiz show."[1]
  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/IBM_Research
 
    derwiki - 4 hours ago
    > won a match against human champions on the Jeopardy!
    television quiz show.I'm _much_ more impressed by Google's AI
    Go champion. And besides Watson, what has IBM Research done in
    the past 20 years? Personally I would have thought they'd be
    more involved in self-driving cars.(Disclaimer: I interned for
    IBM Research 10 years ago)
 
      Cyph0n - 4 hours ago
      IBM isn't a software-only company: they do research in
      advanced materials and semiconductor physics, low-level
      computer architecture, integrated circuit testing, and so
      on.When you look at the bigger picture, IBM Research has been
      doing amazing things.
 
        derwiki - 4 hours ago
        What stands out to you in the last 20 years?
 
          Cyph0n - 4 hours ago
          IBM has been awarded more patents per year than any other
          company for the last 24 years[1]. In 2016 alone, IBM
          published ~22 patents per day, and ended up being ~2500
          patents ahead of Samsung (#2).[1]:
          http://www-03.ibm.com/press/us/en/pressrelease/51353.wss
 
          bob_theslob646 - 3 hours ago
          Does that necessarily mean that is impressive?( I know it
          is, I am just asking for someone who may not understand
          what having that type of scale of IP enables a company to
          do.)
 
          foreigner - 2 hours ago
          I was responsible for a couple of those parents and I can
          tell you that's all nonsense.  IBM employees are
          encouraged to patent _anything_, regardless of how
          useless or silly it may be.
 
          Cyph0n - 2 hours ago
          Isn't that kind of the best strategy? You -- as a
          corporation -- want to make investments for the future.
          Each patent is a possible income stream in the future if
          the technology behind the patent somehow becomes "big".
          So it makes sense to patent everything you can, just for
          the chance of one of them to go "big".Companies can't
          just spend money on research expecting no return, at
          least not for a long time. That's what academia is built
          to do.
 
          foreigner - 12 minutes ago
          No I mean I saw some patents on downright silly stuff.
          Things completely unrelated to IBM's business or even
          tech.  IBM just wants to wave that number around.
 
nategri - 45 minutes ago
Quantum computer news! Everyone is excited and confused.
 
forapurpose - 4 hours ago
IBM also plans to offer a 20-qubit hosted service this
year.https://techcrunch.com/2017/11/10/ibm-passes-major-
milestone...
 
jest7325 - 5 minutes ago
How many qubit does it take to crack an AES 192 key?
 
JepZ - 2 hours ago
Presenting the pictures of a quantum computer with adbobe flash is
an impressive combination of technologies. I hope they are use a
different technology stack to develop the OS of that machine ;-)
 
  exikyut - 8 minutes ago
  Looks like their publishing platform is that old that it's still
  using Flickr's Flash photo embedding widget.TIL Flickr had such a
  widget.
 
  StephenMelon - 1 hours ago
  Well making Flash work on mobile is one potential use for quantum
  computing I guess? :D
 
tnash - 4 hours ago
At what point do we no longer trust public key cryptography (RSA)?
Where's the break point?
 
  mtgx - 4 hours ago
  > It is estimated that 2048-bit RSA keys could be broken on a
  quantum computer comprising 4,000 qubits and 100 million gates.
  Experts speculate that quantum computers of this size may be
  available within the next 20-30 years.https://www.entrust.com/wp-
  content/uploads/2013/05/WP_Quantu...The paper is from 2009, so
  ~2030 to break 2048-bit RSA seems about right. If they can double
  the number of qubits every two years, then we should
  have:100-qubit by 2020.200-qubit by 2022400 qubit by 2024800
  qubit by 20261600 qubit by 20283200 qubit by 20306400 qubit by
  2032.It's also possible the rate of progress will be slightly
  higher than 2x every 2 years, so doing it a few years sooner than
  that is not out of the question.Also, you have to consider that
  once you get a quantum computer that can break 2048-RSA, you'll
  be able to break all the encrypted communications you've stored
  in the past few years, too. So you can't "switch-on" the quantum-
  resistant crypto in 2031 and think you're all good. You have to
  do it as soon as possible, especially after practical quantum
  computers that are capable of scaling in a scheduled way start
  appearing (which seems to have happened).Plus, even if Google is
  super-quick to adopt quantum-resistant crypto, doesn't mean the
  rest of the internet will be, too. It could take a few more years
  for that to happen, too.
 
    marcosdumay - 3 hours ago
    From the Wikipedia timeline[1], it seems to be growing
    linearly.1 -
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Timeline_of_quantum_computing
 
    gruez - 3 hours ago
    >Also, you have to consider that once you get a quantum
    computer that can break 2048-RSA, you'll be able to break all
    the encrypted communications you've stored in the past few
    years, tooisn't that what PFS is supposed to prevent?
 
      mtgx - 3 hours ago
      PFS can slow it down a bit, but not much. Assuming before PFS
      everyone changed their keys every 3 years, and with PFS they
      change them every 2 weeks, then it should be about 80x harder
      (slower to break the encryption). 80x harder may seem like a
      lot but it's not that much in the context of quantum
      computers.Also, PFS uses 256-bit ECC, which only requires a
      512-qubit quantum computer to break it. So it's possible that
      a 4,000 qubit quantum computer, or even a smaller one, could
      break ECC with PFS even faster than it can break 2048-bit
      RSA.
 
  Zaak - 4 hours ago
  If I remember correctly, it takes a quantum computer with roughly
  2N qubits to break N-bit RSA. So we should be ok until thousand-
  qubit systems are being developed.Increasing key lengths is a
  short-term workaround, but the real solution is post-quantum
  public key encryption, which is currently an area of active
  research.
 
    gnode - 4 hours ago
    Do you know what the implications are for symmetric ciphers or
    [elliptic curve] Diffie-Hellman key exchange? I.e. will forward
    secrecy still hold up against such future quantum computing?
 
      jd007 - 3 hours ago
      SIDH (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Supersingular_isogeny_key
      _exch...) is one of the few popular post-quantum variants of
      DH key exchange, and it supports forward secrecy as well.
 
        the8472 - 36 minutes ago
        One nice property of ECC pubkeys is that they easily fit
        into UDP packets, URIs and other very compact data
        structures. Currently all post-quantum schemes have fairly
        bulky pubkeys.
 
      Zaak - 4 hours ago
      The implication for symmetric ciphers is that key lengths
      will need to be doubled. 128-bit ciphers like standard AES
      have 64-bit security against a quantum attack. I expect to
      see 256-bit keys adopted widely in the not-too-distant
      future.I don't know off the top of my head what the
      implication for key exchange would be, but I know that
      anything that depends on the discrete logarithm problem for
      security is vulnerable to a quantum attack. I believe that
      includes all forms of Diffie-Hellman.
 
        sampo - 1 hours ago
        With a quantum computer and Grover's algorithm, 128-bit AES
        is breakable in 2^64 steps. But the quantum computer still
        needs to have a 128-bit quantum memory.
 
          dsacco - 1 hours ago
          I?m not sure if you mean to be disagreeing here or simply
          adding color, but what you?re saying is the same as the
          parent comment. Grover?s algorithm allows symmetric key
          recovery for n bits in 2^(n/2) steps; as the parent
          commenter said, symmetric algorithm key sizes need to be
          doubled. A break in 2^64 steps is the same as 64-bit
          security, so changing the key size to 256-bit will offer
          128 bits of security.
 
          sampo - 59 minutes ago
          Just wanted to clarify that in this case, 64-bit quantum
          computer is not enough to break said 64-bit security,
          still need 128 bits of memory.
 
  Drakim - 4 hours ago
  It's interesting to imagine what connected planet with no
  reliable encryption would be like.Although I guess we can always
  fall back on one-time pads.
 
    darawk - 4 hours ago
    Quantum computers don't break all encryption. There's no risk
    of that, fortunately.
 
      jayess - 4 hours ago
      Please expand on that. What encryption is vulnerable and what
      isn't?
 
        mickronome - 3 hours ago
        I don't know a lot about it, only just enough to know what
        search term to look for, and Wikipedia had an article that
        probably fits the bill: https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki
        /Post-quantum_cryptography
 
          jwilk - 3 hours ago
          Non-mobile link:https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Post-
          quantum_cryptography
 
        Zaak - 3 hours ago
        Symmetric encryption will need to double key lengths, such
        as using 256-bit AES keys instead of 128-bit.All currently
        popular forms of asymmetric / public key encryption
        (including RSA and ECC) are vulnerable to quantum attack.
 
    [deleted]
 
powertower - 2 hours ago
I've been following quantum computing since D-Wave made its press
release some years back. Now I'm a complete skeptic.The huge red
flag I can't get over is if it is as so, why can no one validate it
after all this time?Why is there the proverbial "it works but not
in the way you think it works" (i.e., quantum annealing) or "it
works but we can use non-QM systems to simulate it faster, better,
cheaper by a factor of a trillion"?If QM computing was truly
feasible (assuming that QM does have an underlining phenomena that
is physically real), why are the results after all this time so
fuzzy?
 
  Certhas - 2 hours ago
  Because you have to build the quantum computer in a world that is
  overwhelmingly classical.There are no qualifiers along the lines
  of "underlying phenomena". It's simply difficult to get a stable
  enough interface between the classical and the quantum, so you
  can control it, while at the same time isolating it enough that
  it doesn't decohere to classicality.Who knows, maybe reliable
  scalable quantum computation truly isn't feasible for some
  reason, but if you study the physics, the fact that this is so
  hard is not really a surprise.
 
    powertower - 1 hours ago
    But they have already solved the engineering problems (at least
    10 years ago).They already have "qbits".The interface issues
    look to be 98% solved.And the temperature cooling, the EM
    shielding, and everything else (that is outside the circuitry
    design and the physical chipset), a person with a budget of
    80,000 USD can recreated in his garage.Its the results I can't
    understand.Why can't X qbits, in the time they stay coherent,
    produce results that agree with the mathematical analysis of
    the setup? Why is it always off by a factor so large that its
    not even productive for any task.My understanding of it is not
    complete, this is why I ask. Is the interface issue only 2%
    solved (and not 98%), etc.?
 
darawk - 4 hours ago
The article appears to be saying that they are offering an actual
quantum computer as a service, but as I recall, their previous
offering was a simulation of a quantum computing environment. Yet,
this same article refers to that thing as if it were a real QC.
This makes me skeptical that the thing being offered here is a real
quantum computer...Anyone here have any insight into whether this
is legitimate?
 
  derwiki - 4 hours ago
  Nothing specific to whether this claim is legitimate, but lately
  IBM has a tendency to make bold claims about tech that can't be
  backed up (e.g. Watson).
 
  davidw - 54 minutes ago
  It's both a real quantum computer and a simulation - at the same
  time - but you don't know until you observe the results!
 
  jameshclark - 4 hours ago
  The last news from IBM on HN about their quantum offering was
  that they had optimised the memory required for simulating
  quantum computers. 50-qubits seemed to the the upper limit
  before, but they managed to simulate a 56-qubit circuit. It was a
  good read: https://arxiv.org/abs/1710.05867They've had real
  hardware for a while, though, and they have 5-qubit and 16-qubit
  machines that anyone can try via IBM Q experience.So this is 100%
  legit as far as I'm concerned.
 
    GreenOceanBlue - 2 hours ago
    There is no such thing as a quantum computer in 2017. It is
    fantasy.
 
  andrewflnr - 4 hours ago
  Not an expert, but I do find some of the phrasing weird. Early on
  they talk about improvements to connectivity and packaging, which
  would seem to only be relevant to real, live, physical quantum
  computers. There's also the professor talking about having
  students run programs on real quantum computers, without any
  qualifiers (that were included here, anyway) about how it's
  actually a simulation. Later it talks about software tools,
  including a Jupyter notebook for heaven's sake, without
  mentioning the vast gulf between that and what they seem to claim
  at the top of the article. I'm tempted to say that the author of
  this press release simply doesn't understand the difference.
 
  vtomole - 4 hours ago
  Their previous offerings have been 2 physical quantum computers
  that can be accessed over the cloud. One with 5 qubits, and
  another with 16 qubits[0]. These computers have had thousands of
  users who have run millions of quantum algorithms [1].[0]: https:
  //www-03.ibm.com/press/us/en/pressrelease/52403.wss[1]:https://ww
  w.engadget.com/2017/11/10/ibm-50-qubit-quantum-com...
 
    Xeoncross - 3 hours ago
    Wait, I didn't think we had actual quantum computers yet.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Quantum_computing
 
      vtomole - 2 hours ago
      We've had quantum computers since the 90's. We just haven't
      had "useful" quantum computers yet [0].An implementation of
      quantum computers that is currently flourishing is one that
      is built out of superconducting circuits. This makes it
      easier to scale the quantum computer because you can leverage
      existing nanoelectronic fabrication techniques [1].[0]: https
      ://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Timeline_of_quantum_computing[1]: ht
      tps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Superconducting_quantum_comput...
 
        Xeoncross - 2 hours ago
        > "We've had quantum computers since the 90's".It wasn't
        until 2005 we had the first (probable) qubyte created at
        the University of Innsbruck in Austria.
 
          kevin_thibedeau - 2 hours ago
          You don't need bytes to do computation.
 
      joe_the_user - 2 hours ago
      From your link: "A small 16-qubit quantum computer exists and
      is available for hobbyists to experiment with via the IBM
      quantum experience project."
 
        Xeoncross - 2 hours ago
        From the link in that sentence: "The IBM Quantum Experience
        (QX) enables anyone to ... ... explore tutorials and
        simulations around what might be possible with quantum
        computing."
 
          joe_the_user - 2 hours ago
          That sentences doesn't say the small 5 and 16 bit
          computers don't exist.Edit: if you read the whole link,
          the key description is:"IBM?s quantum processor is made
          up of superconducting transmon qubits, located in a
          dilution refrigerator at the IBM Research headquarters at
          the Thomas J. Watson Research Center.Users interact with
          the quantum processor through the quantum circuit model
          of computation, applying quantum gates on the qubits
          using a GUI called the quantum composer, writing quantum
          assembly language code[1] or through a Python
          API.[2]"Which is to say you have both a quantum computer
          and a simulator in IBM schema (which in the cloud 'cause
          you can't have supercooled chips in your basement), which
          is as one would expect running "real" quantum computing
          is going to be more expensive and uncertain now despite
          the hope it will give vast speed later.
 
      GreenOceanBlue - 2 hours ago
      We don't.
 
        pault - 2 hours ago
        These types of replies aren't helpful. If you disagree with
        the claim please provide some specific reasons why.
 
Xeoncross - 2 hours ago
Quantum computing reminds me of time travel for all the same
reasons. This is not a quick win.How would you even validate you
built a quantum computer?
 
  nradov - 1 hours ago
  If you run something like Shor's algorithm you can validate it
  using a stopwatch and pocket calculator.
 
  comicjk - 2 hours ago
  Quantum computers can be simulated classically, in a timeframe
  exponentially related to the number of qubits. So as long as the
  quantum computer is not too big you can compare the results to an
  exact classical simulation and see if it works. The current
  record for classical simulation is 56 qubits
  (https://arxiv.org/abs/1710.05867). This is an active area of
  research, since we want to be able to check the early-generation
  quantum computers carefully.
 
thibran - 4 hours ago
Does the appearance of quantum computers mean that the
effectiveness of programming languages becomes secondary and that
ease-of-use/expressiveness will be the most valued trait?
 
  Zaak - 4 hours ago
  No. Quantum computers are very specialized devices. They allow
  massive speedups for certain applications, and no benefit at all
  for general-purpose computing.I expect to see a flourishing of
  quantum programming languages with which to write code for
  quantum computers, but that's a different subject.
 
[deleted]