GOPHERSPACE.DE - P H O X Y
gophering on hngopher.com
HN Gopher Feed (2017-11-08) - page 1 of 10
 
___________________________________________________________________
19 people a week overdose in Richmond, dozens die, and hundreds
being revived
42 points by iamjeff
http://www.richmond.com/news/virginia/nineteen-people-a-week-ove...
___________________________________________________________________
 
mustacheemperor - 27 minutes ago
Queue moralizing arguments that the overdoses would go away if we
stopped reviving hundreds. The characterizations people make of the
victims of opioid addictions are saddening and astoundingly cruel.
 
jcmoscon - 25 minutes ago
Maybe all these drugs being dumped in USA is really part of an evil
plan from an enemy nation to destroy this country by destroying its
people. Check out this book "Red Cocaine" to see how cocaine
traffic started in America.
 
  craftyguy - 16 minutes ago
  or, maybe some folks just want an escape from stress / real
  life.or, maybe they got hooked after being perscribed painkillers
  for an injuryor, maybe they're suffering from some mental
  illnessor, literally any number of other reasons besides some
  evil nation flooding the US with drugs and somehow 'forcing'
  citizens to take them.The point is, you can choose to go after
  the suppliers, but the underlying problem is still there. Until
  that's addressed (mental healthcare, serious punishment for over-
  perscription, etc), we'll just see a new drug take the place of
  the old.
 
  nkrisc - 3 minutes ago
  Even if that was true, they're only supplying the match; we built
  the bonfire.
 
jenkstom - 44 minutes ago
The opioid epidemic is huge. Legal Cannabis is helping in some
places, but it's still illegal at the federal level.
 
iambateman - 6 minutes ago
Serious questions...if you?ve used an opioid more than once for
recreational purposes, I?d like to hear (1) what prompted you to
try it (2) how old you were (3) cost (4) where did you get them (5)
why did you stopTreat me like an idiot, I don?t understand this
stuff and I?d like to know more.* obviously feel free to use a
burner account if you?d rather not speak publicly.
 
  miguelrochefort - 4 minutes ago
  It's mostly people that started medicating for chronic pain.
 
mschuster91 - 42 minutes ago
> Local jails have been overrun with people locked up and in need
of treatmentWhy. Do. People. End. Up. In. Jail. Seriously this one
is beyond my comprehension - they need treatment, not jails filled
with hardened criminals, rapists and probably more (and nastier)
drugs than on the street.
 
  [deleted]
 
  tomjen3 - 25 minutes ago
  Some of them are probably there for crimes like theft
  prostitution and selling to sustain their habits. Another
  significant part would be those who violate parole or drug
  treatment programs.
 
  dreamdu5t - 21 minutes ago
  And if a drug addict doesn't want treatment? The elephant in the
  room is forced intervention requires a form of imprisonment.
 
    tcj_phx - 12 minutes ago
    > And if a drug addict doesn't want treatment?Switzerland gives
    their most hopeless heroin addicts free heroin, and a safe
    place to use it. [0]A friend's son was expelled from his US
    high school for dealing heroin - this was probably 12 years
    ago. Addicts have to advertise to their friends to be able to
    afford their habit.[0]
    http://www.citizensopposingprohibition.org/resources/swiss-h...
 
    senorjazz - 11 minutes ago
    There will always be the hardcore who will not, or cannot
    overcome their addictions. But this is few.Why not give them
    free medical grade heroin, in a safe environment?* Keeps them
    off the streets. * They no longer need to resort to crime to
    fund their addictions. * Besides their appointed time to get
    their dose, they can lead relatively normal productive lives.It
    will save $$$$ and also keep money out of pockets of organised
    crime.win:win in my book
 
  Danihan - 41 minutes ago
  War on drugs & big government.
 
    knowaveragejoe - 38 minutes ago
    Realistically it starts with the race to the bottom WRT being
    "tough on crime".
 
      Danihan - 26 minutes ago
      Being tough on crimes that have victims is just fine.Being
      tough on victimless crimes is absurd.It's truly very black
      and white.
 
  sp332 - 36 minutes ago
  It's a long story.
  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Deinstitutionalisation#Consequ...
 
  ransom1538 - 34 minutes ago
  Like my uncle says, a cop, "what would we do then".  Drug &
  alcohol related arrests are 99% of their work.
 
    nilved - 31 minutes ago
    We really need to get rid of cops.  That experiment is over.
 
    tytytytytytytyt - 29 minutes ago
    Put them in treatment centers?
 
    adamson - 28 minutes ago
    Adding cops is pretty low on the list of reasonable jobs
    programs
 
    dragontamer - 2 minutes ago
    Its not a cop's job. Its a social worker's job.I do recognize
    that cops are just "trying to help", and that no one cares
    about social workers. Cops are in an advantaged position in the
    USA because they are relatively well respected by most
    mainstream members of the population. So the fact that they
    want to help is good.But Cops aren't given the right training
    to deal with medical problems or other problems (ie: Fire
    hazards. In theory, cops could be the ones to inspect Fire
    Hazards in buildings, but realistically, its better for Firemen
    to do it).There are lots of social work jobs in America. A big
    problem, a seriously big one... is that we expect Cops to do
    any job. Erm... no. Have drug specialists deal with the drug
    problem. Cops really shouldn't shoulder the burden of
    everything in the country.-------Cops should focus on the
    distribution of drugs. Not on the users of the drugs. The users
    need treatment, mental treatment that cops do not have the
    abilities to give.These drug abusers need nurses and social
    workers to check up on them every few hours. Not cops.
 
AdmiralAsshat - 39 minutes ago
This reminds me that the lead singer of GWAR died in Richmond from
a heroin overdose in 2014:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dave_Brockie
 
PatientTrades - 36 minutes ago
Most of this stems from the overprescription of opioids. I remember
when I had surgery for a broken leg the amount of drugs I received
after the surgery was astounding. It was almost as if the hospital
wanted me to become hooked. I didn't need or ask for the opioids,
they were just prescribed for pain killing. A regular Tylenol or
Advil would have done the job. Not saying hospitals want people on
drugs, but at some point we have hold the people initially
prescribing the drugs accountable.
 
  ellyagg - 30 minutes ago
  What makes you say that? It's trivial to get opioids on the
  streets and it's common to be introduced to them as a
  recreational drug, as I know first hand.In fact, I don't know
  anyone who got addicted to opioids due to overprescription, but I
  know several people who didn't get prescribed opioids they needed
  because of the fears of overprescription, and thus were left in
  terrible pain. I don't know how you draw the line, but I think
  it's evil to leave people in pain because you're afraid they'll
  use the drugs for fun. Most people who take opioids do not get
  addicted.
 
    munk-a - 22 minutes ago
    People generally say that over-prescription leads to harder
    opioid usage because it does.  I have had co-workers familiar
    with the neurological effects of the drugs they've been given
    balk at it.  I've also known community members who had injuries
    slide into the obscurity of addiction.A very real factor of
    this crisis is the pain aversion, people working in dentistry
    have higher rates of depression and suicide due to the
    psychological effects of inflicting pain on people (unless the
    dentist is played by steve martin ofc) and it's a problem
    without clear solutions.  Legalization of marijuana would
    probably help reduce the mild-moderate pain classes in a non-
    addictive manner, but for extreme pain there isn't a good
    solution.Anyways... there are plenty of first-hand accounts and
    plenty of studies showing the connection here, please do a
    little research before posting unsupported claims.
 
    gebeeson - 11 minutes ago
    I went through open heart surgery two years ago April and
    opioid over-prescription was already a concern. After discharge
    I received a six day script for the lowest dose of fentanyl and
    a month of Lyrica. I have a freakishly high pain tolerance so I
    managed to 'stretch' the fentanyl patches out to nearly one
    month (each patch lasted roughly three days). Hindsight being
    what it is - I obviously made it through. Being down in it
    though, it was far far less than pleasant. Especially that I
    was supposed to be active and all the usual recovery stuff. It
    was a bit of no joke as far as pain load goes. I didn't expect
    to be completely pain free as that isn't life as far as I am
    concerned, it would have been nice to have taken a little bit
    more of the edge off. Round the pain off some.
 
  snuxoll - 8 minutes ago
  It's incredibly easy to get hooked when taking prescription
  opiates even if you're fully aware of the situation. I had a
  wisdom tooth extracted last year, and by the time the pain was
  finally down to the level I could manage with OTC pain relievers
  I realized I had developed a mild physical addiction to the
  hydrocodone.I had no desire to get high off the pain killers,
  hell, they didn't even do anything for me in that regard - but I
  could feel the need to take them. I can easily see how someone
  without the awareness, willpower and a number of other factors
  could give in and start down the path of self-destruction. It was
  a terrifying place for me to be in, and as someone who has
  responsibly taken prescription opiates for multiple other oral
  surgeries as well as a septoplasty it was one I never thought
  possible.
 
jrowley - 35 minutes ago
Just the other morning I got off of bart in downtown Oakland, 12th
street and there was a guy just laid out, unresponsive right on the
steps outside the station. He had smoked something out of a can. I
stuck with the guy while the paramedics came, but the most tragic
part was that he had a plastic "No Allergies" bracelet on. When the
paramedics took off his shirt he still had adhesive on his skin
from the EKG straps or what not. So he had gotten out of the
hospital and then immediately ODed (presumably again).I'm not sure
what we need to do, but if you haven't encountered the epidemic
first hand, it's only a matter of time until you do.
 
  nathancahill - 31 minutes ago
  Yep. My uncle died from an OD earlier this year. Drugs cut with
  fentanyl. It's truly a terrible epidemic.
 
    [deleted]
 
  sillysaurus3 - 12 minutes ago
  [removed]
 
    ghrifter - 10 minutes ago
    what the fuck are you on about? wrong thread?
 
      sillysaurus3 - 8 minutes ago
      No, actually, I'm trying to have a nuanced conversation on a
      sensitive topic with an open mind.I get the feeling this is
      one of the things that no one wants to discuss, or at least
      it's a bad idea to try to discuss it.Note how violent and
      immediate the reaction was, right when I tried to point to a
      segment of people who are the most likely to be in the target
      segment of the original article. I don't feel like martyring
      myself, so I won't push it further. But suffice to say, it
      does not seem like we as a society are ready to have hard
      conversations about why people turn to drugs.
 
        daxorid - moments ago
        When the status gap is large enough, high status people
        don't see low status people as human. Very few people on HN
        will care about incels killing themselves. Suicide hotlines
        and support programs are for their status peers fallen on
        hard times, not the filthy incels who dare act above their
        station.
 
    andrestan - 10 minutes ago
    Probably the wrong thread :)
 
    [deleted]
 
    spaceseaman - 2 minutes ago
    You're implying the opioid epidemic is in part due to Reddit
    banning subreddits filled with hateful speech? Or what? You're
    also making some odd as hell "both sides"-ish argument
    somewhere in there that I can't even parse.I'm sorry, but we
    don't have to give spaces for people to be hateful - Reddit
    banning those assholes was the highlight of my week. I'm not
    trying to claim that these people should just be ignored, but
    you're conflating very separate problems.More importantly, the
    people being affected by the opioid crisis are predominantly
    not members of these hateful groups, and I'm pretty frustrated
    you would conflate them in such a way just so you can have an
    excuse to talk about the loss of a safe space for hateful
    rhetoric.