GOPHERSPACE.DE - P H O X Y
gophering on hngopher.com
HN Gopher Feed (2017-11-08) - page 1 of 10
 
___________________________________________________________________
Beer giant ABI bought many craft brews and is now buying beer
rating websites
133 points by coloneltcb
http://www.foodandpower.net/2017/11/02/abis-venture-capital-fund...
___________________________________________________________________
 
sushisource - 1 hours ago
I have a hard time getting worked up over these acquisitions. If
the beer is still good, who cares? If you're really upset about it,
there are still literally thousands of other craft breweries to
choose from.
 
  hylianwarrior - 1 hours ago
  Nice sentiment, but it's a bit unnerving to see an industry
  consolidating like this while ALSO buying out sites that review
  the beer. Having few large, central corporations control both the
  market and the medium by which the products are reviewed is not a
  good thing.
 
    [deleted]
 
    civilian - 1 hours ago
    The reviewing sites thing is silly.However, it sure seems like
    an opportunity for new beer reviewing websites to pop up!
 
      usrusr - 1 hours ago
      If Underarmour refuses to buy your running tracker, pivot to
      a beer review site!
 
    jxramos - 1 hours ago
    I guess the tricky thing would be measuring what they do the
    site. If they take it down or delete negative reviews, etc,
    that would be some questionable behavior. If they use it to
    gain honest feedback and funnel it into development channels of
    some kind that could prove interesting. Overall seems like a
    conflict of interest.I wonder how much appetite they'd have to
    buy up the next review site that pops up and catches on. Sort
    of like review site whak-a-mole. It would be very disconcerting
    to say the least if a company went out and bought up all new
    and fledgling review sites of interest to them.
 
      cma - 44 minutes ago
      A public review site is public. You don't need to buy it to
      gain honest feedback.
 
  sp332 - 1 hours ago
  How do you know the beer is still good if the manufacturer owns
  the review site?
 
    cbsmith - 1 hours ago
    Taste it?
 
      aj_g - 1 hours ago
      What if you can't taste it because your local grocery store
      stocks its beer selection based on what beers are the best
      according to the beer review site owned by ABI? It's not as
      simple as "just make a different choice", monopolies can
      exert control over the whole system the consumer lives in,
      not just the small decisions.
 
        TylerE - 59 minutes ago
        Don't be naive. They stock beer based on who PAYS THEM the
        most for their shelf space. Same goes for any other
        product.
 
      sp332 - 1 hours ago
      As in, assume the review sites are compromised and ignore
      them, but also give money to the company that might or might
      not be posting biased reviews there? So you're only denying
      yourself the potential benefit of the review site while still
      giving up your money.
 
      kiddico - 1 hours ago
      "there are still literally thousands of other craft breweries
      to choose from."Taste all of them? I'm not an alcoholic by
      trade man, reviews are necessary.
 
  unethical_ban - 1 hours ago
  Brewing these days is uniquely local. When buying craft, you're
  buying not only good beer, but you're supporting your neighbors
  and fellow enthusiasts in the craft. When a beer gets bought by
  the big conglomerates, the feeling of supporting "the little guy"
  goes away.I know multiple people who stopped buying Karbach beers
  after they got bought. Sure they'll drink it if it's free, but
  why support bean counters and 1%ers when you can give some money
  to the people doing it for love?
 
  jdavis703 - 1 hours ago
  What people don't like are the bad business practices, like
  buying up review sites (can anyone spell "conflict of interest"),
  locking in alcohol distributors to certain brands, etc. They're
  limiting consumer choice, locking out competitors and potentially
  misleading consumers.I'll agree with you, if it tastes good it
  tastes good. McDonald's also still tastes good to me, but I abhor
  their business practices so I avoid eating there.A lot of
  economists like to cite this model of a "rational agent," but
  consumers have more dimensions than just price and quality,
  increasingly they also see ethics as either a part of quality, or
  an additional dimension, when judging which product they should
  buy.
 
    sushisource - 1 hours ago
    I get that, but, as I mention you've still got thousands of
    other options to choose from
 
      itchyjunk - 1 hours ago
      Yes, this was one of the thousands of other options. Emphasis
      on was. What guarantee do I have that once people move to
      another platform and start trusting it, they won't purchase
      that?
 
      thinkling - 1 hours ago
      When restaurants and bars use an AB InBev-owned distributor
      and thus are restricted to only having AB InBev brands on
      tap, I lose the choice to drink one of those thousands of
      other beers when I'm there. Not going to a concert because
      the venue has the wrong beer distributor is not really
      tractable.
 
  tomc1985 - 1 hours ago
  It won't be that way much longer if these events are allowed to
  happen
 
  svarrall - 1 hours ago
  That was my initial though to. Here?s a good discussion from
  Sessionable on the subject from independent breweries perspective
  and their main concerns seem to be around  access to taps and
  consumer awareness when independents get bought
  out.https://overcast.fm/+BwaxYul7M
 
  gniv - 1 hours ago
  The beer is still good, until it isn't. As an anecdote: A
  Lagunitas beer [1] used to be a favorite of mine. At some point I
  didn't like it anymore, and stopped buying it. I didn't know they
  got bought by Heineken, and I don't know if the events are
  related, but it's possible.[1] Little Sumpin' Sumpin'
 
    mohaine - 1 hours ago
    Small changes over time is what killed Schlitz. A once famous
    brand that you probably haven't heard of if under
    40.https://beerconnoisseur.com/articles/how-milwaukees-
    famous-b...
 
      uxp100 - 47 minutes ago
      Since that article is from 2010, it's worth noting that
      Schlitz was relaunched, probably shortly after that article
      came out. Mainly in tall boys, boasting the original 1960s
      recipe. It is what it is.
 
elliotec - 1 hours ago
I'm getting a 500 "Error establishing a database connection"
 
  firloop - 1 hours ago
  Guess ABI got the site too...
 
    danschumann - 1 hours ago
    Aw man, I was going to say that.
 
  jrs235 - 1 hours ago
  Cached:
  http://webcache.googleusercontent.com/search?q=cache:qhVnlV7...
 
  macNchz - 1 hours ago
  Here's a cached version:
  http://webcache.googleusercontent.com/search?q=cache:qhVnlV7...
 
arkadiyt - 1 hours ago
This article about Casper purchasing mattress review sites was
making the rounds recently as well. Great
read:https://www.fastcompany.com/3065928/sleepopolis-casper-
blogg...
 
  Aloha - 1 hours ago
  I love my Casper Mattress, I think longingly of it when I'm on
  the road for work... but this gives me pause.. just a little.
 
    Johnny555 - 46 minutes ago
    People also love their Leesa mattresses and their Tuft & Needle
    mattresses and their Purple mattresses and their Ghostbed
    mattresses, and so on.Online memory foam mattresses have become
    a bit of a commodity and the biggest distinguishing factor
    between them appears to be the marketing (and legal) budget.
 
    fluxic - 1 hours ago
    I too love my Casper ? mattress, by far the world's best-ever
    mattress, made from ethical mattress materials and guaranteed
    to provide you with a sumptuous sleep, night after night!Here,
    fellow sleepers, join our club of nocturnal nobles at
    https://casper.com! Be sure to use my referral code "REAL_HNer"
    when you place your order. With Casper ? you pay for
    quality?but once you lay down for the first time, you'll
    realize it's so, so worth it!?
 
      dabockster - 7 minutes ago
      Nice, just bought 100k!
 
    j_s - 39 minutes ago
    https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=15489344Zinus' claim to
    fame: replace your mattress at least once more for the same
    total price. Based on the anecdata I was terrified it would
    attack me! (Verdict: a bit more firm that I prefer, but still
    an improvement on ancient of
    days.)https://amzn.com/dp/B00Q7EPSHI - $261.28 for me
 
      jameskegel - 23 minutes ago
      My Zinus mattress actually did attack me, but it is the best
      thing I've ever slept
      on.https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=15490495
 
    paul7986 - 34 minutes ago
    Your Casper matrress that they paid a Chinese outsourcing
    company to make and paid less then $100 for one mattress. While
    you paid $500 or more for it.  Yet you could have gone to
    AliExpress and bought the same none branded mattress for
    $100.Also and hmmm does a hacker newser really love their
    Casper or do they work for them?  Casper obviously trolls the
    Internet for the better of themselves!
 
  eggpy - 7 minutes ago
  HN discussion https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=15488618
 
  username223 - 1 hours ago
  LOL!  I know Casper well from the skip button on my podcast
  player, and could hardly care less about mattresses.  This bubble
  is getting pretty big.
 
PatientTrades - 1 hours ago
If the beer taste great and is inexpensive I don't see how anybody
can have a problem with that.
 
  tomc1985 - 1 hours ago
  Some care about where it's made, how it's made, who made itThe
  beer that "tastes great" and is also "inexpensive" usually cuts
  corners in one of the above areas
 
    rockostrich - 1 hours ago
    To be completely honest as someone who loves craft beer,
    homebrews, and hopes to open up a brewery of my own one day,
    ABInbev is a brewery operations wonder of the world.  Yes, they
    use a ton of rice as one of their fermentables which cuts down
    on calories, alcohol, body, etc., but that's sort of what the
    american light lager has evolved into anyway.  The real amazing
    thing about ABInbev is how they have production breweries
    across the world making the same beers and no matter where you
    are they taste exactly the same.  They sell in the hundreds of
    millions of barrels annually while the best small breweries
    that have recently expanded rapidly and are battling with
    quality control (Trillium and Tree House are the 2 that come to
    mind) still only sell tens of thousands of barrels
    annually.Beer aside, ABInbev is the definition of an evil
    company.  The beer industry is known for being a community more
    than a competitive industry.  Craft breweries collaborate with
    their "competitors" all the time.  Even in close quarters such
    as Brooklyn/Queens, Other Half, Interboro, Transmitter, LIC
    Beer Project, Threes, Grimm, and Evil Twin are collaborating on
    beers with each other every other month or so.  It's one of the
    reasons why I love the industry so much.  ABInbev does pretty
    much the opposite.  Sure, Goose Island still collaborates with
    breweries as a subsidy of ABInbev, but as a company ABInbev
    offers incentives to bars/bottle shops/wholesalers/distributors
    that require them to only carry ABInbev owned products or a
    certain percent of their products.For example [1]:> Under the
    new incentive plan, AB InBev refunds 75 percent of this money
    if its beers make up 98 percent of the distributor?s sales,
    according to documents provided to lawmakers by AB InBev.Even
    with these incentives, craft beer is slowly taking market share
    away from ABInbev and they're are starting to feel it (although
    they still have something like a 40% market share so it's not
    that huge of a blow).  I can't speak for other beer
    conglomerates (SABMillerCoors, Heineken, etc.) and if they try
    and give similar incentives, but I know for a fact that ABInbev
    is trying to kill any competition in an industry where everyone
    is rooting for their "competitors" to succeed.[1]
    https://www.reuters.com/article/us-a-b-i-craftbeers-probe-ex...
 
  cheeze - 1 hours ago
  I have a problem with anticompetitive practices from ABI
 
  barake - 1 hours ago
  The big alcohol companies force distbutors to carry certain
  products, or even not carry comepetitors products.An example: you
  want to keep selling a macro like Bud or scopes that makes up 40%
  of your revenue ? Drop that local brewery, we have a ?craft? IPA
  to sub out.They get the revenue the same, you get the illusion of
  choice, and the new company gets to pound sand.
 
    yock - 1 hours ago
    Many states have laws forcing producers of alcoholic beverages
    to use distributors in the first place. It's state law that
    creates the bottleneck which allows the big players to
    monopolize the market in the first place.
 
      barake - 1 hours ago
      This would be a problem even with direct distribution. Just
      replace distributor with retailer.Here in Kentucky, AB Inbev
      owned a distributor and was quietly playing these games.
      After some shenanigans, KY adjusted the three tier rules to
      prevent breweries owning distributors, even if they?re from
      out of state.FWIW the three tier system is dumb and should go
      away. But removing it doesn?t automatically level the playing
      field.
 
        rockostrich - 55 minutes ago
        > This would be a problem even with direct distribution.
        Just replace distributor with retailer.This is false.
        Breweries that make great beer have no problem selling out
        of their beer when they only sell packaged beer at the
        brewery.  Examples include Tree House, Trillium, Hill
        Farmstead, Other Half, LIC Beer Project, Interboro, Night
        Shift (who actually own a distribution company now, but
        they sell out of new releases at the brewery within a day
        or 2), Monkish, Cellarmaker, the Veil, and many more in
        pretty much any major city that you can think of.  Hell,
        Boston and New York have a half dozen each and new
        breweries are still popping up that are selling out of beer
        without distributing.I agree that the 3 tier system is
        stupid, but breweries have proven over the past decade that
        they can scale up to 10k+ barrels per year without
        distributing a single thing.
 
          barake - 34 minutes ago
          Sorry I wasn?t clear, only talking about retail
          distribution, not direct package sales.No question plenty
          of breweries have found a way to be successful outside of
          normal retail. But they should be able to distribute,
          without large multinationals strong arming retailers in
          to not carrying competitors products.Absolutely agree
          that many breweries have been successful not distributing
 
    [deleted]
 
  lovich - 1 hours ago
  The free market has an assumption on equal information between
  agents in the system. If a company is buying up the sources of
  information on it's product that usually leads to a massive
  information imbalance
 
jakub_g - 57 minutes ago
I got this on my Twitter feed
yesterday:https://www.takecraftback.com"Help us raise $213 billion
we need to buy AB InBev"Biggest crowdfounding ever :)
 
baq - 1 hours ago
vertical integration!
 
gervase - 1 hours ago
Given the remarkably shady business practices of the entrenched
players (past and present), I don't consider this relentless
consolidation to be desirable. Additionally, in other markets where
such consolidation has happened, it has historically not been
beneficial for consumers (internet access, cell providers, etc).I
primarily interact with this market via the grocery store, not the
bar tap, but I find this app [0] to be useful in that context. It
makes it relatively painless to leverage my (minuscule) purchasing
power to support small businesses, and reject these kinds of
intentionally-obscured corporate maneuvers.[0]:
http://www.craftcheckapp.com/
 
[deleted]
 
jimrandomh - 4 minutes ago
A reviewer that represents themself as impartial, but is partially
owned by a company whose products it's reviewing, is committing
fraud. The only way to make it not-fraud is to put up disclaimers
large enough that people will treat it like an advertising
brochure.
 
kodt - 1 hours ago
I don't really understand their interest in RateBeer, RateBeer
really does not seem that relevant today. 10 years ago it was very
important in the craft beer scene. Now it seems like a dying
community.In terms of reviewing beers, most people have moved to
using an app like Untappd. BeerAdvocate, another forum/beer rating
site seems to have a more active userbase, but even that is
becoming less relevant today as people move away from forum
communities.Is that data on RateBeer of use to them? Are they
planning on pouring money into it to position it as a competitor to
Untappd? I'm not sure what the goal is. If the fear is they will
secretly skew review scores to favor their product lines, that
seems hardly worth the effort, as I don't think enough people use
the site to drive purchasing decisions to make a meaningful
impact.I think people need to be aware of which beer publications
ZX Ventures owns, or owns a stake in, as that will help you
identify marketing fluff pieces vs real reporting. The fact that
they go to some effort to hide their ownership of several brands
they have acquired is concerning to me, but I also understand it is
not in their interest to promote that fact. Many people unknowingly
buy ABI products without having any idea the beer they are buying
isn't in fact locally owned.
 
  byproxy - 1 hours ago
  I don't even care about other people's beer ratings. I just use
  RateBeer/BeerAdvocate to lookup ABV and caloric information.
 
    mywittyname - 48 minutes ago
    Same.  As a whole, the American craft beer drinkers are
    obsessed with really hoppy beers, which I hate.   So the
    ratings are completely useless, because a beer I hate will be
    like a 4.5 while a beer I love will be a 3.3.There's definitely
    an opportunity here for a better beer rating system.  Get some
    equipment to analyze the chemical compounds of beers,
    automatically classify them and use it to recommend beers based
    on your personal flavor preferences.
 
      newlyretired - 22 minutes ago
      Check out beergraphs.com, it has lots of different
      normalization lenses that might get you what you want.
      Founded by some baseball stathead writers, so takes a lot of
      the same approaches to data.
 
      heywire - 39 minutes ago
      Check out Untappd
 
    bkjelden - 6 minutes ago
    Expressing a beer rating as an average has always seemed
    problematic to me because different folks' tastes in beer vary
    so much.I'd rather have an app that looked at what I've highly
    rated and either paired me with users who highly rate similar
    beers, or just recommended beers those folks also rate highly
    that I haven't tried.In practice, I just have a few friends
    that I know have similar beer tastes as me that I regularly
    swap recommendations with.
 
  [deleted]
 
  robryan - 53 minutes ago
  Probably about the SEO, when you google most beers the RateBeer
  page will rank pretty highly.
 
ben1040 - 4 minutes ago
The Brewers Association recently put out a new label insignia that
independent craft breweries could use, to signify they're actually
an independent operation.I can see why they do it; my grocery store
recently saw a huge influx of new craft brands in the refrigerated
section and it turned out that _all_ of them were A-B products.A-B
had a bunch of the former owners/brewmasters release a series of
video interviews to dump on the idea.https://vimeo.com/223773287The
video ends with the founder of Elysian saying to be truly
independent and "punk" would be to do your own thing and not use
the BA's logo.  It's sort of funny in the face of Elysian scrubbing
their website of mentions of their "Loser Pale Ale," a collab with
Sub Pop Records.The label proudly declared, "corporate beer still
sucks."
 
  eggpy - 2 minutes ago
  "We're all independent together!"Also, what's A-B?
 
arca_vorago - 3 minutes ago
Is it crazy my first thought is I wonder if I could make a beer
website real fast and try and sell it to em. Prob would have to
sockpuppet the traffic but nooo nobody in SV does that its
immoral!/s
 
tptacek - 36 minutes ago
Consolidation in the beer market bothers me less than it does my
beer nerd friends. Many of the best-known, most-loved independent
breweries run into major quality problems trying to scale up their
output. ABI probably has advantages in regulating quality.
Breweries that don't want to scale are unlikely to sell in the
first place.The whiskey market is almost entirely consolidated; you
have to go out of your way to find quality products that aren't
traceable to large concerns, despite a proliferation of brands. But
we're in a 2-decade renaissance in whiskey quality (despite the No
Age Statement movement!) and availability. The median big-brand
whiskey is overwhelmingly more likely to be good than the median
independent whiskey.The barriers to entry for beer are far, far
lower than for whiskey. We're not going to run out of
microbreweries, or of interesting new beers. Why are beer nerds so
freaked out about this?(I have nothing useful to say about beer
rating sites, which I think are pretty sketchy to begin with.)
 
  pslam - 14 minutes ago
  The UK was an example of consolidation resulting in terrible
  quality and limited choice. The "CAMRA" (CAMpaign for Real Ale)
  group is a result of push-back against this, and has been very
  successful: http://www.camra.org.uk/key-events-in-
  camra-s-historyDistribution all the way down the chain was
  consolidated ? i.e Pubs ? and was only remedied through
  legislation: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Guest_beerThe US is
  nowhere near the same setup, though, so it's doubtful it would
  end up quite as bad. For beer at least, every time there's a
  consolidation, there's an opportunity for a new player to enter
  the market they just left behind.
 
  mustacheemperor - 9 minutes ago
  The problem with beer consolidation is what "regulating quality"
  at scale entails. Consistent quality in gigantic batches often
  translates to lower quality beer than pre-acquisition. Maybe it's
  just not possible to scale every recipe to nationwide
  distribution, but if that's the case it still means a small
  brewery's acquisition and subsequent scaling to national levels
  generally means the taste you were used to is gone for good.Case
  in point, Magic Hat. The beers are entirely different since
  acquisition by NAB, and terrible. There are nationally available
  independent breweries that make quality beer - Oskar Blues comes
  to mind. They scaled without selling, and I have no doubt NAB or
  ABI would have absolutely destroyed the recipes in their own
  scaling process.
 
    tptacek - 6 minutes ago
    But a case in the other direction is Three Floyds, which is
    independent but scaling and suffering major quality
    problems.You can lament your favorite beers attempting to scale
    production at all, and that's an understandable feeling to
    have, but it's ultimately no more reasonable a demand than that
    your favorite band continue playing your favorite tiny local
    club.The sibling commenter here said something I believe as
    well, which is that in the US market at least, every
    acquisition is just going to make room for a new independent.
 
  brational - 5 minutes ago
  I agree here - and many of my beer nerd friends religiously use
  this app to rate every beer they drink (Untappd I think its
  called?). Which I believe is free.So if said beer nerd had an
  issue with the big corps buying up ratings... perhaps paying for
  apps or donating in some way is what one ought to do.
 
  SomeStupidPoint - moments ago
  Consistently, my experience with market consolidation has been
  lower quality products for more money so I can susidize the
  wealth of merger consultants.If consolidation has such a prior,
  why would I expect beer consolidation to end
  differently?Similarly, I disagree about whiskey: distilleries
  from my state consistently provide a better and cheaper product
  than large firms, and are basically dead to me when they sell
  these days, after a few bad experiences.