GOPHERSPACE.DE - P H O X Y
gophering on hngopher.com
HN Gopher Feed (2017-11-08) - page 1 of 10
 
___________________________________________________________________
BitTorrent inventor announces eco-friendly Bitcoin competitor Chia
152 points by chriskanan
https://techcrunch.com/2017/11/08/chia-network-cryptocurrency
___________________________________________________________________
 
kiddico - 2 hours ago
One of the only things I dislike about bitcoin and other
cryptocurrencies is the flagrant use of power that doesn't
necessarily compute anything.With the proof of chia being used in
storage, does that imply a lower power cost? I'm not sure what
proof of time is either...Does anyone know more about this and can
clarify things?
 
  Squithrilve - 2 hours ago
  > flagrant use of power that doesn't necessarily compute
  anything.I don't get it. Why won't you complain about monitor
  pixels, that don't display content using/wasting power or various
  unused/reserved bits transmitted every second
  (https://tools.ietf.org/html/draft-abhi-covert-00) that also
  waste power. Proof of work uses energy to meet some strict
  guarantees.This reminds me of complaining that SSL is
  computationally expensive and therefore plain HTTP is better. 10
  years ago of course.
 
    viraptor - 1 hours ago
    The comparisons fall short.- pixels are being optimised, with
    displays going closer and closer to true-off all the time-
    pixels: even whitespace is important next to information- RFC:
    we're wasting a few bits as a tradeoff for less complicated
    hardware and less processing power. Not sure if applicable
    anymore, but reserved fields and consistent parsing saved us
    some power/materials historically.- SSL provides security and
    privacy in your communication at a cost reasonable for the
    outcome.It's only logical they if we don't need to spend the
    energy to mine coins, we should stop doing that sooner then
    later.
 
    eridius - 1 hours ago
    If bitcoin's power usage is like a massive drain in the middle
    of the ocean sucking down millions of gallons of water per
    second, your comment is like complaining about the drip on your
    kitchen faucet.
 
    gtrubetskoy - 1 hours ago
    > Why won't you complain about monitor pixelsor the Sun, what a
    waste of energy that is
 
      traverseda - 1 hours ago
      Yeah, we gotta get on that dyson {sphere,swarm,etc} thing.
 
    traverseda - 1 hours ago
    The problem is that coin incentivizes* the use of electricity,
    which is a dumb thing to incentivize. Sure, we can incentivize
    the use of electricity, but we can also decide to incentivize
    something else.A system like bitcoin but that only uses (all
    of) the CPU 10% of the time incentivizes a lot of cheap compute
    power for projects that need it. As an example. Algorithms that
    have similar loads to conventional software encourages more
    powerful general purpose computers instead of more powerful
    custom bitcoin ASICS.There are much better things to
    incentivize.
 
    [deleted]
 
    free_everybody - 1 hours ago
    You can't possibly be comparing SSL with bitcoin mining. SSL
    provides a service that is immediately valuable to all parties.
    Bitcoin mining is done by people who want to get rich by not
    doing anything. The price of bitcoin is EXTREMELY speculative
    no matter how you look at it. What if Bitcoin were to fail for
    some reason? All the computation dedicated to mining coins
    which were never spent would be wasted. Entirely different
    scenarios here.
 
    joe_the_user - 1 hours ago
    Uh, power that isn't used for bitcoin mining could be used to
    improve human lives in innumerable way - or not used at all and
    allow a decreased production of greenhouse gases.
 
    kiddico - 1 hours ago
    What are you even getting at here?That is a totally different
    use case. A display is supposed to always be on, while a cpu
    should turn off while not in use. When a cpu has no work it
    slows down to conserve power and reduce heat output. What
    happens when a monitor has no input data? It goes to sleep. It
    doesn't just display the last thing and continue processing a
    stream of data from it's input.
 
  toomim - 1 hours ago
  Yes, I watched Bram's talk in Berkeley two weeks ago.  It indeed
  runs with much lower power costs.  The cost is the power to do a
  hard-disk seek every long once in a while, rather than to compute
  sha256 over and over again.It does incentivize a buildup of
  physical disk drives.  And if it becomes successful, it'll likely
  spur specialized datacenters and hardware (think specialized tape
  drives) to try to outcompete in space, so it might end up just as
  centralized as bitcoin mining.But the power costs will be much
  lower.There also is a proof-of-time component, that does
  computation, but it is designed to not be parallelizable, which
  means that throwing additional power at the problem doesn't help
  you as much.  Instead, imagine that each participant must spend a
  deterministic length of time to compute a solution, and the
  person closest to the internet backbone wins.  But this proof-of-
  time component is also smaller subsidiary role to the proof-of-
  space.So overall, it's a hybrid proof.  Bram didn't go into
  enough detail explaining the actual proof-of-time or space in his
  talk, so I'm not sure if it all works, but if it does, then you
  can expect it to use less power.Proof-of-Stake should use even
  LESS power, though.
 
    cvg - 19 minutes ago
    I believe this is the recording of that Berkeley talk: https://
    www.facebook.com/BerkeleyBlockchain/videos/200606982...Still a
    lot of implementation details to be revealed, but looks really
    interesting.
 
    kiddico - 1 hours ago
    Thanks for the explanation. Does the proof of storage allow
    that storage to continue to be used?/does the proof use the
    space on a disk?Or is it sort of like mining bitcoin where a
    gpu is wholly used for mining?
 
    sillysaurus3 - 41 minutes ago
    Proof of Stake is worth being highly skeptical of. The fact
    that most people blindly support the idea when it seems to
    leave fundamental questions swept under the rug is worrying.I
    wish I could give a further critique, but I'm not familiar
    enough with the subject. There have been several persuasive
    comments posted to HN on the brittle nature of Proof of Stake,
    and the lack of hard answers to basic problems. Tacking it on
    as "this would use even less power" is a sign that perhaps
    these alternate schemes (including the one in the article)
    should be taken with a dash of salt and pepper.
 
  zitterbewegung - 1 hours ago
  Proof of chia would use disk storage which at idle wouldn?t
  require processing . So yes because the other way is to use GPUs
  which would have higher costs for electricity than a disk.
 
  sillysaurus3 - 1 hours ago
  If Bitcoin reached 2 trillion dollars, it would use about 2% of
  the world's power.It seems tough to argue that a 2 trillion
  dollar GDP doesn't merit a 2% increase in power output.
 
    txcwpalpha - 1 hours ago
    Bitcoin's total value being 2 trillion dollars is not the same
    thing whatsoever as bitcoin being responsible for 2 trillion
    dollars of GDP. There is no "merit" here.We can have $2
    trillion in GDP with paper money, too, and that uses 0% of the
    world's power.
 
      simplify - 46 minutes ago
      To be fair, paper money requires banks & bank employees,
      bullet-proof transportation trucks, government regulation,
      anti-counterfeit research & technology, and perhaps more.
 
      yayitswei - 1 hours ago
      Not 0% if you count the resources required to enforce that
      paper money.
 
    UncleMeat - 1 hours ago
    Market cap and GDP contribution are different things. The
    market cap for the USD is very very high, but we don't consider
    all of those dollars to count as GDP nor would it justify a
    comparably large power cost.
 
    notahacker - 1 hours ago
    Do you mean a 2 trillion dollar market cap? That's not the same
    as GDP.I mean, Apple is close to a 1 trillion dollar market
    cap. I'd argue a 1% increase in world power output simply for
    Apple to store its money and make transactions would be a
    remarkably poor use of power.
 
      sillysaurus3 - 1 hours ago
      Unfair comparison. Bitcoin benefits all who hold it, not a
      single corporation.If anything, my "GDP" comparison was off
      the mark because GDP typically represents a country's total
      wealth, and bitcoin can't have a GDP. But it's a useful
      abstraction that comes pretty close.Those bitcoin paper
      millionaires are investing in startups like Pinkapp, and
      Pinkapp is hiring programmers. All of this is happening
      outside the legal system. What does that say to you about
      bitcoin's ability to affect the world?
 
        maxerickson - 38 minutes ago
        Oh man, the legal system is gonna surprise anyone who
        thinks they are operating outside of it. And not in a good
        way.
 
          sillysaurus3 - 37 minutes ago
          Look up pinkapp.https://news.ycombinator.com/user?id=the_
          stchttps://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=15389364https://m
          edium.com/@PinkApp/pink-app-trading-latency-for-ano...
 
          maxerickson - 11 minutes ago
          Sure. But also look up all the dark markets the FBI
          busted.
 
          sillysaurus3 - 1 minutes ago
          The interesting thing is, this founder has apparently put
          in contingency plans in case they mess up. The
          organization can continue.I'm not sure how true that will
          turn out to be, but it's an interesting attempt.
 
        notahacker - 1 hours ago
        OK, let's do it the other way. Let's pretend (in BTC's
        favour) that market cap and GDP are the same thing.World
        GDP is around 100 trillion.So by your own figures, if it
        were denominated in BTC or equivalent cryptocurrency, we'd
        require more than 100% of the world's current power output
        just to store and send people's money.That's more power
        output than is currently required for all the world's
        homes, factories, hospitals, transportation networks and
        all the world's computing power, everything. Which also
        benefits everyone who uses it, and creates jobs for a few
        billion peopleDo you now see why people don't think current
        crypto tech is a particularly optimal use of power?
 
          sillysaurus3 - 58 minutes ago
          This is a strawman argument. I'm trying to think of a
          charitable interpretation, but it's difficult.The world's
          currency isn't ever going to be 100% bitcoin. It's an
          invalid basis to start from.I kind of see what you're
          trying to hint at, but it would be helpful for discussion
          if you could think of a more persuasive example.(It may
          be difficult though, because it seems true to say that if
          Bitcoin starts becoming a significant fraction of the
          world's GDP then it's fine if it uses a little power.
          Where "little" is relative to the ratio of BTC's wealth
          vs the world's wealth, vs BTC's power usage to the
          world's power usage.)
 
        txcwpalpha - 1 hours ago
        > Unfair comparison. Bitcoin benefits all who hold it, not
        a single corporation.No, that's not how economies work.
        "Bitcoin benefits all who hold it" is like saying "the USD
        benefits everyone who has a USD". It's a completely
        meaningless statement.>  But it's a useful abstraction that
        comes pretty close.No, it doesn't come close at all.
        Bitcoin's market cap has absolutely nothing to do with the
        value that Bitcoin adds to society, and thus it is a
        completely meaningless metric to look at if you are trying
        to decide if it "merits" use of our resources.>Those
        bitcoin paper millionaires are investing in startups like
        Pinkapp, and Pinkapp is hiring programmers. All of this is
        happening outside the legal system. What does that say to
        you about bitcoin's ability to affect the world?Nothing? I
        don't know what you're trying to say with this. Just
        because people made money off of bitcoin and now can use
        that money to hire other people does not mean it is
        affecting the world any more than anything else that people
        make money off of.I also have no idea what you mean when
        you say "All of this is happening outside the legal
        system." That is another completely meaningless statement.
        I assure you that investments in startups and hiring of
        programmers all happens firmly within the bounds of all
        applicable legal systems. But even if it wasn't, it still
        says nothing about bitcoin's "ability to affect the
        world".You need to stop drinking the bitcoin koolaid, bro.
        You're spouting nonsense in an attempt to defend it.
 
          sillysaurus3 - 1 hours ago
          Just because people made money off of bitcoin and now can
          use that money to hire other people does not mean it is
          affecting the worldThis doesn't follow.I also have no
          idea what you mean when you say "All of this is happening
          outside the legal system." That is another completely
          meaningless statement. I assure you that investments in
          startups and hiring of programmers all happens firmly
          within the bounds of all applicable legal systems.You
          haven't done even the most cursory search for Pinkapp.
          It's outside of the legal system, i.e. criminal.You need
          to stop drinking the bitcoin koolaid, bro. You're
          spouting nonsense in an attempt to defend it.Please re-
          read the site guidelines:https://news.ycombinator.com/new
          swelcome.htmlhttps://news.ycombinator.com/newsguidelines.
          htmlIt's important on HN to comment civilly and
          substantively or not at all.
 
      dgacmu - 1 hours ago
      This is a helpful way to view it. Apple's 2016 revenue of
      215B was about 0.2% of gross world product (GWP)... Which
      means the power draw if extended globally would be 5x our
      current global use. Of course, it wouldn't actually happen
      that way, because Bitcoin itself would then cause the price
      of power to increase.Edited: fixed mis-use of "world GDP" to
      GWP as per tantalor's comment below.  Thanks!
 
        tantalor - 1 hours ago
        It's "gross world product", not "world
        GDP".https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gross_world_product
 
    kiddico - 1 hours ago
    Solid point. Unless of course we can do it with 1% of the
    world's power, which is what I hope something like proof of
    space would allow.
 
  gaetanrickter - 1 hours ago
  You can always create a token basket which could be made up of
  crypto's that are more eco-friendly. Systems for doing this are
  described here https://medium.com/@alexanderwestin/3-crowdsales-
  leveraging-...
 
  [deleted]
 
gzou - 2 hours ago
What are "proof of space"/"proof of work" ? How do they compare to
proof of work/proof of stake ?
 
  kanzure - 2 hours ago
  "Beyond Hellman's time-memory tradeoffs with applications to
  proofs of space" https://eprint.iacr.org/2017/893.pdf
 
dynofuz - 2 hours ago
so we are going to go from spending energy for "work" to spending
energy producing drives for "space". Time to buy some digital
storage stock ;)
 
  quickben - 2 hours ago
  Or gridcoin. At least Science is advancing with hydro bills
  there.
 
durkie - 1 hours ago
so this has been an issue that keeps coming up for a while, but i
don't really understand the issue.* As others have asked, how much
is bitcoin supposed to use? What's the right amount and why? How is
that number better/worse than the amount of resources spent on
existing financial infrastructure?* We are rapidly progressing
towards an era of free (extremely cheap) clean power. Just today
(https://electrek.co/2017/11/08/chilean-solar-down-26-as-impo...)
incredibly low bids for solar projects were submitted in Chile at
2.15c/kWh. That's insanely cheap. We're not there yet in having
ubiquitous cheap clean power obviously, but neither is bitcoin
"there" in being able to replace much of traditional financial
infrastructure. But the point still stands: will bitcoin's energy
usage still matter in the not-too-distant future?
 
  paulgb - 1 hours ago
  The problem is that with a competitive mining market, Bitcoin
  energy use will rise until the cost of mining a block is equal to
  the reward for that block (i.e. market equilibrium). So if the
  cost of energy goes down but the price of Bitcoin stays constant,
  the amount of energy expenditure will be (approximately)
  equal.Likewise, if the price of Bitcoin goes up, the amount of
  energy used will go up accordingly.The reward amount will
  decrease over time and mitigate this, but not enough by a long
  shot IMO.
 
  jaawn - 1 hours ago
  within roughly 5 years or so (very rough guess on my part), all
  of the available Bitcoin will have been mined. At that point, the
  mining part of the equation will be moot, leaving only the
  blockchain infrastructure to consider. Note that this may not
  hold true for various "forks" of the bitcoin blockchain, or for
  other cryptocurrencies.
 
    alethiophile - 20 minutes ago
    Not true at all. The security of the bitcoin blockchain is
    fundamentally based on mining; after the inflation schedule
    runs low enough that it's not the major component of mining
    rewards (which won't be for decades), miners will continue
    mining, but for the transaction fees instead.
 
    paulgb - 54 minutes ago
    No need to guess, the reward schedule is written into
    Bitcoin:https://bitcoin.stackexchange.com/a/162
 
sschueller - 2 hours ago
Sounds like IPFS.Why do we need an ICO. Can't we just do it like
bitcoin and download a client to start 'mining'?
 
  wyldfire - 2 hours ago
  We don't.  But dev teams keep creating them.  It's IMO much more
  appropriate for new coins to make an announcement, provide a
  whitepaper + source, and start the network at time X.But I can
  (somewhat) sympathize with their desire to be rewarded.  What if
  someone just aims their ASICs/GPUs/cloud cycles at their new coin
  for the first months after the announcement and reaps the lion's
  share of the rewards?  While that seems unfair to them, it is
  traditionally the fairest/most honest method.
 
  pdog - 1 hours ago
  Why would they do all that work for free?
 
  ringaroundthetx - 2 hours ago
  Because nobody skilled is going to build this without payment?
  this thinly veiled criticism of ICOs has that obvious logical
  flaw.Computational proofs take a long time for the development
  team to get funded, and this delays go to market strategies. Look
  at the graveyard of mineable projects before this year's ICO
  boom, broke underfunded devs with no ability to mobilize a
  community to fund the tiniest things. Pitiful bounty systems
  where the payouts can't even motivate the imagined Indian
  developer.If you don't think current ICOs align economic
  incentives well ENOUGH, then discuss that particular nuance
  instead.
 
    jameskegel - 2 hours ago
    Also, mining implies PoW, whereas this is not always guaranteed
    to be the case. It's my favorite, but it's falling out of
    fashion, unfortunately.
 
codazoda - 1 hours ago
I'm trying to understand..."The three best proofs of space rapidly
the propagated through the whole network and proofs of time servers
start working on top of them."Should that read, "The three best
proofs of space rapidly propagate through..."?
 
goodroot - 1 hours ago
I understand the argument regarding power consumption.However, if
we're going to green wash
(https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Greenwashing) a cryptocurrency, we
need to focus on more than power consumption.Given that power is
getting cheaper and cleaner through solar[1, 2], this is asking
people to further accumulate more waste and precious metals in the
form of fixed drives. This is not eco-friendly and it's dubious to
assert such.[1] https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2016-06-22
/solar-pow... [2]
https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2017-01-03/for-cheap...
 
  freeloop3 - 49 minutes ago
  Bitcoin adjusts difficulty based on how many people mine it. So
  cheap power doesn't reduce the cost, since it will just mean even
  more mining.
 
    tpallarino - 26 minutes ago
    Exactly, the amount of money spent on energy to mine is equal
    to the amount of mining revenue. Energy consumption is more
    closely related to price.
 
wyldfire - 2 hours ago
> A bitcoin transaction wastes^H^H^H^H^H^Hcosts -- FTFY.  It's not
a waste if you actually got something for it.  e.g. your chemical
ICE in your car produces heat that is useful in cold weather.  Not
waste heat if it has utility.  Electric cars have to spend
electrical energy to generate the same heat.That said, the fact
that this keeps coming up would indicate that there's definitely a
marketplace for a coin that costs less energy/emissions for the
same features.
 
  wbkang - 2 hours ago
  Waste: use or expend carelessly, extravagantly, or to no purpose.
 
    solotronics - 1 hours ago
    see the interesting part here is that if you can come up with a
    less wasteful way to mine BTC anyone is welcome to do that. You
    would become rich beyond your dreams for this.
 
    jkdufair - 1 hours ago
    If we use the assumption is that the energy is carbon-based and
    we consider externalities, extravagant may well be the right
    term.
 
    wyldfire - 2 hours ago
    IMO it's none of those, and I think I'm being honest and fair
    here -- not just a bitcoin fanboy.What's the baseline for a
    corresponding transaction?  Maybe that's a credit card which
    will cost (not waste here either) 1-2% of the purchase price.
    But even that's not quite fair because the merchant is taking
    some risk on this purchase that usually amounts to some
    additional cost.  Also credit cards can't be used to secure
    transactions of >= millions of USD (and if they did it would be
    at a significantly higher cost).  Bitcoin transactions at the
    low end of that spectrum are prohibitively expensive, though.
 
      mrguyorama - 1 hours ago
      Bitcoin doesn't replace credit card transactions or system.
      You have to judge it by it's actual value, not what it
      pretends to want to be
 
        wyldfire - 1 hours ago
        Yes, fair enough -- it is truly unique and difficult to
        compare w/credit cards.But to further the debate, how would
        you evaluate it in these terms ("waste"/"extravagance")?
        Would you stipulate that it has value or that it at least
        has utility?  What sort of analogy or baseline would you
        compare it to, so that we could evaluate how efficient or
        wasteful it is?
 
      wmf - 1 hours ago
      What's the baseline for a corresponding transaction?A proof
      of stake system that consumes virtually no energy and charges
      negligible fees (if it works)?
 
  mej10 - 2 hours ago
  Personally, I think it would be morally reprehensible to use
  energy to keep BTC alive if there are vastly more efficient
  alternatives that achieve the same goal. Though I am interested
  in counter-arguments.
 
    wyldfire - 2 hours ago
    I don't think "reprehensible" applies here.  We keep running
    old computers and old cars and we replace them as the old ones
    wear out.  Bitcoin's ubiquity will be hard to unseat but all
    you can do is try to convince individual wallet-holders and
    merchants to use [the new more efficient coin].Other coins have
    been proposed that either reduce the amount of computation
    (PPC) or increase the utility of the calculations (XPM).  Note
    that those have existed for a long time and don't require an
    ICO.  Using storage space as a (hopefully?) less energy-
    intensive contest to replace PoW is interesting although I
    suspect that Chia isn't truly novel here either.
 
  Karrot_Kream - 2 hours ago
  I like your ICE analogy, but likewise ICEs have gone through a
  century of constant innovation to make them more efficient.
  Likewise, Bitcoin may be the first example of a distributed
  consensus blockchain, but isn't the only way to implement
  one.We're just in the process of coming up with alternative ways
  of doing what Bitcoin does in a more efficient manner, much like
  what ICE innovation has done and continues to do.
 
amenghra - 1 hours ago
Relevant talk: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aYG0NxoG7yw
 
giancarlostoro - 19 minutes ago
So... One thing I missed is, how do you mine Chia? Do you mine it?
How much will there be... these are the questions, is it
technically a cryptocurrency or just a digital currency?
 
craigc - 55 minutes ago
There are already blockchains that do not require proof of work
(Lisk, Nav, Dash, NEO, etc) and already storage based blockchains
(Filecoin, Storj, Sia, Maidsafe, etc).It is unclear to me what Chia
brings to the table that is really new.
 
  maltalex - 31 minutes ago
  Beyond the tech, it brings a somewhat famous person, which is not
  to be underestimated. Hype is important, it makes this coin pop
  out a little bit more than some of the others competing for the
  same mind share.
 
  mandelliant - 39 minutes ago
  The storage based blockchains don't use storage space as a means
  of verification- they're storage product focused (you
  buy/rent/use/sell storage space on the platform as a commodity).
  That's not what Chia does; it seems like its primary use will be
  store of value/transactions like Bitcoin. It's the "green"
  alternative to BTC- I wouldn't call Filecoin, Storj, Sia,
  Maidsafe, etc. competitors to Bitcoin (and I don't think they're
  trying to be that).While Lisk, Nav, Dash, etc do use alternatives
  to proof of work, what Chia is doing, from my understanding of
  what they're saying, is using the lowest cost alternative to
  proof of work, which is proof of storage (disclaimer, I don't
  know the math behind proof of storage, just that it's their
  alternative to PoW). However, proof of storage alone has some
  inherent vulnerabilities so they compensate with another
  mechanism, proof of time (again, not sure of the math).Edit:
  punctuation
 
    craigc - 28 minutes ago
    Ahhhh. I somehow missed that while reading the article. Thanks
    that makes more sense.When I saw Bittorrent and storage I think
    my brain immediately jumped to the storage based tokens.Curious
    to read about and see how that works
 
      dpiers - 9 minutes ago
      My understanding is that your computer computes the answer to
      a difficult calculation ahead of time and stores the output
      up to a specified size (ex. 1GB worth of digits of pi) .
      Proof-of-Space asks you to respond with a segment of the
      output at a certain offset. The amount of time given to
      respond is less than the amount of time it would take to
      calculate the output, and so by replying you prove that you
      had it stored already.
 
  [deleted]
 
Pirolita - 2 hours ago
Filecoin and Burst already do that
 
kentiko - 52 minutes ago
Paper on proofs of space: https://eprint.iacr.org/2017/893.pdf
 
jparse - 2 hours ago
I don't see how this is better. It sounds like we have to waste
power running hard drives now. Isn't Ethereum's Proof of Stake
better?
 
  bglusman - 2 hours ago
  I thought so too until I read this http://www.truthcoin.info/blog
  /pow-cheapest/#is-a-work-indep... and, maybe there's counter
  arguments?  But it seemed like a pretty good argument to me.
 
    1053r - 1 hours ago
    Your linked argument is poorly formed. It's true that any
    system which periodically emits value will cause people to work
    towards achieving that value. However, it's not true that the
    work in question will necessarily be wasted in an arms
    race.Specifically, a (well constructed) Proof of Stake system
    will cause people to work to get a piece of the value by having
    them purchase the coin used for staking. This will cause the
    value of the coin on the open market to rise, which will
    increase the equilibrium market cap of the coin in relation to
    the world.Because "money is a veil" [1], this won't create or
    destroy any actual goods or services. It will just transfer
    value from some persons to other persons. Therefore, Proof of
    Stake is more efficient than Proof of Work, because it moves
    cryptocurrency from negative-sum (electricity wasted) to
    something that's approximately zero-sum.Another way of saying
    this is that you can't PRODUCE value by creating any currency
    with zero intrinsic value. However, you can WASTE value in this
    activity, and Bitcoin, as currently constructed (along with all
    possible Proof of Work systems) is wasteful. Proof of Stake
    wastes less value than Proof of Work.1 -
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Veil_of_money
 
      deevolution - 1 hours ago
      How does proof of stake prevent double spending if there are
      no miners to validate blocks? I must be missing something
      here...
 
        AgentME - 1 hours ago
        Stakers take act like miners, but instead of staking
        computation time through proof-of-work, they stake an
        amount of cryptocurrency which gets burned if they ever
        double-vote (and maybe if they vote for the losing chain,
        etc, depending on the scheme).It's not very obvious how
        exactly a proof-of-stake scheme should work though. Many
        past attempts have been pretty flawed. I'm excited to watch
        Ethereum's progress in this area.
 
idibidiart - 49 minutes ago
"Capitalizing, Capitalizing, Capitalizing." Paraphrasing Fake Yoda
(Mel Brooks) from Space Balls
 
DonHopkins - 1 hours ago
Proof of work is conspicuous consumption economics.
 
olegkikin - 2 hours ago
So it's nothing new. Ethereum and Peercoin and Nxt do proof of
stake.
 
  45h34jh53k4j - 1 hours ago
  Slight correction, Ethereum may do PoS in future, it currently
  does not, it is a PoW CryptoCurrency like bitcoin. Because of the
  state of miners ETH right now, I suspect it may take a long time
  to migrate, with several contentious forks. I suspect bitcoin
  will always be PoW.
 
xwvvvvwx - 41 minutes ago
What is the advantage (if any) of this over proof of stake?
 
pmlnr - 1 hours ago
Yay, after pushing GPU prices into madness, now we push storage
prices there as well!
 
  Houshalter - 22 minutes ago
  In the long run it will make them both cheaper.